Cover

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Frontmatter

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Table of Contents

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p. vii

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Preface

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pp. ix-xi

In undertaking to complete the work left unfinished by our late colleague, Dr. Sarah M. Horrall, we have been conscious of the high scholarly standards she set for herself and her collaborators. In her absence we have tried to set and observe comparable standards for ourselves. As...

Introduction to This Volume

List of Manuscript Sigla

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p. 1

Structure of This Section

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p. 1

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Editorial Principles

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p. 2

The sources for this volume are those listed in the Abbreviations and in the Explanatory Notes. The text is presented in accordance with the principles described in Volume I of this edition, pp. 25-27. Expansions of abbreviations in the manuscript are indicated by italics, emendations...

General Introduction 1

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pp. 3-52

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Sources

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pp. 3-8

Early investigators of the poem showed that the CM poet had used a number of readily available medieval works as sources for his work. Dr. Haenisch, the pioneer in the field, listed nine works which the CM poet had clearly used...

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Genre

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pp. 8-11

Literary historians have had some trouble classifying the CM and have usually been content to describe it in terms of its length, as encyclopaedic, one of the comprehensive "Works of Religious and Philosophical Instruction," etc. (Severs-Hartung 2276 [31]). In fact, CM belongs in the genre of biblical paraphrases which have their medieval vernacular...

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Structure

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pp. 11-13

The CM has recently been characterized as an "open" or "unstable" poem (Gorlach, p. 6; Thompson, Robert Thornton, p. 25), one which, like the South English Legendary, scribes felt free to rearrange, or to add to or subtract from at will. The "openness" of the poem must not be exaggerated, however. A glance at the structural outline published by...

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Date, Provenance, and Authorship

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pp. 13-18

The generally accepted date for the composition of the CM is 1275- 1325, and I know of no evidence which would either specify the date more closely or call this into question. The provenance of the poem has been more often discussed. Morns' edition called CM simply a Northumbrian poem, but much...

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Ownership and History of the Manuscripts

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pp. 18-24

Some manuscripts bear no indication of their medieval ownership, but others give substantial clues at least to the profession or social status of those who possessed them. MS L is the only manuscript which was in religious rather than secular hands in the Middle Ages. The name and date of its scribe are recorded: "scriptus Rhodo per Johannem Newton die 25 Octobris...

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Decoration

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pp. 24-35

A major problem with a poem as long as CM is to orient the reader in the text, to help him find his way around it easily. In its original form, now most clearly seen in MSS E and C, the poem was not frequently broken up by headings or chapter divisions. However, even the earliest and plainest of the manuscripts have, or were intended to have, some...

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Influence

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pp. 35-42

From time to time, various scholars have suggested that the CM influenced other works. On examination, many of these suggested influences turn out to involve very general similarities or a sharing of a commonplace idea or topos. In the following discussion, such similarities will not be taken to show influence, nor will close similarities of...

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Manuscript Relations2

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pp. 42-50

Four stemmata have been proposed to explain the relations among the CM manuscripts. Two are included in Hupe's discussion of the manuscripts in Morris' edition. The first includes independent copies of the ME Southern Assumption, an independent poem incorporated into CM...

Abbreviations

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pp. 51-52

Text of the Southern Version of Cursor Mundi: Lines 21845–23898

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pp. 53-99

Textual Notes

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pp. 101-107

Explanatory Notes

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pp. 109-120

Appendices

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pp. 121-198

A. Errors in Morris' Texts

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pp. 121-142

B. MS B, II. 22005–23898 Pricke of Conscience, II. 4085–6417)

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pp. 143-185

C. The Finding of the True Cross (II. 21347–21846)

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pp. 187-190

D. Mary's Lament and the Establishment of the Feast of the Immaculate Conception (II. 23909–24968)

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pp. 191-198

Bibliography

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pp. 199-203

Glossary

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pp. 205-263

Index of Persons and Places

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pp. 265-291