Cover

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Frontmatter

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Contents

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p. v

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Introduction

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pp. 1-34

Nellie Letitia McClung (1873-1951) was an extremely popular author in her time. It was through her recitation tours in southern Manitoba and Ontario that many Canadians first came to know her.1 McClung's recitals of passages from her first two novels—Sowing Seeds in Danny ...

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The Live Wire

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pp. 35-48

"Who is this young gentleman or lady?" Dr. Clay asked of Pearlie Watson one day when he her wheeling a baby carriage with an abnormally fat baby in it. "This is the Czar of all the Rooshias," Pearl answered gravely, "and I'm his body-guard." The doctor's face showed no...

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Babette

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pp. 49-53

If George Shaw had been a Christian Scientist on the morning of the twentieth of October, he would have said that he had too much mortal mind. But he was a Methodist, and one who had departed from his first love, so he merely said that he felt like the very devil...

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The Way of the West

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pp. 54-63

Thomas Shouldice was displeased, sorely, bitterly displeased; in fact, he was downright mad, and, being an Irish Orangeman, this means that he was ready to fight. You can imagine just how bitterly Mr. Shouldice was incensed when you hear that the Fourth of July had been...

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The Return Ticket

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pp. 64-70

In the station at Emerson, the boundary town, we were waiting for the Soo train, which comes at an early hour in the morning. It was a bitterly cold, dark, winter morning; the wires overhead sang dismally in the wind, and even the cheer of the big coal fire that glowed in the rusty stove was...

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The Runaway Grandmother

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pp. 71-81

George Shaw came back to his desolate hearth, and, sitting by the untidy table, thought bitter things of women. The stove dripped ashes; the table over-flowed with dirty dishes. His last housekeeper had been gone a week—she had left by request. Incidentally there disappeared at the same...

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You Never Can Tell

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pp. 82-92

It was at exactly half-past three in the afternoon of a hot June day that Mrs. Theodore Banks became smitten with the idea. Mrs. Banks often said afterwards she did not know how she came to be thinking about the Convention of the Arts and Crafts at all, although she is the Secretary. The idea was so compelling that Mrs. Banks rushed down town to tell...

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The Elusive Vote: An Unvarnished Tale of September 21st, 1911

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pp. 93-105

John Thomas Green did not look like a man on whom great issues might turn. His was a gentle soul encased in ill-fitting armor. Heavy blue eyes, teary and sad, gave a wintry droop to his countenance; his nose showed evidence of much wiping, and the need of more. When he...

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Red and White

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pp. 106-144

Mrs. Rosie Starblanket, taking the pipe from her mouth and narrowing her black eyes into two smudgy lines, listened to the footsteps of her son as he approached the parental dwelling. Mrs. Starblanket did not understand the language of flowers or of precious...

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Banking in London

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pp. 145-151

I determined to deposit my money. I knew that was an easy thing to do, even pleasant, the simplest form of banking operation; and so with my money in my black bag I entered a bank. To the young lady behind the wicket I addressed myself. "I wish to open an account," I said. I spoke casually...

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The Neutral Fuse

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pp. 152-174

In the East Golding neighborhood where she lived she was called the "Bride" until her first baby came, and then it hardly seemed a fitting tide; but she was so dainty and befrilled and sweet, with her London clothes and her foolish little hats that were never made for the windy prairie, that the...

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Carried Forward

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pp. 175-216

The silence of a funeral is like no other silence in all the world. Even the work-horses knew there was something wrong, and, coming to the bars of the pasture, had put their heads through, and stood in a solemn, unblinking row, as motionless and subdued as undertakers...

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The Grim Fact of Sisterhood

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pp. 217-221

When Mrs. E. P. Smith, late of Prince Edward Island, came to live in Northern Alberta, in a "foreign" community, she was horrified to discover that her neighbors did not wash on Monday! She was still more horrified to find that they were not particular whether they...

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O, Canada!

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pp. 222-227

Mr. Felix Martin opened the door and bade us enter. "You will have to take us as you find us," he said grandly. "We are rather rough and ready; but I told my wife when we came to Canada that she must adopt Canadian ways and forget the formality of Maida Vale."...