Cover

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Frontmatter

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

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pp. vii-ix

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ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

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p. xi

As the teacher who introduced me to Saussure and Wittgenstein, Austin Quigley stands at one inception of this book. I have longed ever since for more of his guidance. But before I could secure it for my first draft, years ago, he had begun his own family project. I hope the present draft may renew our acquaintance....

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PREFACE

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pp. xiii-xviii

In a dream I had recently, I am in a hilly, rocky field with shacks and farm sheds. I have come to teach the children of the local population, who don't even take the trouble to scorn the idea of school. I ask one of the ragged kids running around to stop and do something like tuck in his shirt—he complies, then goes right on running and playing with the others. Then I

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INTRODUCTION

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pp. 1-16

When my son was two and a half years old, our speaking together did not turn on shared vocabulary. Even now, I can explain the virtues of spinach simply, or recommend it eloquently or sternly—in the presence of whatever vocabulary or rhetoric, he sometimes eats spinach and sometimes does not. Nor do his actions always result from hunger or satiety; he...

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PART I: EPISTEMOLOGY: What Is Knowing, and How Do We Know?

We continue with another small story about the way my child talks. He had been playing outside with his "nanny," a third-year law student who had been coming over three days a week to help my wife after the birth of our second child. When I overheard a bit of their banter, Andrea was saying "Why do you get to change your mind so often?" I guess Dustin...

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1. OUR PICTURE OF LANGUAGE

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pp. 19-34

Even such a contemporary master of the use of invented pictures to handle reality as Steven Hawking still sees language as reality's little brother. He looks back to the tradition, both empiricist and rationalist, of investigating a nature independent of and vaster than the human. Even for us lay people, this tradition is so intrinsic to our way of being in the...

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2. CARTESIAN DOUBT

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pp. 35-60

Saussure's picture, as we sketched it in the last chapter, places social colloquy instead of rule-governed structure at the heart of language. If colloquy, sociality, are more powerful than the "setting" or "affective climate" in which teaching and learning occur, we teachers might benefit from inquiring into the colloquial wisdom of our times, as it informs our speaking and listening, our discourse in the area of education. If indeed...

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3. LOCKEAN CERTAINTY

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pp. 61-79

I take it that the first epigraph above expresses one of our bedrock assumptions. That a "thing" has a nature independent of what anyone says about it is so obvious a proposition that there seems no reason to state it. So clear an idea is this that we look right through it. As we have noticed in re-reading Descartes, though, looking through an accepted framework of ideas (or as Hacking puts it, using a given "style of reasoning") may...

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4. WITTGENSTEIN'S INQUIRY INTO STRUCTURE

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pp. 81-101

We have now looked through the window of representation, and have seen it as a window, on our way to developing our vocabulary of inventing into a powerful context for education. We have begun to distinguish between the window of representation, with its associated presuppositions about the structure of reality, and another window, which I have...

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PART II: ONTOLOGY: What Is Saying, and How Do We Be?

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pp. 103-105

We are progressively leaving behind, now, the algorithmic model of reaching as instruction, and moving toward what I hesitate to call a model at all, for fear that it will induce imitation instead of invention—that is, more algorithmic teaching, more instruction. Though there is no need for inventing in algorithmic teaching, there is no room for it, either. But in our...

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5. OUR LISTENING WITH LANGUAGE

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pp. 107-126

Perhaps at the outset of this chapter I should acknowledge a certain embarassment. At the current stage of scholarship on Heidegger, it seems clear that he was not only personally but also academically committed to the program for German national greatness or "restoration," which developed into the Nazi regime. Apparently he was guilty, as rector of the University of Freiburg during the thirties, of acts that might have supported...

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6. LANGUAGING AS SHARING

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pp. 127-150

Ve have now re-invented language as languaging, and we have begun to investigate how languaging and Being might be related, might modulate each other, on our way to re-inventing the wheel of our teaching as an embodiment of what Heidegger calls Saying. There is one more step to be taken, though, a further shift to be made before we attain that place, and...

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7. HERMENEUTIC CIRCLING AND THE PRAGMATIC ONTOLOGY OF ENCOUNTER

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pp. 151-178

In this final chapter we will begin to construct, in the vocabulary of Saying, a set of techniques for conducting schoolwork (leading it together) as being together and inventing. We will be exploring the "saying" and the "said," asking what is the practical difference between "ethical openness" and "ontological closure." To what extent do we teachers, as bring

SUGGESTIONS FOR FURTHER READING

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pp. 179-181

INDEX

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pp. 183-189