Cover

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Frontmatter

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Contents

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List of Illustrations

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pp. ix-x

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xi-xii

Many people helped me to produce this work, and I want to thank them for their time and assistance. First, and foremost, I want to acknowledge and express many thanks to the members of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians for allowing me to spend time in their community to learn about the art of Cherokee fishing. I must express my deepest appreciation and gratitude...

Notes on the Transcription of Cherokee Words in the Text

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pp. xiii-xiv

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1. Introduction

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pp. 1-15

Reminiscences and recollections of fishing have a certain reputation for being exaggerated and far-fetched, and so some might see them as a suitable topic for mythology and leave it at that. However, I chose to begin this research by asking people about fishing experiences because fishing is a topic that people enjoy talking about, and thus it provides a stimulating basis for discussion, interaction, and...

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2. Cherokee History and the Changing Environment: Effects on Fish and Fishing

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pp. 16-35

Cherokee people have persevered and adapted their language and culture throughout their complex history, First facing the events of colonization and later the processes of modernization, globalization, and economic development. Each of these agents of change has had significant impact on subsistence practices generally, but the resulting environmental changes have had specific impact on...

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3. Subsistence, Material Culture, and Fishing Practices

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pp. 36-61

Today, tourists and locals who fish the Boundary waters usually do so in one of two ways—either by using a rod and reel and wading in the rivers or by using a rod and reel from a bass boat in lakes and larger rivers. Traditionally, however, Cherokee people employed a variety of fishing strategies and techniques, a fact that reflected an intimate knowledge of the local aquatic ecosystems and their seasonal cycles...

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4. Cherokee Traditional Ecological Knowledge and Fishing: “There’s a lot to that; you gotta know the signs”

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pp. 62-84

In the late spring, riverbanks burst forth in yellow blooms. At the same time the river teems with brilliant red fish struggling against the current to spawn. In the Euro-American view these events are unrelated; simply seasonal occurrences that happen to coincide. If, instead, one holds the view that all living things are connected and have spirits that interact in a realm outside of our ability to...

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5. Tourism, Fishing, and Contemporary Cherokee Identity: The Discourse of Enterprise and Reserve

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pp. 85-103

Tourism is an essential component of the contemporary Cherokee economy and must be considered in any ethnographic account that seeks to describe aspects of the lives of members of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians today. In addition to the economic forces that tourism brings to bear on tribal members, notions of representation, identity, and authenticity are all...

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6. Conclusions

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pp. 104-108

The examination of fishing as an isolated domain allows a small but significant aperture through which to focus on Cherokee culture and language from a variety of perspectives. The insights gleaned from such a study are diverse and timely. Cherokee fishing has been virtually neglected in discussions of subsistence, language, environmental science, and recreation. Thus, in order to grasp the...

Appendixes

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pp. 109-121

Notes

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pp. 123-125

Bibliography

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pp. 127-136

Index

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pp. 137-138