Contents

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p. xv

List of Tables

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pp. xvii-xviii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xix-xx

One acquires many debts while engaging in a major research project such as the one on which I report here. In this case, four debts in particular stand out. First, I am indebted to the hundreds of busy administrators of welfare-to-work programs who took time to fill out a questionnaire they no doubt felt was overly long and sometimes ineptly worded. Many of them and their staffs...

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I. Public-Private Partnerships: Trends and Issues

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pp. 1-39

Polls regularly show that Americans believe government should play an active, positive role in helping the sick, the old, the very young, and others who are experiencing severe needs; the same polls show Americans are deeply distrustful of government. For example, a recent national poll showed that a surprising 8I percent favored "guaranteeing every American...

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II. The Providers of Welfare-to-Work Services

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pp. 40-83

Perhaps the most basic unanswered questions plaguing discussions of increasing the use of public-private partnerships to deliver social services involves the number and characteristics of the private entities that are expected to be government's partners. If for-profit and various types of nonprofit organizations are to play new, major roles in the...

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III. The Services Provided

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pp. 84-124

There is no lack of opinions on how various types of providers deliver social services. Some commentators argue that government social service agencies are large, uncaring, and inflexible and do not hold their clients accountable. In contrast, they often claim that small, community- based nonprofits and faith-based organizations are more flexible and innovative, are...

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IV. The Government-Provider Relationship

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pp. 125-171

Most of the controversy surrounding the use of nongovernmental providers to deliver essential social services centers on issues of governmental funding and regulation of the nongovernmental providers. Hardly anyone suggests that it is inappropriate for nonprofit providers to deliver social services to those in need. We are moved and humbled...

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V. Public-Private Partnerships: Public Policy Issues

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pp. 172-213

There is always a gap between factual description and policy application. That is true here also. There is no clear, readily identifiable, and unanimously accepted line connecting the findings reported in this book with the public policy conclusions to which they lead. In making that connection, underlying assumptions, ingrained proclivities,...

Appendix A. The Questionnaire Survey

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pp. 215-221

Appendix B. Two Key Distinctions

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pp. 222-226

Appendix C. The Questionnaire

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pp. 227-235

Notes

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pp. 237-258

Bibliography

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pp. 259-263

Index

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pp. 265-268