Cover

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Frontmatter

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Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Preface and Acknowledgments

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pp. vii-viii

This volume bring together the thoughts of economists, political scientists, anthropologists, philosophers, and agricultural policy professionals. The question it addresses - that of sustainability in development - is of necessity interdisciplinary. A theory of sustainable development must take into account economic, social, and environmental dimensions...

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Introduction: An Assessment of Sustainable Development

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pp. 1-10

In 1987 the World Commission on Environment and Development (WCED) introduced the term sustainable development, defined as "development which meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs." Since the publication of their report...

Part 1. Institutional Perspectives on Sustainable Development

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pp. 11-138

1. Sustainability and Systemic Issues in a New Era

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pp. 13-32

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2. The Case for the Global Commons

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pp. 33-49

Garrett Hardin's article "The Tragedy of the Commons" (1968) is probably the best known and most influential work in a tradition, dating back to Lloyd's lectures of 1832 (Cox 1985), that has treated common property as the cause of resource degradation, and privatization as the solution. Hardin and others have suggested that...

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3. Development Connections: The Hedgerow Model

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pp. 50-76

In economic thinking, development is a teleologic process; it aims to accomplish changes that will bring the state of the world closer to some preferred state. Different development actors and agents hold different visions of the preferred state - the goal. For development to achieve its objectives, the process must be well matched to the...

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4. Wealth, Poverty, and Sustainable Development

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pp. 77-116

Stereotypical accounts of the modernization process in rural Latin America describe the march of progress in glowing terms. The conventional analysis of agricultural development commends and rewards the small community of farmers that uses aggressive and innovative packages to modernize rural production. In contrast...

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5. Free Trade or Sustainable Trade? An Ecological Economics Perspective

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pp. 117-138

Free trade, as a theoretical ideal as well as a policy goal, until recently has been virtually unassailable in economics. It is part of a holy trinity of concepts embodied in traditional economic thought as essential for improvement in human welfare: economic growth, technological progress, and free trade...

Part 2. Sustainability and Institutions in Practice

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Introduction to Part 2: Power, Knowledge, and Institutions in Development Practice

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pp. 141-150

Economic theories of development tend to underplay political and institutional considerations. The focus of economic development theory is on such issues as markets, trade, investment, agricultural productivity, and industrialization. The unspoken assumption underlying much development economics is that there...

6. Stories People Tell: The Cultural Construction of Environmental Policy in Africa

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pp. 151-172

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7. Political Power and Environmental Sustainability in Agriculture

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pp. 173-188

Environmental damage from agriculture is widespread, but the specific types of damage vary widely from country to country and between developing and industrialized nations. In developing nations, lands unsuited to sedentary farming are being cleared and plowed, and soil nutrients exhausted. Farmers and ranchers...

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8. Toward a Learning Paradigm: New Professionalism and Institutions for Agriculture

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pp. 189-227

The 1987 Farmer First workshop marked the growing strength of a new worldview in agriculture: put farmers' needs and views first, and the potential for growth and regeneration in complex, diverse, and riskprone areas is far greater than previously supposed. To do this on a large scale...

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9. Does Food Security Require Local Food Systems?

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pp. 228-248

An overriding goal of international agricultural development policy is the elimination of poverty-related food insecurity, hunger, and malnutrition. Sustainable food supply systems are vital to the success of any development strategy because subsistence needs must be met before other quality-of-life issues...

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10. Community, Ecology, and Landscape Change in Zambrana-Chacuey

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pp. 249-286

During the past two decades foresters have turned increasingly to "farmers" as partners in the task of reforestation through social forestry and agroforestry programs. In some regions, such as sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia, the widespread recognition of women as farmers has led to the inclusion of women in farm forestry programs...

Contributors

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pp. 287-288

Index

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pp. 289-295