Cover

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Frontmatter

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Contents

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p. vii

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Preface to the Revised Edition

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pp. ix-xii

The first edition of Public Opinion and American Foreign Policy was generally well received, but that is not sufficient reason to bring out a revised and updated version of the book. The rationale for a new edition can be found in a number of developments since 1995, when the first edition went to press. In addition to important ...

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Preface to the First Edition

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pp. xii-xvi

Ours is appropriately called the "age of polling." Few aspects of contemporary life have eluded the public scrutiny of the survey. Polls are regularly conducted to determine what the general public thinks about issues, parties, candidates, presidents, institutions, and other countries, to say nothing of products, pastimes, and ...

List of Tables

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pp. xvii-xix

List of Figures

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p. xxi

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Chapter 1. Introduction

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pp. 1-24

In one of several public addresses on the appropriate prerequisites for deployment of American combat forces abroad, Secretary of Defense Casper Weinberger in 1984 specified six requirements for any such U.S. military intervention. According to Weinberger, one of those preconditions was that "there must be ...

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Chapter 2. The Post–World War II Consensus

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pp. 25-40

Among the social scientists enlisted into the effort to win World War II were survey researchers. Their most notable contributions included classic studies of morale among American soldiers (Stouffer et al. 1949) and the impact of strategic bombing on Germany (U.S. Strategic Bombing Survey 1947).1 Julian ...

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Chapter 3. Challenges to the Postwar Consensus

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pp. 41-98

Just as World War II and fears of postwar isolationism among the mass public gave rise to concerns about public opinion and its impact on foreign policy, the war in Vietnam was the primary impetus for a renewed interest in the domestic sources of foreign policy. As the editor of a major 1965 symposium on public opinion ...

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Chapter 4. Opinion Leaders

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pp. 99-162

Until the post-Vietnam era, one of the glaring gaps in public opinion research was the neglect of opinion leaders. Indeed, most analysts have assumed that opinion leaders serve as a critical link between policymakers and the general public-that is, the public receives its cues about politics through opinion leaders (see, for ...

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Chapter 5. Sources of Foreign Policy Attitudes

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pp. 163-240

During the mid-198os, three perceptive analysts of American foreign policy, one of whom later served as National Security Adviser to President Clinton, asserted, "For two decades, the making of American foreign policy has been growing far more political- or more precisely, far more partisan and ideological" (Destler, Gelb, ...

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Chapter 6. A Return to Isolationism and Unilateralism? Pre– and Post–September II

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pp. 241-288

In 1995, four years after the disintegration of the Soviet Union, Arthur Schlesinger Jr., a historian, former presidential adviser, and once a vocal critic of American intervention in the Vietnam War, wrote that the age of American internationalism was coming to an end. Looking back on the commitment to collective security ...

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Chapter 7. Public Opinion and Foreign Policy: Where Do We Go from Here?

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pp. 312-347

A few days before President Bill Clinton ordered American troops to invade Haiti in September 1994, Jeff MacNelly of the Chicago Tribune>/em> published an editorial cartoon depicting a loaded military landing craft approaching the coast of Haiti. Among those on board was Clinton, who was depicted as saying, "Shouldn't the ...

Notes

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pp. 325-332

References

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pp. 333-364

Index

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pp. 365-378