Cover

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Frontmatter

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Contents

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p. vii

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Preface and Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xiii

In 1937 Franklin Roosevelt was finally able to make his own appointments to the Court. He eventually appointed eight new justices to what he expected would be a Court sympathetic to his values and ambitions. Hugo Black (1937), Felix Frankfurter (1939), William O. Douglas (1939), and Robert Jackson...

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1. Introduction

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pp. 1-17

When the characters are large and the jurisprudential stakes high, an approach favoring personal pro‹le over full-blown biography or constitutional history does its best work. This is true on both fronts here. The period principally under review, the 1941–54 Supreme Court terms, charts the time Frankfurter, Black, Douglas, and Jackson served together...

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2. The Tragic Figure of Robert Jackson

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pp. 19-59

The distinguishing aspect of Robert Jackson’s career is not that he went from a small, solo law practice in western New York state to become the solicitor general of the United States, the attorney general of the United States, a U.S. Supreme Court justice, and the nation’s lead prosecutor at the...

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3. Felix Frankfurter and Arrogance Rewarded

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pp. 61-97

Felix Frankfurter came to the Court in 1939 at the age of fifty-seven, believing he had been better prepared to do its work than anyone in its history. Twenty-three years later, he left the Court, implicitly hectoring his brethren for their failure to follow the standard he had articulated throughout his...

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4. Hugo Black and the Perils of Literalism

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pp. 99-128

With Hugo Black we come to a rare example of a Supreme Court justice doubling as a national hero. In the twentieth century only Oliver Wendell Holmes and Earl Warren have had greater public recognition for their role as justices, and in the case of Chief Justice Warren not all of the public’s sentiments...

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5. William O. Douglas: Judging and Being Judged

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pp. 129-164

While there has been some controversy about some of the details of William O. Douglas’s life, at least as he recounted them, the degrees in the arc of his career of high achievement are well known. The details of his personal life aside, his enduring legacy comes in the contrast between Douglas...

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6. Conclusion

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pp. 165-168

The story of Justices Jackson, Frankfurter, Black, and Douglas is really three interrelated stories that affect our current understanding of the Court and its justices. One story is about the Court’s evolving civil rights jurisprudence, a jurisprudence that was born in the period that the four justices...

Appendix

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pp. 169-173

Notes

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pp. 175-194

Bibliography

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pp. 195-201

Index

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pp. 203-206