In this Book

summary
Although cross-cultural encounter is often considered an economic or political matter, beauty, taste, and artistry were central to cultural exchange and political negotiation in early and nineteenth-century America. Part of a new wave of scholarship in early American studies that contextualizes American writing in Indigenous space, Literary Indians highlights the significance of Indigenous aesthetic practices to American literary production.

Countering the prevailing notion of the "literary Indian" as a construct of the white American literary imagination, Angela Calcaterra reveals how Native people's pre-existing and evolving aesthetic practices influenced Anglo-American writing in precise ways. Indigenous aesthetics helped to establish borders and foster alliances that pushed against Anglo-American settlement practices and contributed to the discursive, divided, unfinished aspects of American letters. Focusing on tribal histories and Indigenous artistry, Calcaterra locates surprising connections and important distinctions between Native and Anglo-American literary aesthetics in a new history of early American encounter, identity, literature, and culture.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Title Page, Copyright, Dedication
  2. pp. i-vi
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. vii-viii
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  1. List of Figures
  2. pp. ix-x
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. xi-xvi
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  1. Introduction: Redefining the Literary Indian
  2. pp. 1-14
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  1. Chapter One. Boundaries and Paths: Storied Maps of the Virginia–North Carolina Dividing Line and Its Crossings
  2. pp. 15-46
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  1. Chapter Two. Fire and Chain: Samson Occom’s Letters, Anglo-American Missions, and Haudenosaunee Eloquence
  2. pp. 47-82
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  1. Chapter Three. Generational Objects: Mohegan Nationhood, Indigenous Correspondence, and Lydia Huntley Sigourney’s Unpopular Aesthetic
  2. pp. 83-115
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  1. Chapter Four. Trails: Pawnee and Osage Orientations in Washington Irving, James Fenimore Cooper, and Edwin James
  2. pp. 116-145
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  1. Chapter Five. Perspectives: Taking a Second Look with Charles Alexander Eastman
  2. pp. 146-174
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  1. Afterword
  2. pp. 175-178
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 179-204
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  1. Bibliography
  2. pp. 205-222
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 223-230
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Additional Information

ISBN
9781469646961
Related ISBN
9781469646947
MARC Record
OCLC
1059450590
Pages
246
Launched on MUSE
2018-12-03
Language
English
Open Access
No
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