In this Book

summary
During its golden years, the twentieth-century black press was a tool of black men's leadership, public voice, and gender and identity formation. Those at the helm of black newspapers used their platforms to wage a fight for racial justice and black manhood. In a story that stretches from the turn of the twentieth century to the rise of the Black Power movement, D'Weston Haywood argues that black people's ideas, rhetoric, and protest strategies for racial advancement grew out of the quest for manhood led by black newspapers.  

This history departs from standard narratives of black protest, black men, and the black press by positioning newspapers at the intersections of gender, ideology, race, class, identity, urbanization, the public sphere, and black institutional life. Shedding crucial new light on the deep roots of African Americans' mobilizations around issues of rights and racial justice during the twentieth century, Let Us Make Men reveals the critical, complex role black male publishers played in grounding those issues in a quest to redeem black manhood.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Half Title, Title Page, Copyright, Dedication
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. vii-viii
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. ix-xii
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  1. Introduction: What a Man Sees in Life He Sees in the Newspaper
  2. pp. 1-19
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  1. 1. Go to It, My Southern Brothers: The Rise of the Modern Black Press, the Great Migration, and the Construction of Urban Black Manhood
  2. pp. 20-56
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  1. 2. Garvey Must Go: The Black Press and the Making and Unmaking of Black Male Leadership
  2. pp. 57-96
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  1. 3. The Fraternity: Robert S. Abbott, John Sengstacke, and a New Order in Black (Male) Journalism
  2. pp. 97-134
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  1. 4. A Challenge to Our Manhood: Robert F. Williams, the Civil Rights Movement, and the Decline of the Mainstream Black Press
  2. pp. 135-180
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  1. 5. Walk the Way of Free Men: Malcolm X, Displaying the Original Man, and Troubling the Black Press as the Voice of the Race
  2. pp. 181-227
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  1. Conclusion: Now a New Day Is upon Us
  2. pp. 228-236
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 237-306
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  1. Bibliography
  2. pp. 307-328
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 329-340
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Additional Information

ISBN
9781469643410
Related ISBN
9781469643380
MARC Record
OCLC
1054644875
Pages
352
Launched on MUSE
2018-10-01
Language
English
Open Access
No
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