Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedicatoin

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Contents

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p. vii

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acknowledgments

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pp. ix-x

The organizational structure for this book came from the Food Network, or, more precisely, from my aspiring chef and partner’s addiction to the Food Network, in particular the show “Iron Chef.” His irrepressible glee at learning each show’s secret ingredient was something that for me, as a non-cook, was...

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Introduction: Appetizer

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pp. 1-3

I admit it. I was hungry. After sitting at the dinner table, staring at the familiar meal set before me, a steady diet of canonical texts by Latin American and Latina women, I craved something different. I needed something beyond the same female novelists, playwrights, poets, and testimonial voices routinely...

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1 Lust

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pp. 4-29

The year 2007 was a watershed for semen. It marked the publication in academia of three tomes to systematically treat the topic: Lisa Jean Moore’s Sperm Counts: Overcome by Man’s Most Precious Fluid, Murat Aydemir’s Images of Bliss: Ejaculation, Masculinity, Meaning, and Angus McLaren’s Impotence:...

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2 Pop

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pp. 30-66

One momentous evening in Detroit, food, pop culture, and sex all converged, when Gael Greene, who, a decade later, would become the food critic for the New Yorker magazine, had sex with Elvis. The sex was forgettable, but not the fact that afterwards, he asked her to call room service and order him a fried...

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3

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pp. 67-102

She should have known. Or rather, she should have realized it the moment he said “Eu te vou comer” [I’m going to eat you]. Only, he never actually used those words. He said “Voce é um prato cheio” [You are a full plate] and she understood by this that he wanted to eat her. He did. He devoured her. Not sexually...

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4 Flicks

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pp. 103-133

The conjugation of food with sex in films over the last 25 years has led to some memorable scenes, including the above quote from When Harry Met Sally (1989, dir. Rob Reiner, written by Nora Ephron). Lust and food were also central themes in the UK/USA film. Chocolate (2000, dir. Lasse Hallstrom), based...

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5 Class

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pp. 134-152

The cocktail of sexuality, gender, and academia over the last 30 years in Latin America and in the United States has been volatile and potent. More Molotov than Martini. That said, it has not been without humor. In 1995, the Chilean parliament banned the use of the word “gender” in...

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Epilogue

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pp. 153-158

There is a revolution brewing. It turns out that many restaurant patrons are now opting out of ordering entrees altogether.1 Marketing executives have found that often they prefer to fill their plates with side dishes and...

Appendix

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pp. 159-166

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Notes

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pp. 167-172

...1 Critical theorist Susan Bennett expands this notion of the interactive state of fluxin the relationship between culture and performance when she writes, “Both theaudience’s reaction to a text (or performance) and the text (performance) itselfare bound within cultural limits. Yet, as a diachronic analysis makes apparent,those limits are continually tested and invariably broken. Culture cannot be held...

bibliography

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pp. 173-200

index

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p. 201

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about the author

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pp. 219-220

Melissa A. Fitch was born in Los Angeles and raised in San Francisco. Her research interests lie in the representation of gender and sexuality inpopular culture, theater, film, television, and narrative in Argentina, Brazil,and the U.S. borderlands. The theoretical underpinnings of her work arefound in postmodernism, queer theory, cultural studies theory, postcolonial...