In this Book

Representing Segregation
summary
Examines racial segregation in literature and the cultural legacy of the Jim Crow era. As a touchstone issue in American history, segregation has had an immeasurable impact on the lives of most ethnic groups in the United States. Primarily associated with the Jim Crow South and the court cases Plessy v. Ferguson (1896) and Brown v. Board of Education (1954), segregation comprises a diverse set of cultural practices, ethnic experiences, historical conditions, political ideologies, municipal planning schemes, and de facto social systems. Representing Segregation traces the effects of these practices on the literary imagination and proposes a distinct literary tradition of representing segregation. Contributors engage a cross section of writers, literary movements, segregation practices, and related experiences of racial division in order to demonstrate the richness and scope of responses to segregation in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. By taking up the cultural expression of the Jim Crow period and its legacies, this collection reorients literary analysis of an important body of African American literature in productive new directions.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Title Page, Copyright Page
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. v-vii
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  1. Illustrations
  2. pp. ix-x
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  1. Foreword
  2. pp. xi-xii
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. p. xiii
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  1. Introduction To Lie, Steal, and Dissemble The Cultural Work of the Literature of Segregation
  2. pp. 1-10
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  1. In the Crowd Artist’s Statement
  2. pp. 11-12
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  1. Section I The Aesthetic Challenges of Jim Crow Politics
  2. pp. 13-14
  1. American Graffiti
  2. pp. 15-36
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  1. Smacked Upside the Head—Again
  2. pp. 37-39
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  1. Section II Imagining and Subverting Jim Crowin Charles Chesnutt’s Segregation Fiction
  2. pp. 41-42
  1. Wedded to the Color Line
  2. pp. 43-56
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  1. Charles Chesnutt’s “The Dumb Witness” and the Culture of Segregation
  2. pp. 57-72
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  1. “Those that do violence must expect to suffer”
  2. pp. 73-90
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  1. Section III Inside Jim Crow and His Doubles
  2. pp. 91-92
  1. White Islands of Safety and Engulfing Blackness
  2. pp. 93-112
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  1. “Somewhat Like War”
  2. pp. 113-130
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  1. Housing the Black Body
  2. pp. 131-148
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  1. Diseased Properties and Broken Homes in Ann Petry’s The Street
  2. pp. 149-164
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  1. Section IV Exporting Jim Crow
  2. pp. 165-166
  1. Embodying Segregation
  2. pp. 167-184
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  1. Black Is a Region
  2. pp. 185-200
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  1. “¿Qué Dice?”
  2. pp. 201-220
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  1. Section V Jim Crow’s Legacy
  2. pp. 221-222
  1. In Possession of Space
  2. pp. 223-244
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  1. Into a Burning House
  2. pp. 245-264
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  1. Afterword
  2. pp. 265-268
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  1. Contributors
  2. pp. 269-272
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 273-280
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