Cover

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Frontmatter

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Contents

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p. vii

List of Illustrations

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p. viii

List of Abbreviations

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p. ix

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Preface

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pp. x-xii

THIS BOOK WAS BORN IN THE LATINO PROTESTANT COMMUNITY. Los aleluyas, as Latino Protestants were once called, often made their commitment to follow Jesus Christ at great social cost. Because they are a small minority within an ethnic minority, the story of their origins has often been lost, or ignored, by both American Protestants and Latinos. Published...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-5

THE CONQUEST THAT TOOK FROM MEXICO THE TERRITORY THAT IS today the southwestern United States made approximately 100,000 Spanish-speaking people into U.S. citizens. These new citizens were Roman Catholic and represented American Protestants’ first significant opportunity to preach to Spanish-speaking Catholics on the American continent. The tensions...

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1. “Planting the Institutions of Freedom”: Protestant Attitudes Toward the Conquest of the Southwest

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pp. 6-15

THE MEXICAN-AMERICAN WAR (1846–1848) GENERATED OpposItion and protest from many Anglo American Protestants.1 A strong antiwar sentiment in many churches led to denunciations of the United States’ aggression against Mexico. Opposition...

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2. “Unfit for the Duties and Privileges of Citizens”: Anglo American Protestant Attitudes Toward the Mexicans of the Southwest

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pp. 16-26

FROM AN ANGLO AMERICAN PROTESTANT PERSPECTIVE, THE conquest of the Southwest was a mixed blessing. The United States had obtained land for expansion, but it now had the responsibility of dealing with three “exceptional populations”—Native Americans, Mexican Americans and Mormons—the latter two of which were American citizens.1 The...

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3. “Making Good Citizens Out of the Mexicans”: Motivations for Protestant Mission Work Among Mexican Americans

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pp. 27-49

THE PREVIOUS CHAPTER DESCRIBED THE “PROBLEM” AS PERCEIVED by American Protestant mission agencies: Mexican Catholics had been accepted as U.S. citizens and these people were not fit for the privilege. This situation served, in turn, as the chief motivator for Protestant mission work among the Mexicans of the Southwest. The Mexican...

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4. “Yet Many Do Not Declare Themselves for Fear”: Protestant Mission Efforts Prior to the Civil War

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pp. 50-60

THE ENTHUSIASTIC RHETORIC OF MANY PROTESTANT LEADERS AND mission agencies during and immediately after the war with Mexico did not produce significant missionary efforts among the Mexican Americans in the Southwest. A few tentative efforts were made in Texas and New Mexico, but they all ended by 1861 after a limited response from the Mexican American...

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5. “Teaching Them to Be Law-abiding, Industrious and Thrifty Citizens”: Mexican American Protestantism in Texas

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pp. 61-79

LONG-TERM PROTESTANT MISSION EFFORTS AMONG MEXICAN Americans in Texas began after the Civil War. The earliest renewed efforts enjoyed the help of a Mexican convert, Alejo Hern

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6. “A Slumbering People”: Mexican American Protestantism in the Territory of New Mexico

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pp. 80-109

IN 1869 THE PCUSA WOMEN’S MISSIONARY SOCIETY commissioned John A. Annin as a missionary to work among the Spanish speaking of New Mexico. The Women’s Missionary Society did not have the full blessing of the PCUSA home mission board when they commissioned Annin. Board secretary H. Kendall felt that Annin should focus...

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7. “Doing What He Could”: Mexican American Protestantism in Colorado, the Territory of Arizona, and California

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pp. 110-124

MOST NINETEENTH-CENTURY MEXICAN AMERICAN PROTESTANTS lived in New Mexico or Texas. Colorado had a much smaller Spanish-speaking Protestant population, and there were only five Latino congregations in Arizona and three in California. By...

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8. “A Power for the Uplifting of the Mexican Race”: Characteristics of the Nineteenth-Century Mexican American Protestant Community

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pp. 125-144

PROTESTANT MISSIONARY REPORTS TOLD THE STORY OF THE missionaries’ efforts. They seldom wrote about the converts themselves, except as case studies or as “trophies” demonstrating the missionaries’ success. These descriptions tended to...

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Conclusion: Beginnings of a New Subculture

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pp. 145-149

AS THE NINETEENTH CENTURY CAME TO A CLOSE, MOST MEXICAN Americans occupied the fringes of U.S. society. The vast majority lived in isolated areas, such as south Texas and northern New Mexico, with a growing number in urban barrios. They...

Appendix

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pp. 150-151

Notes

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pp. 152-175

Bibliography

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pp. 176-187

Index

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pp. 188-196