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In addition to sharing the Caribbean island of Hispaniola, Haiti and the Dominican Republic share a complicated and at times painful history. Yet Transnational Hispaniola shows that there is much more to the two nations’ relationship than their perceived antagonism. Rejecting dominant narratives that reinforce opposition between the two sides of the island, contributors to this volume highlight the connections and commonalities that extend across the border, mapping new directions in Haitianist and Dominicanist scholarship. Exploring a variety of topics including European colonialism, migration, citizenship, sex tourism, music, literature, and art, contributors demonstrate that alternate views of Haitian and Dominican history and identity have existed long before the present day. From a moving section on passport petitions that reveals the familial, friendship, and communal networks across Hispaniola in the nineteenth century to a discussion of the shared music traditions that unite the island today, this volume speaks of an island and people bound together in a myriad of ways. Complete with reflections and advice on teaching a transnational approach to Haitian and Dominican studies, this agenda-setting volume argues that the island of Hispaniola and its inhabitants should be studied in a way that contextualizes differences, historicizes borders, and recognizes cross-island links.  

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Title Page, Copyright
  2. pp. i-iv
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. v-vi
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  1. List of Figures
  2. pp. vii-viii
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  1. Transnational Hispaniola: An Introduction
  2. April J. Mayes and Kiran C. Jayaram
  3. pp. 1-20
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  1. Part 1: The Historical Limits of the State in Hispaniola
  1. 1. Shifting Territories: The Production of Space on Eighteenth-Century Hispaniola
  2. Nathalie Bragadir
  3. pp. 23-43
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  1. 2. The Contested State: Political Discourse during the Independence of the Dominican Republic, 1844
  2. Fidel J. Tavárez
  3. pp. 44-66
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  1. 3. To Cap-Haïtien, with My Family: Dominican Passport Petitions, 1862–1863
  2. Anne Eller
  3. pp. 67-78
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  1. Part 2: Representations of Hispaniola
  1. 4. “A Border between Geographies of Grief”: River Crossings and Crossroads between Haiti and the Dominican Republic
  2. Régine Michelle Jean-Charles
  3. pp. 81-103
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  1. 5. “The Tam-Tam of Drums from the West”: Shifting Representations of Haiti in the Later Work of Aída Cartagena Portalatín
  2. Elizabeth C. Russ
  3. pp. 104-124
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  1. 6. Archives of Afro-Affirmation: Post-Trujillo Journals and Dominican Literary Blackness
  2. Raj Chetty
  3. pp. 125-137
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  1. 7. Transnational Romances and Sex Tourism in Chochueca’s Strategy, by Rita Indiana Hernández; “Emoticons,” by Aurora Arias; and “Heading South,” by Dany Laferrière
  2. Elena Valdez
  3. pp. 138-158
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  1. Part 3: The State, the Market, Bodies, and Commodities of Hispaniola
  1. 8. Developing an Economy of Sex: Intersecting Histories of Tourism, Beach Boys, and Masculinity in Hispaniola
  2. Elizabeth S. Manley
  3. pp. 161-181
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  1. 9. Global Capital Disguised as Sustainability in Post-Earthquake Haiti
  2. Kiran C. Jayaram
  3. pp. 182-200
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  1. 10. Ties That Bind: La Sentencia and Citizenship in Contemporary Hispaniola
  2. April J. Mayes
  3. pp. 201-218
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  1. Part 4: Transnational Cultural Production
  1. 11. Interview with Paul Austerlitz: Engaged Scholarship and Engaged Creativity in the Dominican Republic and Haiti
  2. Paul Austerlitz and April J. Mayes
  3. pp. 221-238
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  1. 12. Translating Hispaniola to the Digital Realm: On Teaching Alternative Histories of the Americas
  2. Kaiama L. Glover and Maja Horn
  3. pp. 239-246
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  1. Epilogue
  2. April J. Mayes and Kiran C. Jayaram
  3. pp. 247-258
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  1. Appendix: Course Syllabi
  2. Professor Anne Eller
  3. pp. 259-266
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  1. List of Contributors
  2. pp. 267-270
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 271-274
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Additional Information

ISBN
9781683400486
Related ISBN
9781683400387
MARC Record
OCLC
1039699793
Pages
272
Launched on MUSE
2018-06-13
Language
English
Open Access
No
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