Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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pp. 1-3

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Summary

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pp. 4-9

Dr. James W. Mahoney, whose dates are uncertain, married Amanda M. Turnley; both were Tennessee-born Irish Americans. The first part of Mahoney’s practice in medicine and surgery was in Tennessee, experiences that inform The Cherokee Physician and his collaboration with Richard Foreman. Mahoney eventually made his way to Pine Bluff, Arkansas, following a stay of three or four years in Kentucky. Among his ten children was Oscar L. Mahoney, a Confederate infantryman who in his footsteps to practicing medicine, eventually settling in Phoenix, Arizona, where he...

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INTRODUCTION.

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pp. 10-12

Every new publication on this, as well as other subjects, should have some grounds upon which it can set up its claim to a share of public patronage and support. Had I not believed that this work contained something new and useful, I would not have published it. But, believing as I do, that the “HEALING ART,” as known and practised by the Cherokee Indians, would be welcomely received by many: and having personally tested the efficacy of their remedies, in the cure of diseases after such remedies as are usually prescribed by the whites had been tried and had utterly failed to effect a...

PART ONE.

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CHAPTER 1. ANATOMY.

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pp. 13-27

Anatomy treats of the structure of the human body, its various organs, and their use.

Practical Anatomy, is the dissecting or dividing of the organized substances, to exhibit the structure, situation, and uses of the parts. Those wishing to practice surgery, will find that subject discussed at length in books that treat on that alone. A knowledge of Anatomy is indispensable to him who would become either a safe or a skillful Surgeon; but to a practical Physician, in the treatment of diseases, it is of little value, comparatively...

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CHAPTER TWO. THE ART OF PRESERVING HEALTH WITHOUT THE USE OF MEDICINES.

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pp. 28-44

The enjoyment of perfect health, is certainly one of the greatest earthly blessings that falls to the lot of mortals. Without health, honor, title, wealth, beauty, the kindness of friendship and the tenderness of affection, are all insufficient to render man even comfortable. All these blessings fail to relieve the pangs of disease, and give a relish to the affairs of life. The vast importance of health will render a short treatise on its preservation an acceptable article in this work. It will doubtless be readily acknowledged by all, that it is much better to shun or avoid disease, than to remove or...

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PART TWO. CONTAINING A DESCRIPTION OF THE SYMPTOMS OF DISEASE, AND THE METHOD OF TREATMENT.

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pp. 47-48

I will not trouble the reader here with a long treatise on the doctrines, or what is called the pathology of diseases, which would prove both tedious and tiresome, without imparting the least benefit to those for whom this work is especially intended. But in giving the symptoms of disease, or the various aspects under which it makes its appearance, I will endeavor to do it in both a concise and comprehensive manner, confining myself, principally, to [Page 38] those diseases which are most common in our country, and peculiar to our climate. It is very necessary that the head of every...

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CATARRH OR COLD—(Oo-hur-tlah.)

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pp. 47-48

Colds are so common in every country, and their modes of treatment so generally known, that the reader will doubtless conclude that little or nothing need be written on a subject which is already so familiar. But when we reflect that it is often the forerunner and not unfrequently the foundation of other diseases which are difficult to remove, and in many instances highly dangerous, and even fatal, in despite of medical aid—the subject does not appear so trivial as on first thought; but is one which certainly demands the serious attention of all those who wish to enjoy a reasonable...

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INFLUENZA OR MALIGNANT SORE THROAT. (Oh-ch-tlah-tsu-ni-sik-wah-his-lee.

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pp. 49-50

This dangerous disease is sometimes called putrid or ulcerous sore throat. The symptoms are, soreness of the throat, attended with fever. The swallowing becomes more and more difficult, the skin burning and disagreeably hot without the least moisture, the pulse very quick and irregular, it is also attended with nausea and sometimes vomiting, restlessness, great debility, the face becomes flushed, the eyes inflamed, and the neck stiff, the mouth and throat assumes a fiery red color, and the palate and glands of the throat become much swelled as the disease advances, the whole internal surface of the mouth and throat will become interspersed with brown or ash colored...

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PLEURISY.—Oh-ne-squah-ga-ni-tsu-na-his-na.

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pp. 51-52

SYMPTOMS.—An accute pain in the side, extending to the back, breast and shoulder, when the breath is drawn:—The pain is much increased by a short dry cough which generally attends it. Great difficulty is experienced in lying on the affected side. It is also attended with chills and fevers, great thirst and restlessness as in the inflamatory fever. The tongue is covered with a thick whitish fur. The urine is high colored, the face flushed, and the skin dry and hot; sometimes the cough increases, and a tough phlegm is spit up. The blood when drawn from the [Page 43] arm and admitted to...

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DROPSY—Tsa-no-tis-scoh.

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pp. 53-56

Dropsy is a disease of the whole system, arising from debility or weakness. This opinion is sustained by many of the most distinguished physicians in the United States. Dr. Rush was of opinion, that dropsy was caused by a morbid action of the arteries, and an increased action of the exhalents; or in other words, by an inactive state of the arteries and an active condition of the vessels which throw off the sweat from the body. Dr. Shelton’s opinion is the very reverse, he says: “Notwithstanding the great popularity of this opinion and the high regard I have for Dr. Rush, yet I cannot concur...

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DYSPEPSY, OR INDIGESTION. (Oh-ne-na-tse-tsunah-li-stoo-na.)

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pp. 56-59

SYMPTOMS—Are flatulency, defective appetite, palpitations of the heart, painful distention of the stomach and bowels. The last named symptoms greatly increased by eating a hearty meal or drinking spirituous liquors. This disease also extends its pernicious influence to the mind, which often becomes desponding and irritable, and the poor sufferer exhibits a peculiar anxiety of countenance. The sleep becomes disturbed and the urine high colored.

CAUSES.—This disease originates in a great variety of causes. It arises...

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FLUX OR DYSENTARY. (Gee-guh-tsi-too-nuh-goo-skah.)

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pp. 59-60

SYMPTOMS.—A constant desire to go to stool without being able to pass much of any thing from the bowels, except a bloody kind of mucous. These desires to go to stool are usually accompanied with severe griping, and also with some fever; as this disease advances, the stools will consist of pure blood and matter mixed; and from severe straining to evacuate, part of the bowels will frequently protrude or come out, which soon becomes a source of great suffering, it is also attended in many instances with chillness, loss of strength, a quick pulse, great thirst, and an inclination to vomit....

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DIARRHOE OR LAX.—(TSU-NE-SQUAH-LAH-TEE)

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pp. 61-62

This disease is characterized by frequent and copious discharges from the bowels, unattended with fever, and has not the appearance of a contagious or catching disease as is the case with flux. It generally prevails among persons of weekly constitutions; persons advanced in years and those who have lived intemperately. Many are subject to its attacks from the slightest cold or exposure, which at all affects the bowels; and others are naturally and constitutionally of this habit of body. The appearance of the stools in this disease are very different at different times, depending in a great...

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HEMORRHOIDS OR PILES. [TSU-NAH-TEE-KAH-STEE-TSI-KAH-NU-GO-GAH.]

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pp. 62-63

This complaint is sometimes hereditary, that is, it runs in families, and all ages and sexes are liable to it. There are two kinds of Piles originating from the same causes, and are distinguished as the bloody and blind Piles. The Piles are small swelled tumors, usually situated on the edge of the fundament; where these tumors break and discharge blood, the disease is called bloody Piles; but when the tumors discharge no blood, they are called blind Piles. There is usually a sense of weight in the back and lower part of the belly, giddiness in the head, sickness of the stomach, flatulency in the...

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CHOLERA MORBUS, OR PUKING AND PURGING. (Tah-to-ne-tse-luh-ne-gah-slee.)

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pp. 64-65

This disease usually attacks with sickness at the stomach, [Page 56] pain, flatulence, and severe pain or griping in the bowels. These symptoms are soon succeeded by heat, thirst, quickness of breathing, with a quick fluttering pulse and violent puking and purging. When the extremities become cold, the perspiration or sweat cold and clammy, the pulse irregular and changing, accompanied with cramp and hickuping, the case may be considered very dangerous and will soon terminate in death if relief is not...

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SCROFULA OR KINGS-EVIL.—(Oo-niller-oo-tah-ner.)

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pp. 66-67

SYMPTOMS.—Small tumors appear behind the ears; under the chin they also make their appearance, in some instances about the joints of the elbows, ankles, fingers and toes; rarely on other parts of the body. As these tumors grow larger, the skin which covers them, becomes of a purple or livid hue, with inflammatory symptoms; at length they break and become ulcers, from which is discharged a white matter some what resembling curdled milk. Young persons are most liable to become the victims of this...

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ULCERS.—(Yah-nah-wa-skur.)

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p. 68

By Ulcers, is commonly understood an old running sore, [Page 59] and it is in this sense that we here use this term. Sometimes caused by slight wounds or bruises. At other times they appear to be constitutional or a hereditary disease in connexion with a scrofulous habit. These latter are generally tedious and slow to heal.

TREATMENT.—The ulcer should first be well washed with casteel soap suds, next bathe the part in a strong decoction of beach bark or leaves, after the part is well bathed, dry it perfectly dry and anoint it with cedar oil, and...

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CANCER.—[Oh-tah-yeh-sku.]

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pp. 69-70

The term Cancer had been applied indiscriminately to all eating, spreading ulcers; of a virulent kind. Of the cancerous ulcer, there appears to be several kinds; but the medical profession have reserved the term cancer for the most malignant and incurable kind. The appearance of the real Cancer is as follows: It commences with a small inflamed pimple or lump of a bluish color, which [Page 60] becomes a sore with hard rising edges of a ragged appearance. On close examination of the sore, you will discover two whitish lines, crossing from the centre to the edge of the sore. At first...

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SORE LEGS—(Oh-nuh-sco-hah.)

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p. 71

Sore Legs frequently arise from neglected bruises, cuts, &c. It sometimes runs in families for several generations. When it runs in families, it is generally such families as are addicted to scrofula, scurvy and similar diseases.—This disease bears so close a resemblance to scrofula, and the treatment for it is so near the same as the treatment for that disease and ulcers, that it would be useless to write much on the subject. But as I am personally acquainted with several persons, who have been afflicted with sore legs for...

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WHITE SWELLING.—(COLAH-TE-COH-NU-GO-GEE.)

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pp. 72-74

Different writers give various and even contradictory accounts of this most painful disease. They attempt entertaining the reader with accounts of several kinds of White Swelling, which are distinguished according to the seat of the disorder. All this I believe to be unnecessary in this work, as I offer but one remedy. I therefore make but two directions in White Swelling, viz: The inflammatory or first stage and the chronic or second or last stage. There is no disease to which the human family is liable, that has hitherto inflicted more severe and lasting misery, than White Swelling. It has...

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FELON OR WHITLOW—(Oo-ne-scoh-hupee.)

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pp. 75-76

Felon is an inflammation of the finger or thumb, and generally confines itself to the first joint. This disease bears so strong a likeness to white swelling that I am constrained to believe that it is one and the same disease, for Fellon like white swelling, evidently has its seat on the surface of the bone, or in the periosteum which covers the bone, it is attended with the most exquisite pain; this pain continues, in some instances, for several days before the color or appearance of the affected thumb or finger is materially...

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PHTHISIC OR ASTHMA.—(Tse-nah-wah-ste-skow.)

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pp. 77-78

This distressing complaint has long been numbered with those that could only be mitigated, and not cured; but the Cherokees profess to be master of this disease with all its wheezing terrors. It is a spasmodic affection of the lungs, which mostly comes on by paroxysms or fits. From infancy to old age, all sexes are subject to this complaint. Many children that have been afflicted with it from a very early age appear to outgrow it about the time they arrive at the age of puberty. Also at this age many persons become...

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FEVERS.

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pp. 79-87

Fever shows itself in so many ways and forms, that it is almost impossible to describe it correctly. To judge of its presence with any degree of correctness, we will have to pay particular attention to the following appearances and indications. The state of the pulse, the skin, the stomach and bowels, the breathing, the appetite, the color of the face, the change of feature, the tongue, eyes, &c.—There is generally soreness over the whole body, as if with fatigue after a hard day’s labor, great thirst, violent pain in the head or...

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INFLAMMATION OF THE BRAIN.

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pp. 88-89

SYMPTOMS.—Violent pain in the head, the eyes are red, inflamed, and unable to bear the light; watchfulness, frightful dreams, great anxiety and indistinct recollection. The face becomes flushed, the skin dry, the bowels costive, the urine scant, and there is an extreme susceptibility of the whole nervous system. The pulse is irregular and tremulous, or strong and hard; the arteries of the temples and neck usually throb and beat violently. In the first stages of this disease the patient dislikes to talk, but as the disease...

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INFLAMMATION OF THE STOMACH.

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pp. 90-91

Inflammation of the Stomach may proceed from obstructed perspiration, from receiving blows or wounds in the region of the stomach, from severe and frequent emetics, [Page 78] drinking extremely cold water when the body is over heated from corrosive poisons taken into the stomach; also by the transition of the gout, or acute rheumatism to the stomach.

SYMPTOMS.—Inflammation of the Stomach can easily be distinguished from other diseases by its peculiar symptoms, it is therefore impossible to...

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INFLAMMATION OF THE INTESTINES.

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pp. 92-93

In this disease the danger of mortification is great and relief must be given soon or every effort will be vain.—Symptoms are, severe griping or pain in the bowels, especially near the naval. It may easily be distinguished from inflammation of the stomach, by the pain being lower down, and from cholic, by the smallness and quickness of the pulse, and by the extreme tenderness of the belly, the pain being increased by pressure upon it; whilst in cholic it affords relief, it is attended with sickness at the stomach and vomiting, obstinate costiveness and considerable fever. Great...

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INFLAMMATION OF THE KIDNEYS.

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pp. 94-95

SYMPTOMS.—A severe pain about the small of the back, some degree of fever, the pain frequently darting down the thigh or thighs, as the case may be. The urine voided in small quantities and with difficulty, of a pale or reddish color. The pain in this disease is seated nearer the back bone and loins than in cholic. The bowels are costive, the skin is dry and hot, there is nausea and sometimes [Page 81] vomiting. The slightest motion or jolting gives great pain, and even sitting upright in bed produces restlessness, the...

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INFLAMMATION OF THE BLADDER.

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pp. 96-97

SYMPTOMS.—This disease is known by a sharp pain at the bottom of the belly, immediately above the privates, the pain is much increased by pressing on the part with [Page 82] the fingers; there is sometimes considerable uneasiness in the lower part of the back. There is a constant desire to make water, which is passed with much difficulty and in very small quantities, it is high colored, and not unfrequently tinged with blood. It is also attended with sickness and vomiting and a constant desire to go to stool; the...

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INFLAMMATION OF THE SPLEEN.

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p. 98

SYMPTOMS.—In this disease there is considerable pain in the left side, just under the ends of the ribs, and round to the back-bone. In severe cases the pain reaches up to the left arm-pit and into the shoulder; the skin and eyes are yellow. The pain which extends up the side, may easily be distinguished from the plurisy, by numbness and deadness about the shoulder joint, and also by the seat of the pain being below the ends of the ribs; the symptoms most to be relied on are, puking of blood, watchfulness,...

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INFLAMMATION OF THE LIVER.

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pp. 99-101

There are two species or forms of this disease, distinguished as acute and chronic inflammation of the liver.

Symptoms of acute Inflammation of the Liver.—In this form of this disease, there is a severe pain in the right side, from the ribs to the hip, accompanied with fever and slight chills; the pain often rises to the point of the shoulder, and extends to the collar-bone; there is hard breathing, dry cough, a tightness across the breast, an inclination to lie on the right...

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CONSUMPTION. (Oo-coh-yoh-ter-tsu-ne-si-wah-skan.)

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pp. 101-103

This complaint is marked by a general wasting of the body; great weakness is felt on the slightest bodily exertion; the pulse is quicker than natural, small and irregular; a short dry cough which becomes more troublesome at night; a white frothy mucous is spit up. As the disease advances, a pain, and sensation of heat and oppression is felt through the breast, extending up to the points of the shoulders, the spitting becomes more copious and frequent, and is sometimes streaked with blood—sometimes it is dark, and...

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RUPTURE OR HERNIA.

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pp. 104-105

Rupture or Hernia is an unnatural protrusion of a portion of the bowels or intestines, through the lacerated fibers or muscles of the part, where the swelling occurs. It may be produced in children by excessive crying, coughing, vomiting, and it is frequently produced by gravel. In people who have passed the prime of life and in those who are in the full vigor of maturity, it commonly originates from extraordinary exertion, such as jumping, fighting, wrestling &c., or by violent blows or injuries about the...

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RHEUMATISM—(Tsi-tah-nah-ler-la-skah.)

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pp. 106-107

This very painful disease, in which the poor sufferer drags out a miserable and wretched existence, is quite frequent in the western country. It is brought on by exposure to cold and wet, by remaining too long on the damp grounds, by sleeping in damp places or by sleeping in a free current of air at night, by exposure to dews, by changing a warm dress for a thin one, by being greatly heated and becoming suddenly cool. This complaint may occur at any season of the year when there are sudden changes from...

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INFLAMMATORY RHEUMATISM.

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p. 108

TREATMENT.—Give bitters composed of a half pound of prickly-ash bark of the root, one-fourth pound of rattle-root, and two ounces of blue-root, digest the whole in one gallon of whiskey—of this the patient should drink freely three times a day, or what the stomach will bear. The affected joints must be regularly anointed with the rheumatic ointment— see Dispensatory....

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CHRONIC RHEUMATISM.

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pp. 109-111

TREATMENT.—In this disease give bitters of rattle-weed root, prickly-ash bark of the root, and prickly-sumack bark of the root an equal quantity of each, digest them in whiskey, [Page 91] and take what the stomach will bear three times a day; anoint the affected part with the rheumatic ointment— see Dispensatory.

The bowels should be cleansed and regulated by the use of antibilious pills or some other cathartic. In all cases of Rheumatism the patient should...

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JAUNDICE.—(Foh-lo-ne-ga-tse-nah-noh-stee.)

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pp. 112-113

SYMPTOMS.—This disease is characterized by yellowness of the skin, and whites of the eyes; the urine is high colored and leaves a yellow sediment in the vessel after standing a while; the stools are clay-colored; a dull, heavy, languid [Page 93] feeling prevails, attended with costiveness; the pulse is sometimes strong and full, at other times weak and feeble; chillness for a time, succeeded by flushes of heat; a bitter taste in the mouth, nausea and sometimes vomiting; a restless, uneasy sensation is experienced...

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FALLING OF THE PALATE.

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p. 114

The elongation or falling of the palate, is attended with a tickling in the fauces and soreness at the root of the tongue. It generally proceeds from a foul stomach. TREATMENT.—Gargle the throat frequently with some astringent tonic article, such as a strong oose of oak, persimon, blackberry brier root, &c., the gargle should be sweetened with honey; avoid speaking as much as possible. If this should not give relief, give an emetic. Alum water forms...

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POISONS.—(Oo-skoh-sog-tee.)

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p. 115

Poisons are of three kinds, as animal, mineral, and vegetable.

Animal poisons are such as are communicated by the bites of poisonous reptiles or the stings of poisonous insects.

The principal mineral poisons are the different preparations of arsenic, murcury, copper, zinc, antimony, lead, tin, &c....

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ANIMAL POISONS OR SNAKE BITE. (E-NAH-TUH-OO-NE-SKAH-LOW-TSUH.)

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pp. 115-116

When an individual is bitten by a poisonous serpent, if it be on any of the extremities, immediately tie a bandage or ligature around the limb, between the wound and the body, this will greatly retard the passage into the system. Give the patient a large dose of the saturated tincture of lobelia, if it can be had, if it cannot be immediately procured, bruize the lobelia herb, put it in whiskey and administer it freely, until copious vomiting is produced....

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STING OF INSECTS.

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p. 117

The sting of insects will seldom need any thing more than to wash the wound with the tincture of lobelia, or to apply the bruised leaves to the wound. Tobacco wet with vinegar, is an excellent application, or any of the articles recommended for snake-bite will answer. By applying to some of those simple means, persons may relieve themselves of severe pain, and sometimes sickness. The sting of many insects that are not dangerous,...

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VEGETABLE POISONS.

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p. 118

The symptoms which follow eating or swallowing vegetable poisons, are loss of memory, confusion, vertigo, (giddiness of the head.) wildness of the eyes, stupor, nausea, vomiting, distention of the stomach and bowels, costiveness, palpitation of the heart, and convulsions.

[Page 97]TREATMENT.—Give an emetic of Indian physic and lobelia, in tincture, these articles may be used either alone or combined. The spirits will stimulate the stomach, and render the operation of the emetic...

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MINERAL POISONS.

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p. 119

SYMPTOMS.—Mineral poisons, when taken into the stomach in too large quantities, soon produces a burning prickling sensation in that part: great pain is experienced in the bowels, accompanied with violent puking, and thirst which cannot be satisfied. It is also attended with dryness and roughness in the mouth and throat as if you had swallowed alum; great restlessness and anxiety. At this stage, unless speedy relief is obtained, inflammation will take place, and soon terminate in mortification, and death..

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POISONS OF THE SKIN.

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p. 120

Poisons of the skin, such as are often received from poison oak, poison vine, &c., are very painful, and in some instances produce fever. These may be easily relieved by annointing the poisoned parts with night shade and cream. This herb should be bruised, and cream enough added to make an ointment. It may also be relieved by annointing the parts with equal...

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MILK SICK. (Oo-muh-ty-tsu-ni-tlah-e-stee.)

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pp. 120-122

In many parts of the Western country, the inhabitants are subject to this dreadful and often fatal malady. Some suppose that the poison is imparted to the milk by some poisonous vegetable, which was eaten by the cattle.— Others contend, that it is occasioned by the vapors which arise from poisonous minerals in the earth and settle on the vegetables eaten by the cattle. This last opinion is strongly and ably advocated by Dr. Shelton, which I will give in his own words, for the satisfaction of the reader. He says, “This...

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SCURVY.—(Tah-ne-no-loh-quh-tsi-tuh-ne-youh-tso.)

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pp. 123-124

This disease is frequently of a highly putrid nature and generally afflicts persons who have been long confined, without due exercise. Those who have lived a considerable time on salted provisions, or unsound and tainted animal food, or those who have been unable to obtain vegetable food for a considerable time. Bad water, cold moist air, and the influence of depressing passions, such as grief, fear, &c., have a tendency to produce this disease. Neglect of personal cleanliness and debilitating menstrual discharges...

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DEAFNESS.—[Tsi-too-ni-leah-no-gah.]

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p. 125

When this complaint is caused by original defect in the structure of the ear, it is incurable. But it is sometimes occasioned by colds, affecting the head by inflammation or bealing in the membrane of the ear, and not unfrequently by the wax becoming hard in the ear.

TREATMENT.—When deafness is occasioned by a cold or inflammation of the ear, take such articles as are reccommended for cold, and steam the ear over bitter herbs; this may be done by putting the herbs in a coffee...

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EAR ACHE.—(TSU-NE-LE-SQUASH-TE.)

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pp. 126-127

This complaint though painful, often passes off of itself with but very little inconvenience, without resort to medical aid. It often proceeds from colds, inflammation of the internal membrane of the ear, and from insects getting in the ear. This complaint has, in some few instances, produced delirium and convulsions; when supuration takes place, it not unfrequently injures or destroys the hearing.

TREATMENT.—Lard in which onions have been fried, will often give...

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EPILEPSY—(Epilepsied.)

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pp. 128-129

Persons of all countries, ages and sexes, are in some degree liable to this distressing complaint. The causes which tend to produce it are various and numerous, and the remedies must be varied accordingly. It may be brought on children by worms or by teething; sores suddenly drying up on them, &c. It may be caused by the intemperate use of spirituous liquors, by the sudden suppression of the menses, violent fits of passion, excessive heat or cold, &c....

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APOPLEXY.—(Apoplexia.)

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pp. 130-131

Apoplexy is a sudden deprivation of sense and motion, while the heart and lungs still continue in regular action.

CAUSES.—Intense study, violent passions, wearing the neck-cloth too tight, luxurious diet, suppression of urine or other discharges, sudden checks of perspiration, hard drinking, excess of venery, too large doses of opium: in short, whatever determines or throws so great a quantity of blood to the brain that it cannot return from that organ, has a direct...

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VENERIAL.—(Tsu-ne-nu-sup-huh-skah.)

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pp. 132-133

The prevalence of this filthy disease among mankind, is another proof among the many that might be adduced, that it is the interest of mankind to be virtuous, if they would be happy, and he that would be healthy must be temperate. At what time and place this disease had its origin, is now unknown to the medical world; but it first attracted attention in Europe, about the close of the fifteenth century, and was communicated with great rapidity to every part of the known world, and became such a desolating...

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POX.—[Oo-ni-lech,]

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pp. 134-136

The Pox is a most contagious, corrupting, dangerous and destructive disease, and if suffered to progress in its ravages on the human body, never fails in desolating the human constitution, or destroying life at its very core.—It has two forms. First, local, and second constitutional, When it is first received by cohabition, it is for a while located in and confined to the privates and genital organs; but, if let run on for a length of time, without being cured, it affects the whole system, and deranges and impairs the...

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CLAP.

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pp. 137-139

This disease may be communicated by sexual intercourse. Or if a woman be afflicted with it while pregnant, unless she be cured before the birth of the child, it is sure to have it; some children are born with it, whose mothers have been cured before delivery. These are the only means by which this disorder can be communicated. When taken by sexual connexion in sound persons who have never had it before, it will not in general show itself sooner than from five or six to nine days, but I have never known it to go...

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BLOODY URINE.

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p. 140

A discharge of Bloody Urine may be occasioned by the lodging of a small stone in the ureter, or in the kidney, which wounds the part with which it comes in contact; when in this way it usually deposites a sediment of a dark brown color, sometimes clotted, and is attended with an acute pain and sense of weight in the back, and difficulty [Page 112] in making water; when the above symptoms occur, and it is supposed to be caused by the lodgment of a stone, look for a remedy under the head of Stone and Gravel.—When...

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GRAVEL AND STONE. [Tsu-ni-nic-luh-huh-sko-oh-tekoh-luh.]

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pp. 140-143

Gravel and Stone, though distinguishable from each other, appear to originate in the same causes, and require similar treatment. Gravel is usually understood to mean calculi, (from the old word calx) a limestone, or little sand-like stones, which pass from the kidneys through the ureters into the bladder. Stone is a strong concretion of matter, which enlarges, and hardens by time; seldom found in the ureters or tubes themselves, but generally...

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DIABETES.

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p. 144

Which means an immoderate flow of urine, commonly without any particular pain in the urinary organs.

SYMPTOMS.—The quantity of water usually discharged in this disease is more than double the quantity of liquid taken both in food and drink, and it is as transparent as spring water—it has a sweetish taste like sugar and water, and a very faint smell, as if mixed with rosemary leaves. After this disease runs on for a length of time, the mind becomes dull and...

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CHOLIC.—[Tsu-ne-yoh-low-tis-scoh.]

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pp. 145-146

Of this disease there are generally reckoned three kinds, as flatulent, bilious, and nervous or cramp Cholic. The causes which predispose to an attack of Cholic, are flatulence, indigestible food, unripe fruits, fermenting drinks, windy vegetables, excess of bile, costiveness, sudden check of perspiration, cold, worms, other diseases improperly or imperfectly cured, &c.

SYMPTOMS OF FLATULENT CHOLIC.—This Cholic may be distinguished by a rumbling in the bowels, and a disposition to belch or discharge...

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BILIOUS CHOLIC.

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p. 147

SYMPTOMS.—Loss of appetite, a bitter taste in the mouth. an acute pain about the naval, costiveness, attended with sickness and vomiting of a bilious matter.

TREATMENT.—Open the bowels with some active cathartic, aided by injections. If the pulse be frequent and high, bleed. After the bowels have been thoroughly cleansed, give a few injections, composed of new milk and water, with a little hogs lard in it. When the stomach is irritable, it...

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NERVOUS CHOLIC.

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p. 148

Nervous or Cramp Cholic may be distinguished by a disposition to cramp, accompanied with pain similar to other Cholic.

TREATMENT:—Bathe the feet in warm water and bleed in the foot. If the blood can be taken from the vein which lies nearest the ankle-bone on the inside, it is preferred. Give laxative injections—butter-nut and gulver if it can be had. At the same time, let the patient drink freely of sampson snake-root tea, a tea of bubby-root, or the root or bark of the prickly...

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LOCKED JAW.

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pp. 149-150

Locked-Jaw may be considered an involuntary cramp or contraction of all the muscles of the body. It most frequently arises from wounds, and in some instances from very slight wounds, such as the slight puncture of a pin, needle, or splinter under the nail; also from cuts, snags, &c.

SYMPTOMS—Are a dull stiffness of the head and neck, an uneasiness in the breast, soon followed by a change of speech, and a difficulty of swallowing, the patient frequently remains perfectly in his senses. The stiffness...

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TOOTH-ACHE.—(Oo-yoh-quah-li-skee.)

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pp. 151-152

This excrutiating and distressing complaint, is thought by many persons to originate in the teeth. This idea, however common it may be, is very erroneous. It is in most instances, a symptom of other diseases, which diseases must be sought out and removed before relief can be obtained.

TREATMENT.—When this disease is supposed to arise from rheumatism, look under that head for a remedy.—When it is caused by the stoppage of periodical evacuations in females, refer to that head among...

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BEALED JAW. (Coh-you-cah-tsi-tuh-nu-tis-lay.)

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p. 152

Bealed Jaw is generally caused by cold settling on a decayed tooth. The patient should drink freely of some sweating tea, such as pennyroyal, balm, mint, sage, &c. Also steam the wound over bitter herbs, such as catnip, hoarhound, &c. For an external application, I have never found anything so good as the Jamestown leaves, (jimson) as directed above for Toothache. This, if applied in any reasonable time, will allay the inflammation and...

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PALSY—(Tsu-ni-luh-tah.luh-uh-skah.)

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pp. 153-154

This disease is characterized by a numbness or want of feeling in the part affected. It sometimes affects one part and sometimes another. If it attacks the heart or lungs it must inevitably prove fatal—its danger or fatality is to be expected in proportion to the vitality of the part affected.

Causes which predispose to an attack of Palsy, are apoplexy, obstructions of necessary evacuations, excessive venery, any injuries that obstruct the passage of the nervous fluid to the brain, to the organs of motion, injuries...

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WEN.

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p. 155

Wen is a fleshy substance growing between the skin and the natural flesh, without any known cause. When it makes its appearance on the neck it frequently grows to such an enormous size, as to render breathing very difficult.

TREATMENT.—First annoint the Wen with cedar oil.— [Page 122] (For the mode of preparing this ointment, look under its proper head.)—It should be annointed with this ointment every twelve hours, then apply a...

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DISEASES OF THE SKIN.

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pp. 156-157

The close connexion which exists between the stomach, bowels, and skin, is evidently demonstrated by the fact, that in many instances where the stomach and bowels are internally disordered the skin exhibits external evidence of the disease. Many eruptions which show themselves on the skin, are positive proofs of the deranged state of the system internally. Care should therefore be taken to ascertain the true cause of those eruptions. If they are produced by no impure state of the blood, foul stomach...

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SCALD-HEAD. (Tsa-nah-li-stah-wo.)

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pp. 157-158

Scald-head is an inflammatory eruption of the skin of the head. It generally commences with an uneasy tingling, itching sensation, as though something was crawling through the hair. In a short time, numerous small white pimples, arise at the roots of the hairs, under which are very small ulcers, which will in a short time, discharge a whitish matter. At other times it commences more boldly, and presents clusters of small red pimples or pustules, dispersed throughout the head. Some even advance to...

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TETTER-WORM. Oo-coh-yok-ter-oo-ne-squaw-her

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p. 158

SYMPTOMS.—This disease assumes a variety of forms in different persons. It sometimes come in broad itchy spots, which run into each other, and form extensive excoriations [Page 125] of the skin, or terminate in bad ulcers. Sometimes the skin thickens, wrinkles and cracks, being very tender and painful. In some persons, this complaint is most severe in winter, while others suffer most from it in summer.—This disease is sometimes constitutional and hereditary; when this is the case, it is very difficult...

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RING-WORM.

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p. 159

SYMPTOMS.—This disease of the skin is characterized by small red pimples which break out in a circular form, containing a thin acrid humor. It is attended with itching and smarting, which is greatly increased by over-heating the body. In a general way, the eruption does not spread to any considerable extent, but instances have occurred in which it spread over the whole body, and the skin assumed a leprous appearance. In cases of this kind, the itching is too intolerable to be borne with any degree of...

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ITCH.—[Oo-ni-tsi-lah.]

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pp. 160-161

This dirty disease is infectious or catching, and is not unfrequently produced by neglecting to pay due regard to cleanliness. Some authors suppose it to be produced by a little insect which makes its way under the skin, and thus produces the eruptions and itching. I believe it to be confined to the skin, whether produced by an insect or not. Cleanliness and early attention to this disease will prevent its being communicated to a whole family. Some persons have no more regard for themselves nor others than...

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SHINGLES.

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p. 162

This disease is characterized by an eruption or clusters of small blisters on some part of the trunk, and spreading round the body like a girdle. They sometimes extend over the shoulder and round under the opposite arm in the form of a sword-belt. An attack of this complaint is sometimes preceded by headache and nausea, but this is not very common. The usual symptoms are, heat, itching and tingling, in some parts of the body, which is covered with small red patches of an irregular shape, and upon each...

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ST. ANTHONY’S FIRE OR ERYSIPELAS.

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pp. 163-164

All persons are liable to attacks of this disease—but females are most liable. The infant of a few days old, and the very aged, are equally liable to its attacks. It is generally regarded as an inflammation seated in the skin, and mostly appearing on the face, hands legs and feet, though all parts of the body are liable to its attacks. In warm climates it bears a much more inflammatory character than in colder ones. It may be produced by obstructed evacuations, such as a sudden check of perspiration, stop-page...

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SMALL-POX (Oo-nuh-leh-qualee)

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pp. 164-166

This disease, in large cities and densely populated countries [Page 129] tries has proved a most fatal scourge, and has formed one of the great outlets of human life. It is contagious and extends from one country to another, spreading terror and dealing death wherever it goes. This appaling and fatal malady was unknown to the man of the forest, until their country became inhabited by the whites, and their rivers navigated by steamboats, and cities and towns were erected on their banks. It was then communicated by...

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VACCINATION.

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pp. 167-168

Vaccination is the introduction or insertion into the arm by means of the lancet, of the matter by which the Cowpox is produced in the human system. About fifty-five or sixty years ago, vaccination was discovered to be a preventative of Small-Pox. This valuable discovery was made in England, and has since been made known to the different portions of the globe. It was communicated to the Indians by the English, and is now used by them as a preventative of this dreadful scourge, and however easy may be...

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CHICKEN POX.

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p. 169

This is an infectious disease, and never attacks the same person but once through life. It is characterized by pimples or pustules, on the skin which bear some resemblance to those of the small-pox—though of a much milder form. The appearance of the pimples or pustules is usually preceded by slight fever, attended with chillness and stupor. or drowsiness—a pain is felt in the head and back, great thirst, restlessness and a quick pulse. About the third or fourth day, the pustules become filled with a watery substance,...

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MEASLES.

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pp. 170-171

This is a contagious or catching disease, but like many others it attacks the same person but one time during life.

SYMPTOMS.—Between the third and ninth day—some authors prolong the time to the fifteenth day—after the infection has been received, it produces sickness at the stomach, stupor, dullness, great thirst, frequent sneezing, as if [Page 133] taking a severe cold, a short dry cough, redness and watering of the eyes, and the running of a watery mucous from the...

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MUMPS—(TE-LE-G-NAH-TSI-LUH-NO-TIS-SAY.)

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pp. 172-173

SYMPTOMS.—It usually commences with a slight fever, head ache, a stiffness of the neck, and a swelling under the lower jaw, on one or both sides. On attempting to swallow a severe pain is felt precisely at the point of the lower jaw, and extending to the ear; the swelling increases, and by the fourth or fifth day, the part is greatly swelled.

In some instances, the color is but little changed; in others, the skin assumes a red appearance—about the fifth or sixth day, the swelling begins...

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BURNS AND SCALDS.—[OO-NE-LOG-YER-SUK.

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pp. 174-175

These painful accidents are often the offspring of negligence, and when first received, are very painful. It is very desirable, therefore, to have a remedy, at hand, that will at once relieve the pain and extract the fire. Nature, in her liberal dispensations of blessings on mankind, has not failed to provide a soothing and effectual remedy for this painful emergency. On receiving a scald or burn, immediately plunge the part into cold water, and keep it there until the fire is extracted, which may be easily known by taking it...

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FRACTURES AND DISLOCATIONS. [Oo-nah-tuh-log-sah.]

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pp. 175-176

When a joint is dislocated or a bone fractured, apply cloths wrung out of a tea of ivy as hot as the patient can bear, the vessel containing tea should be set near and the tea kept constantly pouring on the cloths for fifteen or twenty minutes—if the ivy is not at hand, hot water will answer—then take the cloths off, and if it is a dislocation, pull the limb steadily until it returns to its proper place, after which pour cold water on the joint for a minute or two in order to prevent a second dislocation. If the joint should...

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WOUNDS AND CUTS.—(Oo-nah-tah-leh-ger.)

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p. 177

Most ordinary cuts require but little attention, except binding up with a cloth or bandage, and occasionally wetting the cloth with cold water, until it begins to matter, then apply healing salve. If inflammation should take place, reduce it with a poultice of beach, dog-wood, or either kind of oak-bark; or tar plaster will in most instances effect a speedy cure, without other remedies. But when the cut is large and bleeds freely, wash off the blood with cold water, cleansing the wound of all dirt or filth, then draw...

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HOOPING-COUGH.

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p. 178

All persons who have never had this complaint are liable to it. It attacks but once through life, and is contagious, or catching, and epidemic.

SYMPTOMS.—It begins nearly like a slight cold, but is attended with more weakness, head-ache, hard breathing, sneezing, hoarseness, with a little cough, which gradually increases until the face becomes bloated and turns purple, the eyes swell and become prominent....

PART III

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CHAPTER 1.

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pp. 179-190

Previous to the age of puberty, the female is scarcely subject to any disease not common to both sexes, but when that period arrives, they are not only liable to all the ordinary diseases to which men are exposed, but in consequence of their sexual organization, they are also subject to many diseases peculiar to themselves. The organic machine in women is more complex than in men. and the functions performed by these organs are easily deranged, from which diseases of an inveterate and dangerous...

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CHAPTER II. DISEASES OF THE PREGNANT STATE.

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pp. 190-197

Pregnancy, though not a disease, is often attended with diseases peculiar to that state which are very troublesome. The diseases commonly attendant on Pregnancy, are not of a very dangerous character; yet some of them produce the sorest ills that afflict the female race. “Many a female appears to have the curse pronounced upon Eve fully veryfied in her own case. Sorrow marks her for her own from the time gestation commences until the period of her deliverance.” But this is not always the case: some women...

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CHAPTER III.

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pp. 198-203

Labor means the interval of time between the period when the woman begins to be delivered of her child, and her final delivery. Although Labour is an operation purely natural, it is preceded by various symptoms which indicate its approach. A few days previous to delivery there is a shrinking of the waist, sometimes this does not take place until within a few hours of actual labor. Pains are next felt in the back, Ioins, and a slimy matter is discharged from the birth place, generally colored with blood.—The...

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CHAPTER IV.

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pp. 204-208

These pains, are occasioned by the contraction of the womb, in its exertions to expel the clots of blood and secretions which are contained in the womb after the birth.—When they are not too severe, and produce but little inconvenience, it will be best to let them alone. But when they become so severe as to weary and weaken the woman, they are to be relieved by the use of a tea of red raspberry leaves and moccasin-flower root, in which put a tea-spoonful of the anti-spasmodic tincture to each half tea-cupful; the...

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CHAPTER V. FALLING OF THE WOMB.

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pp. 208-209

This disease is common both to the pregnant and unpregnanted state. It is brought on by going about too soon after delivery or the monthly discharge, before the womb has gained its usual tone and strength. It may also be brought on by jumping, or some violent exertion during or soon after labor. The symptoms are: a sense of bearing down pains in the back, groins and privates, and if the complaint is suffered to progress, the urine is frequently stopped by the womb descending into the vagina and...

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CHAPTER VI. DISEASES OF CHILDREN.

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pp. 209-218

Many of the diseases that children in common with grown persons are subject to, I have described, and the general treatment laid down in the foregoing part of this work, it will therefore be unnecessary for me to enter into a minute detail of all the diseases to which childhood is exposed.—I will confine myself principally to the diseases of infants, and such complaints, among children as have not been previously treated on in this work....

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PART THREE.

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pp. 219-340

Materia Medica means nothing more than simply the materials of medicine; it is that part of the medical science which treats of the nature, and properties of substances, whether simple or compound, mineral or vegetable, which are employed for the arrest or cure of disease, and for restoring health.

The Indians derive the materials of medicine employed by them in the healing art, almost entirely, from their own native forest. Notwithstanding...

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GLOSSARY, OR EXPLANATION OF THE TECHNICAL TERMS.

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pp. 341-344

Abdomen, lower part of the belly. Abortion, expulsion of the foetus before the 7th month. Abcess, a tumor containing matter. Absorbents, 1st. medicines that correct acidity, and dry up superfluous moisture: 2d. small delicate vessels that absorb fluid substances, and convey them to the blood. Absorption, the act of sucking up substances. Accoucher, one who assists at child-birth, a mid-wife. Acid, that which imparts a sharp or sour sensation. Acrid, burning, pungent, corrosive. Acute, a term applied to a...

JAMES M. EDNEY.April 12, 1850.

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p. 345

INDEX.

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pp. 346-350

Asheville Messenger.

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p. 351

Back Cover

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