Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Half Title, Series Titles, Title Page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. v-vi

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

The idea for this volume goes as far back as 2010–11, when both of us were still working on our monographs on the Berlin School and Christian Petzold, respectively. Soon thereafter we decided to address more directly emerging criticism of how scholars interested in the Berlin School engage them and how the Berlin School films as such function as “good objects” in the field of German ...

read more

Introduction: The Berlin School and Beyond

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-37

In late 2013, the Museum of Modern Art in New York City hosted a major exhibition of works by contemporary German directors associated with the socalled Berlin School. Given the preeminent role MoMA enjoys among cultural institutions across the world, this two-week event can be considered a milestone in the history of this filmmaking movement. ...

read more

1. The Berlin School and Women’s Cinema

Hester Baer

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 38-58

At the end of Maren Ade’s debut feature Der Wald vor lauter Bäumen (The Forest for the Trees, 2003), schoolteacher Melanie Pröschle sits at the wheel of a car, crying uncontrollably. As her car speeds down the autobahn, Melanie suddenly climbs out of the driver’s seat and settles into the back seat, where her tears dry up and she turns her face toward the sunlight filtering into the car window. ...

read more

2. Gender, Genre, and the (Im)Possibilities of Romantic Love in Derek Cianfrance’s Blue Valentine (2010) and Maren Ade’s Everyone Else (2009)

Lisa Haegele

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 59-75

The American indie film Blue Valentine (Derek Cianfrance, 2010) and Maren Ade’s Berlin School film Alle Anderen (Everyone Else, 2009) are centered on the troubled romantic relationships between young couples in their late twenties to early thirties. Departing from generic conventions of the Hollywood romance film, Blue Valentine and Everyone Else elicit discomfiting affective responses ...

read more

3. Countercinematic Reflections and Non/National Strategies: New Austrian Film and the Berlin School

Robert Dassanowsky

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 76-95

Film studies has long preferred to discuss commercial and art cinemas in isolation from each other or by insisting on one or the other being dominant or even representative within film industries using the same language, usually without sufficient stress on cultural and historical difference. However, the nature of critical postwall era German-language film makes it virtually impossible ...

read more

4. “Life Is Full of Difficult Decisions”: Imaging Struggle in Henner Winckler’s Lucy and Kelly Reichardt’s Wendy and Lucy

Will Fech

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 96-114

"What kind of movies do we need now?” asked New York Times film critic A. O. Scott in a March 2009 column. It wasn’t a flippant question for the United States then, a country snagged in a “swirl of post-9/11 anxiety and confusion” (Scott 2009b) wrought by heightened terror threats, increased government surveillance, economic insecurity, and a sharply divided electorate. ...

read more

5. Cinema as Digest, Cinema as Digesture: Corneliu Porumboiu’s Metabolism (2013) and the Cinema of the Berlin School

Alice Bardan

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 115-134

Mostly viewed as deadpan comedies on the lingering effects of totalitarian authority on the Romanian people, Corneliu Porumboiu’s films are rarely, if ever, discussed in relation to the Berlin School. Anyone familiar with the Berlin School films, however, will immediately recognize the numerous characteristics that the Romanian director’s work shares with them, as it conceptualizes and addresses ...

read more

6. No Place Is Home: Christian Petzold, the Berlin School, and Nuri Bilge Ceylan

Ira Jaffe

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 135-153

Christian Petzold voiced a preoccupation of the Berlin School during interviews in 2011–12 conducted by Jaimey Fisher: “I guess I do not have a true home,” said Petzold, explaining that where he “grew up was a bit like a trailer park” and that he had “always lived in transit spaces” (Fisher 2013, loc. 3024). ...

read more

7. The Forces of the Milieu: Angela Schanelec’s Marseille and the Heritage of Michelangelo Antonioni

Inga Pollmann

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 154-173

Michelangelo Antonioni’s films are famous for their depiction of modern alienation and the corrupting effects of wealth, capitalism, colonialism, and the media in postwar society. These topics are conveyed by means of a refusal of straightforward plotlines in favor of drifts and tangents that defy goal-oriented, coherent, and logical action. Plots get lost, and protagonists lose themselves. ...

read more

8. New Global Waves: Abbas Kiarostami and the Berlin School

Roger F. Cook

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 174-192

Since the breakup of the Soviet Union and related upheavals in Asia twenty-five years ago, there has been an emergence worldwide of film movements that offer an alternative to the dominant Hollywood style of cinema. Echoing what numerous critics have written about this development, I would characterize it as a Global New Wave of independent filmmaking that exhibits a newly conceived ...

read more

9. Bifurcated Time: Ulrich Köhler / Apichatpong Weerasethakul

Michael Sicinski

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 193-210

In 2009, Cinematheque Ontario conducted a poll of international film programmers and curators to assay the best films of the previous decade. World cinema went through many significant shifts between 1999 and 2009, among them the ascendency of the Berlin School. This period saw the release of many key films of the “movement.” In fact, one of the very best German films of the decade ...

read more

10. East of Berlin: Berlin School Filmmaking and the Aesthetics of Blandness

Lutz Koepnick

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 211-231

It is difficult to ignore certain echoes of contemporary Asian art cinemas in the work of Berlin School directors, not least of all because filmmakers such as Thomas Arslan, Christoph Hochhäusler, and Ulrich Köhler themselves have intimated their indebtedness to the films of Hou Hsiao-hsien, Abbas Kiarostami, Apichatpong Weerasethakul, Tsai Ming-liang, and Hong Sang-soo ...

read more

11. Politics in, and of, the Berlin School: Terrorism, Refusal, and Inertia

Chris Homewood

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 232-251

Hunger (2008), the debut feature of British director, producer, screenwriter, and video artist Steve McQueen, depicts life in the Maze Prison, Northern Ireland, shortly before and after the infamous 1981 Provisional Irish Republican Army (IRA) hunger strike led by firebrand Bobby Sands. In addition to winning the prestigious Caméra d’Or at Cannes, the film garnered plaudits from ...

read more

12. Running Images in Benjamin Heisenberg’s Films: A French Connection

Brad Prager

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 252-270

Newly released from prison, the main character of Benjamin Heisenberg’s The Robber (2010), Johann Rettenberger, is both a habitual bank robber and an indefatigable athlete. He refuses to mend his ways and become a productive member of society. He robs banks and even murders his parole officer, but at no point is the basis for his denunciation of conventional morality put forward. ...

read more

13. Ghosts at an Early Age: Youth, Labor, and the Intensified Body in the Work of Christian Petzold and the Dardennes

Jaimey Fisher

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 271-292

Probably the best known and most celebrated member of the Berlin School, Christian Petzold seems to be more willing to cite the influences on his cinema than any other internationally renowned director.1 He regularly speaks of his high and abiding regard for a wide range of both artistically minded and ...

read more

14. The Making of Now: New Wave Cinema in Berlin and Buenos Aires

Gerd Gemünden

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 293-312

In the introduction to their anthology on global art cinema, Rosalind Galt and Karl Schoonover make a controversial appeal for the universality of art cinema: “If art films are to travel to international audiences, they must make the claim that their forms and stories are comprehensible across languages and cultures. ...

read more

15. Toward an Aesthetics of Worldlessness: Béla Tarr and the Berlin School

Roland Végső

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 313-330

According to a widely disseminated thesis, the fundamental social experience of the modern age is best described through the paradox of worldlessness: while modernity supposedly brought us closer to each other through various technological inventions, in reality the social experience corresponding to these new forms of connectedness is the shared experience of the loss of a common world. ...

Contributors

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 331-338

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 339-356