Cover

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Half Title, Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. v-vi

Lists of Maps, Figures, and Tables

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pp. vii-x

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Foreword

Peter F. David

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pp. xi-xiv

Barbara Barton is a gift-giver.
Over the many years our paths have crossed, I am not sure I have ever attended a conference or meeting where I saw Barb arrive empty-handed. Whether it be honey, maple syrup, wild berry jam, or some other product of the land and her hands, she comes laden, and invariably someone leaves those events not only with a new story or insight, ...

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Preface

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pp. xv-xx

My friend Colleen Deatsman and I had just left Isle Royale National Park after backpacking for several days and were sitting in the restaurant discussing wild rice at the Keweenaw Bay Indian Community’s casino with Todd Warner, a biologist for the tribe. I was anxiously watching the clock, as we were to be joined by Roger LaBine from Getegitigaaning ...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xx-xxii

This book would not have been possible without the knowledge, love, and friendship given to me by Roger LaBine, Charlie and Terry Fox, and Giiwegiizhigookway Martin of the Getegitigaaning Ojibwe Nation. Special thanks to Elder Rose Polar Martin for sharing her memories and stories of wild ricing. Mchi Miigwetch and much love to all of you ...

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Chapter One. Manoomin

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pp. 1-30

Many seasons have passed since our Ancestors inhabited the area around the entrance of St. Lawrence Seaway. There the Confederacy of Three Fires members lived in balance and harmony with Mother Earth. It is said the campfires could be seen in all four directions and as far as one could see. It is at this time the Great Spirit delivered ...

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Chapter Two. The Industrialization of Western Lake Erie

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pp. 31-56

Our Stories tell that the people of the Dawn were visited by eight Prophets that came out of the water and gave seven Prophecies to follow. The third Prophet directed them to travel westward until they found the place where “food grows on water.” When they arrived in the Great Lakes region they discovered massive beds of wild rice. ...

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Chapter Three. Logging in the Saginaw River Basin

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pp. 57-68

In the fall of 2013, my daughters Olivia and Alexandria Sprague, Alexandria’s son Noah, and I joined a great group of enthusiastic Hunters of Wild Rice (Manoomin). It was our first time ever doing anything like this, and we were all very excited to be part of this group and to be the first Ojibway to gather wild rice in this area in almost a century. ...

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Chapter Four. Draining the Swamplands

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pp. 69-88

As a Potawatomi person and member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation, my ancestors originally lived in what is now the Lower Peninsula of Michigan and other nearby regions. As I now live in Michigan, I have worked with Potawatomi and other Anishinaabe/Neshnabe persons and communities to protect the environment for the sake ...

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Chapter Five. The Dam at Getegitigaaning

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pp. 89-102

I tell this story to my daughter, giiwegiizhigookway Martin. These comments, based on first-hand knowledge, come from me, and I am the eldest living tribal member here at Getegitigaaning. I was born here, raised here, and never moved away. ...

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Chapter Six. Restoring Manoomin

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pp. 103-128

I think restoration is all about hope. The Manoomin seed isn’t the only gift the plant has to offer, and there’s a few of us that have learned this lesson in our lives. Rice isn’t just delicious to taste, it is also food for our Spirit. ...

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Chapter Seven. Present Day Restoration Projects

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pp. 129-146

The need for restoration is a story that we are familiar with. With every generation since the boarding school era, we have been in the process of reclaiming our traditional culture. In a way, we have been doing a cultural restoration at the same time. That is one of the gifts that we could call a byproduct of wild rice restoration. ...

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Chapter Eight. Harvesting and Processing Manoomin

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pp. 147-158

NiiMaamaa Meshkowewe ausanookwe (Strong Wind Lady/aka Rose Martin) remembers her days on these very lands. She stands now today 92 years old and looks out over the water on Lake Lac Vieux Desert/ Getegitigaaning, and recalls her memories of the Rice Harvest at the Old Village. She was born and raised right here at the Old Village. ...

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Chapter Nine. Manoomin, the Good Berry

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pp. 159-170

In a pre-colonial context, manoomin was a staple among the tribes of the Great Lakes Region. It would not be unusual in those days to find people eating it on a daily basis. The ingredients used in manoomin recipes in those days would have all been Indigenous, whether occurring in the region naturally, or introduced by the people themselves. ...

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Afterword

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pp. 171-174

It is an amazing thing, the Internet. It allows one to search for information in a way that was never possible before. When I think about how many papers, books, newspaper articles, and figures I have discovered online that document Manoomin in Michigan, I feel very grateful I am alive in this period of time. While it is true that Michigan has been discounted ...

Appendix One. Historic Locations of Manoomin

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pp. 175-178

Appendix Two. Manoomin Restoration Efforts as Reported in Historic Newspapers from Michigan, 1877–1939

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pp. 179-186

Appendix Three. Manoomin Plantings at Seney National Wildlife Refuge, 1938–1984

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pp. 187-194

Bibliography

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pp. 195-220

Index

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pp. 221-224

Image Plates

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