Cover

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Half Title, Series Info, Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

List of Illustrations

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pp. ix-xii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xiii-xiv

The excavation of the Grossmann site, which is detailed in this book, was possible only because of Tim Pauketat, his vision and his Richland Archaeological Project, and his funding from National Science Foundation Grant BCS-0219308 and National Geographic Society Grant 7313–02. Cahokia mounds grants helped with dates and digitizing. ...

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Introduction: Structure of the Book

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pp. 1-2

This book presents data from the Grossmann site (11S1131), a Cahokian settlement that was excavated in its entirety. I will argue that Grossmann was a Cahokian administrative center where processes such as hybridity intertwined with ritual and politics. After reviewing some useful concepts—including complexity, hybridity, memory, and thirdspace ...

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1. Cahokia’s Complex Relationships

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pp. 3-14

The reasons that early cities and ceremonial centers rose and fell in the distant past have been sought for centuries. How did this happen? Why did it happen? And how was it related to identity and identity politics? Such questions can be asked of Cahokia, the great pre-Columbian monumental complex and population center in the middle of North America, ...

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2. Cahokia’s Ritual-Residential Core

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pp. 15-34

Cahokia was first described by Henry Brackenridge in 1811, but large-scale archaeological investigations of the place and its related settlements did not occur until Warren Moorehead’s work in the 1920s (Milner 1998; Moorehead 2000; Young and Fowler 2000). Even larger-scale salvage projects began in the 1960s, beginning with Warren Wittry’s excavations ...

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3. Cahokia’s Diverse Farmers

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pp. 35-54

Between A.D. 900 and 1350 or so, across the wide expanse of Mississippi River floodplain north and south of Cahokia known as the American Bottom, were farmers. They hunted, fished, and gathered wild foods, of course, but their lives revolved around the fields in which they grew chenopods, amaranth, maygrass, sunflower, knotweed, cucurbits, ...

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4. The Architecture of Grossmann

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pp. 55-85

The Grossmann site is located 16 km southeast of Cahokia on a prominent upland ridge that divides the drainages of Richland and Silver Creeks, 2.5 and 6 km away, respectively (see Figure 3.1). It was founded in the midst of numerous Richland Complex settlements large and small, including the four contemporary settlements reviewed in the previous chapter. ...

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5. The Remains of Special Events

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pp. 86-118

Various combinations of the things people used (pots, tools, plants, fabrics, magico-ritual items) and the places they used them (including landscapes, towns, buildings, particular settings) mediate the relationships of complexity and hybridity to history. At a special site such as Grossmann, sets of objects from both mundane activities and specialized ritual ...

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6. Complexity and Hybridity Reconsidered

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pp. 119-130

According to a basic dictionary definition, complexity is all about the numbers and kinds of relationships between parts. So is hybridity. We need to give much more thought to the character of both if we hope to explain the past. ...

References

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pp. 131-154

Index

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pp. 155-158