Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Foreword

Joe Biden

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pp. ix-x

Joe Tydings and I never got to work together in the Senate. He served a few years ahead of me. But his six years in office showed him to be a man I would have been proud to fight alongside—a man of principle who, to this day, cares deeply about the direction of our country. ...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xi-xii

have a pretty good memory, but I also have lived a pretty long and active life, and the details of long-ago events, precisely when things happened, who was involved, and what was said, are frequently hard to recall with any precision. ...

Part I. A Political Life

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Chapter 1. Against the Grain

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pp. 1-8

We could hear the wop wop wop of the rotors before we ever saw the two helicopters descend over the trees. Excited by the sound, nearly two dozen of us rushed from the historic old stone manor house and across the front lawn of Oakington, our family home on the Chesapeake Bay. ...

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Chapter 2. Oakington

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pp. 9-29

The guest room where Jack Kennedy slept when he stayed at Oakington, the one with the ceiling that featured a raised ornamental plaster image of Cupid pursuing a half-naked nymph, was at the southern end of the house in what our family loved to call the Wicked Wing. ...

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Chapter 3. A Plan for Life

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pp. 30-44

I never planned to enlist in the army. I did it almost on the spur of the moment.
I had just graduated from the McDonogh School in June 1946 and was working on the farm at Oakington that summer. I had not decided which Ivy League college to attend, although my mother favored Princeton because of my academic standing and athletic record. ...

Part II. Reform and Independence

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pp. 45-46

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Chapter 4. Against the Legislative Tide

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pp. 47-60

By 1954, I was ready to make my first run for a seat in the Maryland General Assembly, but I was stopped from doing so—at least temporarily—by an unlikely obstacle: my father.
I was just twenty-six. I had graduated from law school the previous year, was practicing law with the firm of Tydings, Sauerwein, Benson and Boyd, and had been elected president of the Young Democrats ...

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Chapter 5. Regulating Savings and Loan Associations

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pp. 61-71

Sometimes a simple, almost innocuous act can have ramifications throughout a lifetime.
G. Kessler “Kess” Livezey owned the Livezey Lumber Company in Aberdeen. He was a local business leader and friend of our family, and, after my election to the General Assembly in 1954, he was one of my constituents. ...

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Chapter 6. Kennedy Man

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pp. 72-89

I first became tagged as a “Kennedy man” shortly after two other longtime Kennedy men from Massachusetts, Larry O’Brien and Torby Macdonald, showed up in Annapolis in February 1960. It was the middle of the thirty-day General Assembly session, and I was in my sixth year in the House of Delegates. ...

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Chapter 7. A Prosecutor the Organization Didn’t Want

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pp. 90-95

By early 1961, I had worn out my welcome with the Democratic leadership in the Maryland General Assembly. The prevailing culture in Annapolis, as in most legislatures, is for junior members to be seen and not heard, to avoid making waves, and to obediently follow the lead of their elders. I respected legislative tradition, but I was determined ...

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Chapter 8. A Thirty-Two-Month Learning Experience

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pp. 96-132

When I became US attorney, one of the first people I went to for advice was eighty-eight-year-old Federal Court of Appeals Judge Morris A. Soper.1 It was a wise move.
Judge Soper had held my job a half century earlier, from 1900 to 1909. He was a man with incredible experience and a brilliant career of public service. ...

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Chapter 9. A Tangle of Savings and Loan Scams

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pp. 133-153

In the years before I became US attorney, the seeds had already been sown in Maryland that would grow into a messy tangle of savings and loan corruption scandals that would occupy a good portion of our time and attention as federal prosecutors. ...

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Chapter 10. Kidnapping, Murder, and Assassination

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pp. 154-165

My almost three years as US attorney began with one of the most disturbing and heart-wrenching cases I have ever handled. It ended on one of the darkest days our nation has ever endured.
In mid-November 1960, the nude body of Michael Condetti, a seven-year-old boy, was discovered in a wooded area of Ardmore, a Maryland suburb of Washington, DC. ...

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Chapter 11. Challenging the Democratic Machine

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pp. 166-184

In shock, Hardin Marion and I retreated to the privacy of the offices at Tydings & Rosenberg to figure out when and how I should wage my campaign for the US Senate.
The Kennedy assassination had put everything on hold, including my run for the Senate. The assassination also forced Louis Goldstein to postpone his expected announcement about running ...

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Chapter 12. A Break with the Past

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pp. 185-192

In the Senate campaign that year, it was clear to me that change—generational change—was in the air. The Kennedys had ushered in a youthful revolution in American politics. When JFK took office at age forty-three, he was the youngest elected president in American history. His brother Bobby became attorney general at thirty-four. The president’s press ...

Part III. A Freshman Senator’s Voice

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pp. 193-194

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Chapter 13. Defending the Great Warren Court Decisions

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pp. 195-209

I arrived in the US Senate on the national tidal wave that swept Democrats to extraordinary power in 1964, just one short but agonizing year after John F. Kennedy’s assassination. President Lyndon Johnson won a full four-year term by a landslide over Republican Barry Goldwater, and Democrats captured greater than 2-to-1 majorities in both houses ...

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Chapter 14. “A Voteless People Is a Hopeless People”

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pp. 210-229

Before my first year in Congress was at an end, it was obvious that the US Senate had fundamentally changed, especially on the politically explosive issue of civil rights. The southern conservatives who had run the Senate for decades were gradually losing their power. In their place, a new generation of young, progressive, reform-minded senators ...

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Chapter 15. Fairness in Federal Court

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pp. 230-246

If Senator Olin Johnston had not died when he did, my Senate career might have turned out much differently.
At the beginning of the Eighty-Ninth Congress, Johnston was ninth in Senate seniority.1 In addition to chairing the Post Office and Civil Service Committee, the South Carolinian was second-ranking Democrat on both ...

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Chapter 16. Congress and the City of Washington

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pp. 247-260

I knew that serving on the District of Columbia Committee would not help me politically in Maryland, but I felt it my responsibility because the committee had great power over the interests of the many Marylanders who worked in DC. ...

Part IV. The Hardest Fights

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pp. 261-262

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Chapter 17. Vietnam and the Political Costs of War

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pp. 263-276

If John F. Kennedy had not been assassinated, he unquestionably would have gotten us quickly out of Vietnam following his reelection in 1964.
JFK had made up his mind: we were coming out. Mike Mansfield, the Senate majority leader, was strongly behind him, and the young president had high enough approval ratings ...

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Chapter 18. The Environment and Overpopulation

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pp. 277-291

In my youth, the Chesapeake Bay was a cornucopia.
I was only a second grader when my family moved to Oakington in 1935, but I still vividly recall watching the Susquehanna Flats off the mile-long waterfront our farm had along the bay. In winter the area turned white from the huge flocks of migrating swans. Canvasback ducks ...

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Chapter 19. Gun Control

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pp. 292-303

On a sweltering Sunday morning the day after Bobby Kennedy was laid to rest next to his brother at Arlington National Cemetery, my staff and I met in our otherwise empty Senate offices to talk about what I should say later that morning on the NBC news program Meet the Press and how could I use the opportunity to honor Bobby’s memory. ...

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Chapter 20. One Progressive Position Too Many

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pp. 304-323

In early 1970, the year I ran for reelection, Washingtonian magazine published a long feature story about me with a provocative but worrisome headline: “Will the Gun Lobby Get Joe Tydings?”
The subtitle to that headline was a bit more hopeful: “In This Year of Spiro Agnew, Can a Kennedyite Liberal, Unloved by the Party Pros, ...

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Chapter 21. Citizen Public Service

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pp. 324-338

In the mornings just after the election, I did not want to get out of bed. When I did, I spent the days roaming the farm at Oakington. I did not want to go back to Washington, particularly Capitol Hill.
When I returned to serve out the term, my first priority was to get everyone on my staff another job. I owed it to them ...

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Epilogue: An Open Letter to My Grandchildren (and Their Generation)

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pp. 339-344

Dear Ben, Sam, Jill, Jay, Maggie, Will, Ruby, Emma and Faeve,
The night I was elected to the US Senate more than a half century ago I told cheering supporters, “My fondest hope is that my election will be a signal for independent spirited young men and women of both parties to make politics of the Free State open politics, a politics of merit. ....

Selected Bibliography

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pp. 345-346

Index

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pp. 347-362

Back Cover

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Image Plates

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