In this Book

summary
When women were denied a major speaking role at the 1963 March on Washington, Dorothy Height, head of the National Council of Negro Women (NCNW), organized her own women's conference for the very next day. Defying the march's male organizers, Height helped harness the womanpower waiting in the wings. Height's careful tactics and quiet determination come to the fore in this first history of the NCNW, the largest black women's organization in the United States at the height of the civil rights, Black Power, and feminist movements of the 1960s and 1970s.

Offering a sweeping view of the NCNW's behind-the-scenes efforts to fight racism, poverty, and sexism in the late twentieth century, Rebecca Tuuri examines how the group teamed with U.S. presidents, foundations, and grassroots activists alike to implement a number of important domestic development and international aid projects. Drawing on original interviews, extensive organizational records, and other rich sources, Tuuri's work narrates the achievements of a set of seemingly moderate, elite activists who were able to use their personal, financial, and social connections to push for change as they facilitated grassroots, cooperative, and radical activism.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. restricted access Download |
  1. Title Page, Copyright, Dedication
  2. restricted access Download |
  1. Contents
  2. pp. vii-x
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Abbreviations in the Text
  2. pp. xi-xiv
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Introduction
  2. pp. 1-11
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Chapter One. Maneuvering for the Movement: The World of Broker Politics in the NCNW, 1935–1963
  2. pp. 12-36
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Chapter Two. Creating a Ministry of Presence: Setting Up an Interracial Civil Rights Organization, 1963–1964
  2. pp. 37-55
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Chapter Three. High Heels on the Ground: The Power of Personal Witness, 1964
  2. pp. 56-79
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Chapter Four. We Have, Happily, Gone beyond the Chitchat over Tea Cups Stage: Moving beyond Dialogue, 1965–1966
  2. pp. 80-102
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Chapter Five. You Know about What It’s Like to Need a Good House: The Changing Face of the Expert, 1966–1970
  2. pp. 103-127
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Chapter Six. But If You Have a Pig in Your Backyard . . . ​Nobody Can Push You Around: Black Self-Help and Community Survival, 1967–1975
  2. pp. 128-148
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Chapter Seven. The Power of Four Million Women: Growing the Council, 1967–1980
  2. pp. 149-176
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Chapter Eight. Mississippi, Who Has Been the Taillight, Can Now Be the Headlight: The Council’s International Work, 1975–1985
  2. pp. 177-202
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Conclusion
  2. pp. 203-210
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. 211-214
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Appendix 1. 1964 Wednesdays in Mississippi Participants
  2. pp. 215-218
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Appendix 2. 1965 Wednesdays in Mississippi Participants
  2. pp. 219-222
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Appendix 3. Project Womanpower Staff
  2. pp. 223-224
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Appendix 4. NCNW International Seminar
  2. pp. 225-226
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Notes
  2. pp. 227-276
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Bibliography
  2. pp. 277-300
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Index
  2. pp. 301-314
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Photographs
  2. restricted access Download |

Additional Information

ISBN
9781469638928
Related ISBN
9781469638904
MARC Record
OCLC
1031090780
Pages
338
Launched on MUSE
2018-04-15
Language
English
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.