Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xii

Fulfilling my dream of writing a book has required endless hours of research, writing, and revision. While I anticipated this work, I could not have predicted that a great number of people would have labored alongside me throughout this process. ...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-22

Pirates, smugglers, and other outlaws have been the objects of fascination and the subjects of innumerable works of art and literature. Literary treatments of the pirate are punctuated with moments of danger and excitement so as to evoke the nonconformist and spirited life of the pirate as he pursues wealth, adventure, and independence. ...

Part I ​| ​The Problem of Piracy in Antebellum America

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1. America’s Blackbeard: Piracy and Colonial Life

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pp. 25-48

Piracy is critical to understanding American property and political autonomy on both an individual and a national scale. As this chapter shows, it matters a great deal that James Fenimore Cooper, William Gilmore Simms, and Eligio Ancona turn to the figure of the pirate in their historical romances, given these writers’ critical positions in the development of literary nationalism in the United States and in Mexico. ...

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2. Counterfeit States: Bootleg Currency and Postrevolutionary American Property

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pp. 49-78

Whereas the previous chapter turned to nineteenth-century historical romances about pirates in American literature to tell a story about the nation’s relationship to property, this chapter looks to literature written in the immediate postrevolutionary period that explores early notions of American personhood through the figure of the counterfeiter. ...

Part II ​| ​The Afterlife of Piracy and the Problem of Citizenship

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3. The Black Market: Property, Freedom, and Fugitivity in Antebellum Life

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pp. 81-108

Building on earlier traditions that examine the enslaved subject in terms of property, this chapter examines the presence of unlawful propertied exchanges in Blake; or, The Huts of America (1859) through the lens of piracy. By repositioning illegal acts of property ownership to include fugitivity at the center of enslaved subjects’ demand for personhood, Blake uses the logic ...

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4. Unsettling Subjects: Citizenship and Squatting in Historical Romances of the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands

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pp. 109-135

This chapter considers the act of piratic land settlement, or squatting, as critical to understanding mid- to late nineteenth-century conceptions of U.S. citizenship. To do so, I turn to the case of Californios living in the borderlands during and in the aftermath of the Mexican-American War of 1848, as represented in the work of María Amparo Ruiz de Burton, ...

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5. Queen Cotton: Smuggling and the Exigencies of Citizenship during the Civil War

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pp. 136-167

On April 19, 1861, Abraham Lincoln issued Proclamation 81, “A Blockade of Ports in Rebellious States,” which immediately affected the ports of South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Florida, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas.1 To justify the blockade, the proclamation boldly declared it a response to “a combination of persons engaged in such insurrection [who] have threatened ...

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Afterword: Pirates, Terrorists, Narcotraffickers

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pp. 168-174

On Friday, June 30, 1704, six pirates were executed along the Charles River in Boston, and their dying speeches were recorded, including the speech of one Captain John Quelch. Quelch states, “Gentlemen, ’tis but little I have to speak: what I have to say is this, I desire to be informed for what I am here, I am condemned only upon circumstances. ...

Notes

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pp. 175-204

Bibliography

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pp. 205-224

Index

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pp. 225-234