Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

List of Figures

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pp. ix-x

List of Tables

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pp. xi-xii

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1. A Porous Line: Exploring the Visual Representation of Cross-Cultural Interaction in Ancient Borderlands

Ulrike Matthies Green and Kirk E. Costion

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pp. 1-13

As with any collaborative work, this volume is the result of the hard work of many people. We are pleased to have been able to gather many of our colleagues who were willing to test and explore, modify and reshape, our model of illustrating cross-cultural interaction. The chapters of this book present how our colleagues have used and reviewed our ideas and how they have evolved. The graphic model that is the center of the discussions in this volume is the result of six years of collaboration on untangling the complexities of cross-cultural interactions in the Moquegua Valley during...

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2. Cross-Frontier Interactions in Roman Europe, AD 100–350: The Graphic Model Applied

Peter S. Wells

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pp. 14-34

The graphic model developed by Ulrike Green and Kirk Costion provides two valuable benefits to the study of the Roman frontier in Europe and of interactions across that frontier. One is in offering a means to present a very complex situation in a succinct, visually appreciable way. The second is that it forces a rethinking of ideas about the interactions between the variety of different groups that were active in temperate Europe between the final century BC and the fifth century AD. My focus here is on the middle of this period, when Rome was at its most powerful politically and...

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3. Modeling Differential Cultural Interaction in Late Bronze Age Thessaly

Bryan Feuer

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pp. 35-63

One of the most challenging aspects of studying peripheries is identifying, understanding, and characterizing interaction among the groups therein. Unlike centers or core zones, which tend to be more culturally and ethnically homogeneous, borders and frontiers may be characterized as areas where different groups exist and interact (Feuer 2016:8, 21–23). Therefore, cultural interaction in peripheral zones tends to be more complex, with more actors and more potential permutations than elsewhere.1 In order to track and account for such permutations, a model that orders interregional...

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4. Modeling Complex Cultural Encounters in Contact and Colonial Greenland, 1690–1900: Possibilities and Limitations of the Cross-Cultural Interaction Model

Peter Andreas Toft

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pp. 64-88

Foreign materials and objects are not only one of the key indicators of cultural encounters in archaeology but also in many cases one of the main motives behind the interaction between ethnic or social groups. Exchange, appropriation, and consumption of foreign materials, objects, and cultural practices has traditionally been the focus of cultural interaction studies, but in the last 20 years the theoretical perspective of these social processes has changed from world systems approaches, in which centers dominate peripheries, which are the scene of local passive acculturation,...

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5. Cross-Cultural Interaction in the Ancient Egyptian and Nubian Borderland

Stuart Tyson Smith and Michele R. Buzon

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pp. 89-113

Ancient Egypt and Nubia have a long history of interaction that led to both cultural and biological entanglements. Political boundaries shifted over time, with Egypt absorbing parts of its southern neighbor into an eventually far-reaching empire but also with independent Nubian kingdoms dominating Egypt at different periods, at one point with its kings ruling as pharaohs of Egypt’s Twenty-Fifth Dynasty. This essay examines the influences that flowed back and forth between Egyptian colonizers and indigenous Nubians, mapping the flows and intensity of cultural...

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6. Reconfiguring Regional Interactions in the Face of Cahokian Decline: A View from the Common Field Site, Missouri

Meghan E. Buchanan

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pp. 114-142

Theories concerning the rise and fall of Cahokia (Figure 6.1), the largest precolumbian polity north of Mexico, have historically focused on economic interaction models (Hall 1991; Kelly 1991; O’Brien 1972; Peregrine 1992), social evolutionary models of chiefdom development (Kelly 1990; Milner 1998), and models that emphasize the power and dominance of Cahokia over other polities (O’Brien 1989; Pauketat and Emerson 1997). However, recent research has emphasized that during the early years of Cahokia, regional interactions in the midwestern United States were...

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7. Conspicuous Consumption in Ancient Costa Rica and Panama

Scott Palumbo

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pp. 143-166

Ethnohistoric sources indicate that by the time of Spanish contact, many coastal areas and major river valleys in Costa Rica and Panama were home to politically complex societies, described generally as “chiefdoms.” These societies administered small territories, often within a few days’ travel of the political center, and exhibited some degree of social or occupational differentiation. Central American chiefs were important characters in the operation of political economies. They led raids for wealth and slaves, sponsored artisans, built alliances through marriages, and...

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8. Graphically Modeling the Prehistory of Regional Interactions in the Moquegua Valley, Southern Peru

Kirk E. Costion and Ulrike Matthies Green

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pp. 167-191

We originally developed the Cross-Cultural Interaction Model to help us understand the culturally dynamic early Middle Horizon (~AD 550–800) in the borderland of the Moquegua Valley of southern Peru (Green and Costion 2013, 2017). During this time period both the Wari and Tiwanaku polities established permanent colonies in this region, which was already inhabited by indigenous farming cultures known as the Huaracane in the middle valley and the Algodonal Early Ceramic in the coastal Osmore Valley (Feldman 1989; Goldstein 2000a, 2000b, 2005; Owen 1993, 2005,...

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9. Conclusion

Ulrike Matthies Green and Kirk E. Costion

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pp. 192-200

The primary goal of this volume was to test the effectiveness of the graphic model we call the Cross-Cultural Interaction Model (CCIM) in various multicultural landscapes around the world focusing on ancient frontier or borderland regions. The task for each of our contributors was to apply the CCIM to a variety of archaeological contexts and to make any necessary modifications to the model to best fit and/or explain the particulars of their individual case study. Our hope was that this exercise would demonstrate the wide applicability of the model. Furthermore, we believed that...

List of Contributors

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pp. 201-204

Index

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pp. 205-214