In this Book

Reclaiming Indigenous Research in Higher Education
summary
Indigenous students remain one of the least represented populations in higher education. They continue to account for only one percent of the total post-secondary student population, and this lack of representation is felt in multiple ways beyond enrollment. Less research money is spent studying Indigenous students, and their interests are often left out of projects that otherwise purport to address diversity in higher education. 

Recently, Native scholars have started to reclaim research through the development of their own research methodologies and paradigms that are based in tribal knowledge systems and values, and that allow inherent Indigenous knowledge and lived experiences to strengthen the research. Reclaiming Indigenous Research in Higher Education highlights the current scholarship emerging from these scholars of higher education. From understanding how Native American students make their way through school, to tracking tribal college and university transfer students, this book allows Native scholars to take center stage, and shines the light squarely on those least represented among us.  
 

Table of Contents

  1. Title Page, Copyright, Dedication
  2. pp. i-vi
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. vii-viii
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  1. Foreword
  2. Bryan McKinley Jones Brayboy (Lumbee)
  3. pp. ix-xiv
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  1. Introduction: The Roots of Reclamation
  2. Robin Starr Zape-tah-hol-ah Minthorn (Kiowa/Apache/Umatilla/Nez Perce/Assiniboine)
    Heather J. Shotton (Wichita/Kiowa/Cheyenne)
  3. pp. 1-6
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  1. Chapter 1: The Need for Indigenizing Research in Higher Education Scholarship
  2. Charlotte Davidson (Diné/Three Affiliated Tribes: Mandan/Hidatsa/Arikara)
    Heather J. Shotton (Wichita/Kiowa/Cheyenne)
    Robin Starr Zape-tah-hol-ah Minthorn (Kiowa/Apache/Umatilla/Nez Perce/Assiniboine)
    Stephanie Waterman (Onondaga, Turtle Clan)
  3. pp. 7-17
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  1. Chapter 2: “It Was a Process of Decolonization and That’s about as Clear as I Can Put It”: Kuleana-Centered Higher Education and the Meanings of Hawaiianness
  2. Erin Kahunawaikaʻala Wright (Native Hawaiian)
  3. pp. 18-35
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  1. Chapter 3: A Methodology of Beauty
  2. Charlotte Davidson (Diné/Three Affiliated Tribes: Mandan/Hidatsa/Arikara)
  3. pp. 36-46
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  1. Chapter 4: Understanding Relationships in the College Process: Indigenous Methodologies, Reciprocity, and College Horizons Students
  2. Adrienne Keene (Cherokee Nation)
  3. pp. 47-63
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  1. Chapter 5: Story Rug: Weaving Stories into Research
  2. Amanda R. Tachine (Navajo)
  3. pp. 64-75
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  1. Chapter 6: Stealing Horses: Indigenous Student Metaphors for Success in Graduate Education
  2. Sweeney Windchief (Assiniboine)
  3. pp. 76-87
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  1. Chapter 7: Predictors for American Indian/Alaska Native Student Leadership
  2. Theresa Jean Stewart (San Luis Rey Band of Mission Indians, Gabrieliño/Tongva)
  3. pp. 88-106
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  1. Chapter 8: Tribal College Pathways
  2. David Sanders (Oglala Sioux Tribe)
    Matthew Van Alstine Makomenaw (Grand Traverse Bay Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians)
  3. pp. 107-123
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  1. Chapter 9: Moving beyond Financial Aid to Support Native College Students: An Examination of the Gates Millennium Scholars Program
  2. Natalie Rose Youngbull (Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma)
  3. pp. 124-145
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  1. Chapter 10: The Intersection of Paying for College and Tribal Sovereignty: Exploring Native College Student Experiences with Tribal Financial Aid
  2. Christine A. Nelson (Laguna/Navajo)
  3. pp. 146-161
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  1. Chapter 11: Toward Equity and Equality: Transforming Universities into Indigenous Places of Learning
  2. Kaiwipunikauikawēkiu Lipe (Native Hawaiian)
  3. pp. 162-177
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  1. Chapter 12: Indigeneity in the Methods: Indigenous Feminist Theory in Content Analysis
  2. Stephanie Waterman (Onondaga, Turtle Clan)
  3. pp. 178-190
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  1. Chapter 13: Iḷisaġvik College: Alaska’s Only Tribal College
  2. Pearl Kiyawn Brower (Iñupiaq Eskimo/Chippewa/Armenian)
  3. pp. 191-205
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  1. Conclusion: Repositioning the Norms of the Academy: Research as Wisdom
  2. Heather J. Shotton (Wichita/Kiowa/Cheyenne)
    Robin Starr Zape-tah-hol-ah Minthorn (Kiowa/Apache/Umatilla/Nez Perce/Assiniboine)
  3. pp. 206-214
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  1. Notes on Contributors
  2. pp. 215-222
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 223-230
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