Cover

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Half Title, Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-vii

List of Illustrations

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pp. ix-x

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xi-xiv

This project has been a labor of love for more than a decade, and many people have helped support my work since its inception. Deep gratitude is extended to the staff at a number of archives in Mexico, the United States, and Europe. In Mexico: Gaby and staff at the Archivo Histórico del Estado de Jalisco; the Archivo General de la Nación (Mexico); ...

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Prologue

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pp. xv-xviii

According to Huichol oral culture, in the distant past a Huichol ancestor named Kauyaumari journeyed to Wirikuta to fulfill religious obligations that his gods required of him. Wirikuta, infused with mystical power, was the home of Tamatsi Maxa Kwaxí (Elder Brother Deer Tail) and the birthplace of Tayaupá (Our Father the Sun).1 While on his pilgrimage Kauyaumari ...

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Introduction

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pp. xix-xxx

The Huichols’ physical world comprises varying landscapes and, at first glance, the environment appears rugged, wild, and desolate. Alongside the highways that weave through the state of San Luis Potosí, soaring peaks rise above the valley floor and the sun scorches the dry, dusty earth. ...

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1. From Native Neighbors to Spanish Conquerors

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pp. 1-18

The Huichols and other indigenous peoples who lived beyond the valley of Mexico, in the mountains and deserts to the north of Tenochtitlán, remained just out of the Aztecs’ reach. Yet the Aztecs knew about the various peoples, whom they termed “Chichimeca” (Chichimecatl, Nahuatl, sing.), a catchall phrase; through trade relationships that spread throughout Mesoamerica, ...

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2. Facing the Young Nation-State

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pp. 19-34

In 1822 a group of Huichols visiting Tepic to trade encountered a British traveler name Basil Hall. This was likely their first encounter with a foreigner who was not a Spaniard, a Mexican, a priest, or a soldier. Hall took a keen interest in the Huichols that he met; the Huichols demonstrated their typical indifference upon meeting the English-speaking stranger. ...

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3. Between Tolerance and Rejection of the Church

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pp. 35-48

In an 1839 letter to the bishop of Guadalajara, Fray Vicente BuenaventuraCárdenas lamented the conditions he found in the Sierra Huichola. Buenaventura had experience evangelizing with other indigenous groups in the area, such as the Coras, who had more or less accepted evangelization since their subjugation in the eighteenth century, but he could not make ...

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4. In Defense of Lands

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pp. 49-66

Evidence of the tensions generated by land encroachment came in the form of periodic episodes of violence. In 1854 unknown assailants murdered don Benito del Hoyo, proprietor of the Hacienda San Antonio de Padua, and three of his sons.1 Del Hoyo had been a thorn in the sides of area indigenous peoples, particularly the Huichols, because his workers continually strayed ...

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5. Foreign Scholars as Tools of Resistance

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pp. 67-80

By 1900 Huichols living in Santa Catarina had grown weary of outsiders over the previous decades. Land speculators, priests, and even fellow Huichols created problems for them, and they seemed to grow increasingly insular. This was their defense mechanism, to build a figurative wall between themselves and others, shutting out what threatened their existence. ...

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6. A Revolution Comes to the Huichols

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pp. 81-94

Huichol ceremonies are colorful, vibrant affairs, from the fiestas celebrating the return of peyoteros to marriages. “Woven bands, kerchiefs, and clothing are taken to the girl’s parents. The groom makes his own house before the wedding occurs. At the wedding, he receives a bead collar from his wife and gives one in return. These collars are buried with them at death. ...

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Conclusion

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pp. 95-102

In May 2011 Wixárika leaders acted on a serious situation that had plagued them for several years. The Regional Wixárika Council for the Defense of Wirikuta wrote to President Felipe Calderón and other presidents and peoples of the world to explain the significance of Wirikuta and the devastation that mining would cause if First Majestic Mining Corporation ...

Notes

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pp. 103-150

Bibliography

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pp. 151-162

Index

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pp. 163-177

Image Plates

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