Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Series Page, Copyright, Dedication, Epigraph

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. i-vi

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-xiv

When I began my research on listening years ago, I heard poet Lucille Clifton speak at an event in honor of poet Sterling A. Brown. Her words resonate with me still: “One of the things I have learned to do in my life is listen. I listened to what guided me.” I am grateful to her and to the...

read more

“Attuned to It All”: Embodied Listening and Listening in Print

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-18

Each time I return to Toni Morrison’s Playing in the Dark, I linger over her reflection on Marie Cardinal’s The Words to Say It. In her autobiographical novel of psychological illness and healing, Cardinal recalls attending a Louis Armstrong concert where she experiences what she terms “her first...

read more

1. “Our Literary Audience”: Listenership in Zora Neale Hurston’s Their Eyes Were Watching God and Sterling Brown’s “Ma Rainey”

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 19-40

In 1973, Alice Walker, then just twenty-nine years old and still nine years from publishing The Color Purple, set out to Fort Pierce, Florida, to find Zora Neale Hurston’s unmarked grave. Walker’s essay “Looking for Zora” chronicles this challenging search for Hurston’s resting place. Determined to recover...

read more

2. “To Hear the Silence of Sound”: Vibrational Listening in Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 41-58

Published in 1952 to great critical acclaim, Invisible Man was touted as an immediate literary classic that placed racial issues at the center of the nation’s story. Compelling in its representation of the psychological and cultural effects of segregation in the United States, Invisible Man highlights invisibility...

read more

3. When Malindy Listens: Audiographic Archiving in Gayl Jones’s Corregidora

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 59-80

In her essay “When Malindy Sings,” Farah Jasmine Griffin meditates on black women vocalists—their voice and performing presence—as prominent persons on the national stage. Citing such monumental performances as Marian Anderson’s appearance at the Lincoln Memorial in 1939 or...

read more

4. “If I Allow Myself to Listen”: Slavery, Historical Thinking, and Aural Encounters in David Bradley’s The Chaneysville Incident

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 81-106

At a particularly arresting moment in David Bradley’s 1981 novel, The Chaneysville Incident, narrator and historian John Washington ruminates on the potential eternal consequences of a brutal slave trade for both the enslaver and the enslaved. According to John, “even so knowledgeable a historian...

read more

5. “New Ways to Make Us Listen”: Aural Learning in the English Classroom

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 107-118

For the characters in James Baldwin’s 1965 short story “Sonny’s Blues,” listening is learning, and one of their classrooms is a Greenwich Village club. The story’s unnamed narrator visits the club to listen as his younger brother, Sonny, plays piano during a blues set, his first following a hiatus from...

read more

“All Living Is Listening”: Toward an Aurally Engaged Citizenry

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 119-120

On Tuesday, January 10, 2017, Barack Obama delivered his final address as president of the United States.1 That evening in Chicago, he spoke of the racial divisiveness that continues to threaten American democracy, asserting that “we’re not where we need to be. All of us have more...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 121-146

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 147-162

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 163-168