Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

Illustrations, Maps, and Tables

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pp. ix-x

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xi-xvi

Anyone who has spent time with me over the past five years knows that this book was a collaborative labor of love that would not have been possible without the generous support of several dozen intelligent, committed individuals. A list of the community of friends and colleagues with whom I had the privilege to collaborate during my year of fieldwork ...

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Introduction. Diasporic Placemaking in the Renaissance City of the South

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pp. 1-16

What does it mean to say that a city’s evolution is the result of centuries of multiple and overlapping instances of diasporic placemaking? And why ask this question in the context of Chattanooga, a small and relatively unknown city nestled between the Tennessee River and Lookout Mountain in the southeastern corner of Tennessee? ...

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Chapter One. Settling Chattanooga: Race, Property, and Cherokee Dispossession

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pp. 17-33

For several thousand years, the banks of the Tennessee River where Lookout Mountain faces Stringer’s Ridge has been a cradle for human civilization. Its unique geography and rich natural resources have made it highly desirable for settlement: Native artifacts discovered in sites across present-day downtown Chattanooga date back to at least 0–499 ACE, ...

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Chapter Two. Rooting a Black Diaspora in Downtown Chattanooga 1540–1890

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pp. 34-52

While Chattanooga was a point of departure for the Cherokee and southeastern Native diaspora, it was also a point of arrival for members of the African diaspora, whose presence in the Chattanooga area dates back to Hernando De Soto’s exploration up the Tennessee River in 1541. Between the sixteenth and early nineteenth centuries, encounters between European ...

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Chapter Three. Cosmopolitanism as Concealment: The Dynamo of Dixie during Jim Crow, 1890–1968

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pp. 53-67

By the turn of the twentieth century, city boosters had refined their interracial harmony pitch to investors. The City Guide published in 1900 meant to attract capital into the “Dynamo of Dixie” by similarly stressing the economic, social, and cultural opportunities available for African Americans. The authors bragged, “Chattanooga Negroes are on every economic level. ...

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Chapter Four. Defying Racist Stereotypes: The Big Nine and Lincoln Park as Sites of Diasporic Cosmopolitanism

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pp. 68-84

The 1858 opening of the Union Passenger Station at the intersection of Ninth and Broad Streets had a profound impact on the development of black neighborhoods and commercial districts across downtown Chattanooga. Nowhere was this change more evident than along “the Big Nine,” a section of East Ninth Street that evolved into one of the South’s ...

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Chapter Five. Singing a Big Nine Blues Revolution

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pp. 85-114

As the most heavily industrialized city in the Southeast, Chattanooga suffered dramatically as the city transitioned away from a manufacturing-based economy during the second half of the twentieth century. Chattanooga sustained immense damages following the global economic restructuring of 1973. As international trade barriers were lifted and the world opened ...

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Chapter Six. Chattanooga Homecoming: Citizen-Driven Planning along the Tennessee Riverfront

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pp. 115-126

Following the removal of the Cherokee in 1838, Chattanooga’s riverfront industrialized. By the turn of the twentieth century, much of the downtown riverfront was occupied by heavy, water-dependent manufacturing facilities. The properties adjacent to Ross’s Landing underwent several transformations over 150 years, serving as locations for: goods, grain, ...

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Chapter Seven. Public Space, Cultural Development, and Reconciliation Politics in the Renaissance City

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pp. 127-142

On February 12, 2002, the City of Chattanooga announced it had awarded a ninety-day, $250,000 planning contract to Cambridge, Massachusetts-based planning and landscape architecture firm Hargreaves Associates. The contract hired the firm to explore expanded revitalization and public access along the downtown Tennessee riverfront. ...

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Chapter Eight. From Rabble-Rousing to SPARCing Community Transformation: The Evolution of Chattanooga Organized for Action

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pp. 143-161

Chattanooga Organized for Action (COA) began with a simple yet elusive mission. According to former executive director Perrin Lance, “We decided that we wanted to bring protest culture back into the City of Chattanooga.”1 Over the next several months, the group staged demonstrations against the BP oil spill, bank bailouts, and political corruption, ...

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Chapter Nine. The Politics of Black Self-Determination and Neighborhood Preservation in Lincoln Park

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pp. 162-185

If the historical development of Lincoln Park during the first half of the twentieth century illustrated the public sector’s power to provide high-quality services and facilities for Chattanooga’s black community, the postwar decades showed its power to just as quickly redirect and withdraw that support. Several chapters of this book have discussed the complex ...

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Conclusion

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pp. 186-194

To return to the opening pages of this book, the five-hundred-year-long history of urban development and change in Chattanooga, Tennessee, has been complex, heterogeneous, and uneven. At its core, the city’s evolution has been propelled by dif­ferent uprooted and migratory populations carving out communities of material security and cultural belonging from their ...

Appendix 1. Theorizing Diasporic Placemaking

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pp. 195-206

Appendix 2. Methodology

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pp. 207-212

Notes

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pp. 213-230

Bibliography

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pp. 231-240

Index

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pp. 241-246

Photographs

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