In this Book

Constructing the Dynamo of Dixie
summary
What can local histories of interracial conflict and collaboration teach us about the potential for urban equity and social justice in the future? Courtney Elizabeth Knapp chronicles the politics of gentrification and culture-based development in Chattanooga, Tennessee, by tracing the roots of racism, spatial segregation, and mainstream "cosmopolitanism" back to the earliest encounters between the Cherokee, African Americans, and white settlers. For more than three centuries, Chattanooga has been a site for multiracial interaction and community building; yet today public leaders have simultaneously restricted and appropriated many contributions of working-class communities of color within the city, exacerbating inequality and distrust between neighbors and public officials. Knapp suggests that "diasporic placemaking"—defined as the everyday practices through which uprooted people create new communities of security and belonging—is a useful analytical frame for understanding how multiracial interactions drive planning and urban development in diverse cities over time. By weaving together archival, ethnographic, and participatory action research techniques, she reveals the political complexities of a city characterized by centuries of ordinary resistance to racial segregation and uneven geographic development.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Title Page, Copyright, Dedication
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. vii-viii
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  1. Illustrations, Maps, and Tables
  2. pp. ix-x
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. xi-xvi
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  1. Introduction. Diasporic Placemaking in the Renaissance City of the South
  2. pp. 1-16
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  1. Chapter One. Settling Chattanooga: Race, Property, and Cherokee Dispossession
  2. pp. 17-33
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  1. Chapter Two. Rooting a Black Diaspora in Downtown Chattanooga 1540–1890
  2. pp. 34-52
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  1. Chapter Three. Cosmopolitanism as Concealment: The Dynamo of Dixie during Jim Crow, 1890–1968
  2. pp. 53-67
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  1. Chapter Four. Defying Racist Stereotypes: The Big Nine and Lincoln Park as Sites of Diasporic Cosmopolitanism
  2. pp. 68-84
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  1. Chapter Five. Singing a Big Nine Blues Revolution
  2. pp. 85-114
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  1. Chapter Six. Chattanooga Homecoming: Citizen-Driven Planning along the Tennessee Riverfront
  2. pp. 115-126
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  1. Chapter Seven. Public Space, Cultural Development, and Reconciliation Politics in the Renaissance City
  2. pp. 127-142
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  1. Chapter Eight. From Rabble-Rousing to SPARCing Community Transformation: The Evolution of Chattanooga Organized for Action
  2. pp. 143-161
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  1. Chapter Nine. The Politics of Black Self-Determination and Neighborhood Preservation in Lincoln Park
  2. pp. 162-185
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  1. Conclusion
  2. pp. 186-194
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  1. Appendix 1. Theorizing Diasporic Placemaking
  2. pp. 195-206
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  1. Appendix 2. Methodology
  2. pp. 207-212
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 213-230
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  1. Bibliography
  2. pp. 231-240
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 241-246
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  1. Photographs
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