Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xii

This book’s long progression from thoughts to pages could not have been completed without the help of many individuals. Those named here are only a few among the many deserving of thanks. So to anyone who ever listened to me ramble on about honor, please accept my utmost gratitude and apologies. ...

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Introduction: What Are Honor, Virtue, and Ethics and How Did They Influence the American Revolution?

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pp. 1-21

From the Sons of Liberty to the Son of Thunder, crisis had brought them to Philadelphia. Years of resentment and demands of liberty sparked the rattle of carriages and the thump of horseshoes from all corners of the thirteen colonies. Delegates from each of the colonies gathered in the Pennsylvania capital for a “general congress” ready to resist Great Britain ...

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Chapter One. The Old World Meets the New: Colonial Ethical Ideals before the Revolution

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pp. 22-46

In the idyllic French village of Passy, a short distance from Paris and a stopping point en route to the royal splendor of Versailles, a seventy-eight-year-old Benjamin Franklin sat within the palatial Hotel de Valentinois. He had been a nonpaying resident of “le petit hôtel,” as a guest of Donatien le Rey de Chaumont (a friend of King Louis XVI), ...

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Chapter Two. A Shared Identity: Colonial Colleges and the Shaping of Pre-Revolutionary Thought

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pp. 47-64

Benjamin Franklin and George Washington were, in large part, a product of their own efforts and environments. Meanwhile, most of the prominent American Revolutionary leadership had formal schooling, and even attended college; some were educated in Britain, but the vast majority remained in the colonies for school. ...

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Chapter Three. A Matter of Honor and a Test of Virtue: Riots, Boycotts, and Resistance during the Coming of the Revolution

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pp. 65-97

The year 1763 marked the end of the French and Indian War, a conflict that fundamentally changed the British Empire’s relationship with the American colonies. The colonists initially viewed the British victory in the war as an opportunity to improve their standing within the empire. What resulted was stricter regulation and subjugation. ...

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Chapter Four. Maintaining Moral Superiority: How Ethics Defined the Early War Years

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pp. 98-126

Shortly after the Battles of Lexington and Concord, but before the signing of the Declaration of Independence, the women of New England were very clear on how the war would manifest itself. Mercy Otis Warren wrote a poignant letter to a friend in which she prophesied that the American Revolution would be “a test” against the British “shackles” that “Their Honour” despises. ...

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Chapter Five. From Tension to Victory: Overcoming Civilian and Martial Differences on Honor and Virtue during the Later War Years

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pp. 127-166

Although honor and virtue continued to be the guiding principles for America during the early years of the war, the patriot record on the battlefield was less than encouraging. By the fall of 1777, the American cause had been dealt crushing blows, resulting most prominently in the British occupation of New York and the U.S. capital of Philadelphia. ...

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Chapter Six. Expanding Ethics: The Democratization of Honor and Virtue in the New Republic

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pp. 167-211

The American victory at Yorktown, while technically not the official end of the war, brought the combatants to the peace table. Talks began in April 1782. While it was a time of hope and optimism for the Americans, there was still apprehension over the manner in which the war would be concluded. In Paris, the United States’ peace commission, comprising Benjamin Franklin, ...

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Chapter Seven. The Counterrevolution in American Ethics: Reinterpretations of the Next Generations

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pp. 212-240

Following the turmoil of the Constitutional Convention and the French Revolution, American partisanship was firmly divided between Federalists and Republicans. From political jostling came two conflicting visions of national honor; soon debate and recriminations surrounding national honor digressed into personal matters of honor. ...

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Epilogue: March 16, 1824

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pp. 241-246

Only months before his first attempt at the presidency, the “Hero of New Orleans,” the most celebrated figure of the War of 1812, had traveled to Washington, D.C.—the nation’s capital and concurrently the site of America’s most embarrassing defeat. Within the President’s House, a structure no longer marred by the charring or shame of British torches, ...

Notes

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pp. 247-304

Bibliography

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pp. 305-358

Index

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pp. 359-368