In this Book

summary
"Aloha" is at once the most significant and the most misunderstood word in the Indigenous Hawaiian lexicon. For K&257;naka Maoli people, the concept of "aloha" is a representation and articulation of their identity, despite its misappropriation and commandeering by non-Native audiences in the form of things like the "hula girl" of popular culture. Considering the way aloha is embodied, performed, and interpreted in Native Hawaiian literature, music, plays, dance, drag performance, and even ghost tours from the twentieth century to the present, Stephanie Nohelani Teves shows that misunderstanding of the concept by non-Native audiences has not prevented the K&257;naka Maoli from using it to create and empower community and articulate its distinct Indigenous meaning.

While Native Hawaiian artists, activists, scholars, and other performers have labored to educate diverse publics about the complexity of Indigenous Hawaiian identity, ongoing acts of violence against Indigenous communities have undermined these efforts. In this multidisciplinary work, Teves argues that Indigenous peoples must continue to embrace the performance of their identities in the face of this violence in order to challenge settler-colonialism and its efforts to contain and commodify Hawaiian Indigeneity.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Title Page, Series Page, Copyright, Dedication
  2. pp. i-vi
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. vii-x
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  1. Preface. Throwing Mangoes at Tourists
  2. pp. xi-xvi
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. xvii-xx
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  1. Introduction. How to Do Things with Aloha
  2. pp. 1-22
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  1. 1. F-You Aloha, I Love You
  2. pp. 23-47
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  1. 2. Bloodline Is All I Need and Defiant Indigeneity on the West Side
  2. pp. 48-80
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  1. 3. Aloha in Drag
  2. pp. 81-112
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  1. 4. The Afterlife of Princess Ka‘iulani
  2. pp. 113-144
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  1. 5. Bound in Place: Queer Indigenous Mobilities and “The Old Paniolo Way”
  2. pp. 145-169
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  1. Conclusion. Aloha as Social Connection
  2. pp. 170-176
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 177-194
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  1. Bibliography
  2. pp. 195-208
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 209-220
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Additional Information

ISBN
9781469640570
Print ISBN
9781469640549
MARC Record
OCLC
1028956434
Pages
240
Launched on MUSE
2018-03-19
Language
English
Open Access
N
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