Cover

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Title Page, Series Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-x

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Preface. Throwing Mangoes at Tourists

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pp. xi-xvi

I grew up across the street from the most visited tourist site in the Western Pacific, the USS Arizona Memorial, a U.S. National Monument located at Pearl Harbor, where two million tourists visit annually. Kānaka Maoli (Native Hawaiians) called this area Pu‘uloa (the many waters of the long hill...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xvii-xx

The aloha and kōkua of so many people supported this research. The labor of these performers, writers, and thinkers is often overlooked and dismissed within Hawaiian worlds, as is the extended community of folks who share these performance spaces. I want to acknowledge especially Cocoa Chandelier...

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Introduction. How to Do Things with Aloha

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pp. 1-22

In Hawai‘i, the commercialized spirit of aloha is both pervasive and a little perverse, its invocations deployed to sell everything from hula skirts to plumbing services. My personal favorite is Aloha Exterminators, a termite and pest control company on the island of O‘ahu. Aloha is also used to sell...

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1. F-You Aloha, I Love You

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pp. 23-47

This excerpt from a poem by Juliana Spahr, a haole woman from Ohio and a University of Hawai‘i English professor from 1997 to 2003, encapsulates the paradox of the aloha spirit. Moving from stating the significance of “things” and then to an acknowledgment of how those things expose something...

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2. Bloodline Is All I Need and Defiant Indigeneity on the West Side

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pp. 48-80

On June 17, 2011, the Honolulu Star-Advertiser published a review of the Kanaka Maoli rapper Krystilez’s release “Dear hara” along with an image of him with a piece of duct tape over his mouth that read “aloha” in capital letters.1 Exhibiting the tensions embodied in Hawaiian indigeneity and...

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3. Aloha in Drag

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pp. 81-112

In an old Chinese restaurant converted into a hip loft nightclub that overlooks North Hotel and Maunakea Street in Honolulu’s Chinatown, Cocoa Chandelier1 staged a confessional. “Cocoa Chandelier’s Confessional” (on August 14, 2009, Madonna’s forty-ninth birthday) featured Cocoa Chandelier...

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4. The Afterlife of Princess Ka‘iulani

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pp. 113-144

Princess Victoria Kawēkiu Ka‘iulani Kalaninuiahilapalapa Cleghorn died on March 6, 1899, of an apparent case of pneumonia brought on by her previous condition of inflammatory rheumatism. Her death was a result of horseback riding in the rain in Waimea on the Big Island of Hawai‘i, or...

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5. Bound in Place: Queer Indigenous Mobilities and “The Old Paniolo Way”

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pp. 145-169

According to the 2010 U.S. Census, 45 percent of self-identified Native Hawaiians live outside of Hawai‘i, a proportion that has nearly doubled since 1990.1 One-third of off-island Kānaka Maoli live in California and nearby states. Economic realities such as the high cost of living in Hawai‘i and increased...

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Conclusion. Aloha as Social Connection

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pp. 170-176

When I began this research in 2007, looking at how blood, identity, and claims to place were articulated in Krystilez’s song “Bloodline,” I presented many of the critiques that flow throughout this book, namely, that claims to place interweave with expressions of indigeneity that are administered...

Notes

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pp. 177-194

Bibliography

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pp. 195-208

Index

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pp. 209-220