Cover

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Title Page, Series Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-x

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xi-xiv

I would like to thank each of the contributors to this collection. As with previous volumes, the authors include both public and academic historians. Many are veterans of this series. A handful are welcome new additions. All have been gracious and professional, and I am indebted to all of them. I likewise...

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Introduction

Caroline E. Janney

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pp. 1-12

Taking pen in hand on the evening of April 9, 1865, Capt. Henry A. Chambers of the 49th North Carolina could scarcely believe what he was about to write. “Today the ‘Army of Northern Virginia,’ the best army we Southerners have, was surrendered,” he began. For a week he had pushed west watching the...

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1. Grant Finally Takes Command: How the Race to Appomattox Was Won

William W. Bergen

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pp. 13-40

The enduring popular image of Ulysses S. Grant is of a taciturn, humorless, even colorless general who nonetheless became one of the most effective commanders in history. Though remembered for wearing “an expression as if he had determined to drive his head through a brick wall, and was about to...

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2. We Can Keep All the Yankees Back That They Can Send: Morale among Hood’s Texas Brigade’s Soldiers and Their Families, 1864–1865

Susannah J. Ural

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pp. 41-82

James Tiner was a thirty-five-year-old farmer in Concord, Texas, in March 1862 when he accepted a bounty to join Company F of the 1st Texas Infantry. Unlike many younger, unmarried men inspired by patriotism, regional pride, or a desire for adventure to join the Confederate ranks when the war began...

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3. A Whole Lot of Blame to Go Around: The Confederate Collapse at Five Forks

Peter S. Carmichael

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pp. 83-109

While Confederate major general George E. Pickett was finishing his plate of fried fish at a shad bake, Union major general Philip H. Sheridan was devouring Pickett’s command at Five Forks. The sounds of the Federal assault were supposedly silenced by abnormal atmospheric conditions called an acoustic...

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4. Lucky Inspiration: Philip Sheridan’s Uncertain Road to Triumph with the Cavalry of the Army of the Potomac

Wayne Wei-Siang Hsieh

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pp. 110-137

A deceptive anticlimax enshrouds the Appomattox campaign. While it resulted in the final defeat of Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia, we might easily forgive historians for glancing over the operational details of the last spring campaign in Virginia. Even historians such as James McPherson...

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5. Lee, Breckinridge, and Campbell: The Confederate Peacemakers of 1865

William C. Davis

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pp. 138-169

The Confederate surrenders came entirely on terms dictated by the victors. Generous though their provisions were in the circumstances, some Confederate leaders had hoped for more. A small group of them led by the legendary Gen. Robert E. Lee, the immensely popular Secretary of War John C...

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6. Many Valuable Records and Documents Were Lost to History: The Destruction of Confederate Military Records during the Appomattox Campaign

Keith Bohannon

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pp. 170-191

On the morning of April 7, 1865, during the Appomattox campaign, Union colonel Theodore Lyman of Maj. Gen. George Meade’s staff rode through the wreckage of a collapsing Confederate army. The road followed by Lyman’s party, which included Meade, was “completely strewed with tents, ammunition...

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7. We Were Not Paroled: The Surrenders of Lee’s Men beyond Appomattox Court House

Caroline E. Janney

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pp. 192-219

When Lt. N. B. Bowyer of Company G, 10th Virginia Cavalry, learned that Gen. Robert E. Lee had ordered his men to cease firing on the morning of April 9, 1865, in order to surrender to Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, he quit the war. “I took the battle flag of the old regiment from the color-bearer, cut it...

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8. Sheridan’s Personal Memoirs and the Appomattox Campaign

Stephen Cushman

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pp. 220-253

“Dear Sir: / I beg to introduce you to Mr. C. L. Webster, who may not succeed with the conspiracy which he has in mind, but I very much hope he will.” Dated December 26, 1884, in Hartford, Connecticut, this brief letter from Mark Twain to fifty-three-year-old Philip H. Sheridan apparently envisioned...

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9. The Last Hour of the Slaveholders’ Rebellion: African American Discourse on Lee’s Surrender

Elizabeth R. Varon

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pp. 254-284

On January 2, 1888, the Reverend E. K. Love, a Georgia Baptist, addressed a gathering of African Americans in Savannah, convened to celebrate the anniversary of Lincoln’s January 1, 1863, Emancipation Proclamation. He began by noting that “this day’s celebration necessarily calls up the past”—and he...

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Bibliographic Essay

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pp. 285-290

Readers hoping to further explore the final months of the war in the Eastern Theater should first consult the notes for each of the essays, which collectively cover a wide range of primary and secondary sources.
As with all of the books in the Military Campaigns of the Civil War series, the...

Contributors

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pp. 291-292

Index

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pp. 293-305