Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. i-vi

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

Abbreviations

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-xii

read more

Preface and Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xiii-xvi

Back in 2007, when I first arrived in Rabat, the plan was to study processes of democratization in both Egypt and Morocco. What’s more, the case of Morocco was actually more of a second option, a comparative by-product of the real case I wanted to explore: Egypt.

However, parliamentary elections took place in Morocco in the first year of this research and my colleague Sami Zemni convinced me to go. I could postpone Egypt for a later date. “Rabat will be a soft landing compared to Cairo,” he told me. The rest is history. In the concurrence...

read more

INTRODUCTION: Morocco‘s Urban Revolution

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-26

On September 15, 2013, in the morning, while entering the station of Casa-Port, I saw the new high-rises of Casablanca Marina out my window. Although still under construction, they already transformed Casablanca’s skyline radically. Casablanca Marina is situated just in front of the old medina between the harbor and the impressive Mosque Hassan II. The medina, the old city that predates the French protectorate, with its robust stone walls, narrow streets, and numerous small shops, will be hidden from now on behind a new city panorama of concrete and glass....

Part I. Neoliberalism As Projects

read more

1. Considering The Global Situation

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 29-52

Scholars on the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region addressing the problem of democracy and political change have surprisingly, for a region that has always been the middle point of geopolitical interests, little to say about the global situation. Or, more precisely, they have little to say about capitalist globalization and the place of the region therein. I do not mean to suggest that there are no important contributions dealing with issues of neoliberalism or global capitalism. Yet when it comes to the understanding of politics in the MENA region, they often stay...

read more

2. An Urban History of Neoliberal Projects in Morocco

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 53-92

Through the urban lens I want to understand other kinds of problems: neoliberalism; the state; government in contemporary societies, especially in the Global South; and, finally, uneven development.

One might say, compared to other regions in the world, that dynamics of urbanization remain an overlooked topic within the broader literature on political life in the Arab region. Nevertheless, there is a growing group of scholars within a broad range of disciplines that look at different aspects of urban life in the region to understand contemporary societal...

Part II. (State-)Crafting Globalization

read more

3. Neoliberalism as Class Projects

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 95-122

Neoliberal urban projects are class projects that (re)produce uneven development and transform authoritarianism and state power in Morocco. Most visibly, neoliberal projects play a central role in the production of a wider geography of inequality and difference between a contemporary Maroc utile (mainly the large coastal cities) and a Maroc inutile (the rural hinterland and the smaller villages and towns). But also within large coastal cities, these projects reproduce and exacerbate social and...

read more

4. Imagineering a New Bouregreg Valley

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 123-162

At the heart of two cities, the capital Rabat and its neighbor Salé, the valley of the Bouregreg River is the place for the largest urban renewal project in the history of Morocco. A historic natural barrier between the imperial city of Rabat and the notorious pirates of Salé, the river valley now portends the eventual reconciliation of two rival cities, a historic rivalry that shapes the identity of both the Rbatis and the Slaouis to this very day. While Rabat is the seat of government and central power, Salé, although larger in population, is a dormitory city in...

Part III. Transforming Urban Life

read more

5. Changing Methods of Authoritarian Power

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 165-204

In chapter 2 I describe a transition from a phase of roll-back neoliberalism (with projects aiming to dismantle developmentalism) to a phase of roll-out neoliberalism (with projects involved in the creation of a new order). The latter was characterized not only by a transformation of state institutional power (e.g., the Bouregreg arrangement) but also by the aim to transform urban life itself. This entailed a fundamental shift in methods of power and techniques of government. While the reign of Hassan II and the policies of structural adjustment were predominantly...

read more

6. Power and Control through Techniques of Security

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 205-244

A key argument in this book is that we can distinguish a governmental shift in the ways the city, and slums particularly, are governed over the last three decades and that this shift illustrates broader shifts within neoliberalism itself.1 More specifically, this governmental shift illustrates the transition from a phase of roll-back neoliberalism in which the governmental apparatuses and mechanisms of state developmentalism were dismantled to a phase of roll-out neoliberalism characterized by the creation of new “apparatuses of security” aiming to consolidate neoliberal...

read more

CONCLUSION: A New Geography of Power

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 245-258

The aim of this book is to understand both neoliberal globalization and the transformation of authoritarian government. Despite the fact that these two abstract phenomena inform the work of so many political scientists, geographers, anthropologists, economists, area specialists, and others, their convergence in the Arab region remains understudied and often poorly understood.

Of course, there is a strong awareness about the impact of globalization in the region, especially when it relates to geopolitics. Nevertheless,...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 259-276

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 277-304

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 305-326

About the Author

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 327