Cover

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Title Page, Series Page, Copyright

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Author’s Note

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pp. vii-viii

The two books that precede this one, De Dagboeken van Anne Frank (1986) [the Dutch critical edition of the diary] and Anne Frank voor beginners and gevorderden (1998) [Anne Frank for beginners and for advanced students] cite a lot of source material. The first book deals primarily with...

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Translator’s Note

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pp. ix-x

I have followed the author’s lead. When the author says that he has not used footnotes and has based various chapters partly on previous publications, I have done the same. The principal source for much of this book was the critical edition of the diary. Instead of the Dutch critical edition...

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Introduction

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pp. xi-xviii

On Sunday, April 27, 2014, amid great public interest, a cutting from the famous “Anne Frank tree” was planted in the garden of the Capitol in Washington, DC. Many seedlings of this chestnut tree had been cultivated after it blew down in the summer of 2010. The United States received eleven in...

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1. Frankfurt—Amsterdam—Bergen-Belsen

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pp. 1-15

The Frank family officially moved to Amsterdam in August 1933, but for Otto, Anne’s father, it wasn’t the first time he lived there. Otto Heinrich Frank, born on May 12, 1889, in Frankfurt am Main, was the second son of bank director Michael Frank (1851–1909) and Alice Betty Stern (1865–1953)...

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2. Anne Frank: From Diary to Het Achterhuis/Das Tagebuch/ Le Journal/The Diary

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pp. 16-31

“[I] keep trying to find a way to become what I’d like to be and what I could be if . . . if only there were no other people in the world.” Those were the last words that Anne wrote in her diary on August 1, 1944, three days before the raid directed by the Germans. On June 25, 1947, her father wrote...

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3. Anne Frank on Broadway: The Play

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pp. 32-45

A radio drama about Anne Frank, written by Meyer Levin, was broadcast by CBS on September 14, 1952. Two months later, Anne’s diary was broadcast in a dramatized form on television by NBC. Both broadcasts were most likely presented without Otto Frank’s knowledge, let alone his...

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4. Anne Frank in Hollywood: The Movie

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pp. 46-55

On October 18, 1942, Anne writes next to a small photo in her first diary: “This is a photo of me as I would like to look all the time. Then I might have a chance of getting to Hollywood. But at present, unfortunately, I usually look quite different.”
In “Delusions of Stardom,” a story that Anne wrote...

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5. Anne’s Diary under Attack

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pp. 56-77

When the diary of Anne Frank was not yet world famous, no one doubted its authenticity or Anne’s short existence. After the publication of Das Tagebuch in Germany in 1959, there certainly were questions about her toomature language. The translator was usually blamed, and deservedly...

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6. Who Owns Anne Frank?

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pp. 78-106

Until Otto Frank’s death in 1980, there seemed to be a clear image of Anne Frank in the world. On the one hand, it was shaped by the compilation of her diaries by Otto Frank, and on the other hand by the American play. Meyer Levin tried to put his stamp on Anne’s person by making a stage version...

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7. A Girls’ Book or Literature?

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pp. 107-111

The editors of the critical edition of the diary have sometimes been reproached for not remarking on the name Kitty, the person to whom Anne addressed her diary: “Scholars have long ignored the fact that Anne Frank in her diary with her letters to Kitty chose a character from Joop ter Heul...

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8 How to Continue in the Twenty-First Century?

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pp. 112-116

The evolution of Anne’s image is not linear, and it obviously differs from country to country. Who or what is Anne Frank? A gifted young writer, an ordinary Jewish girl who became a victim of the Holocaust, a moral guide after Auschwitz and Hiroshima? One can imagine a common denominator...

Bibliography

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pp. 117-122

Index

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pp. 123-128