Cover

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Title Page, Frontispiece, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

List of Interviews

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pp. ix-x

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Preface

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pp. xi-xviii

The Mariel boatlift can be described as one of the largest exoduses of modern history and is undoubtedly Latin America's largest sea-borne migration in such a short period of time. More than 125,000 Cubans left their homeland through the Mariel Port in less than six months lookingely...

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1. A History of the Mariel Boatlift

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pp. 1-14

On April 1, 1980, Hector Sanyustiz stopped the bus he was driving in the residential area of Miramar in Havana. His heart pounded as he put his plan in motion. He looked at his companion Raul, and four others entered the bus. A trickle of sweat dripped down his spine as he grippedely...

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2. José García: A Boy’s Journey

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pp. 15-35

The day my family received news of my uncle Manuel's arrival at the Port of Mariel and our last few weeks in Cuba were some of the most dramatic and significant times of my life. My quiet neighborhood with its cobblestone streets in the colonial part of Sancti Spiritus, my hometown, began...

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3. Manuel Morillo: Twenty-Five Days in Mariel and a Failed Rescue

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pp. 36-42

I was born in Sancti Spiritus, Cuba. I left to come to the United States on September 7, 1960, thinking that I would be back in three or four months after the fall of Fidel Castro. I was convinced that the United States would never allow a communist government to exist so close to its coastline...

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4. The Marielitos and Their Voices

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pp. 43-122

My first confrontation with the government took place when I was called up for compulsory military service. For me it was disastrous, as I was only sixteen years old and I wanted to continue with the family vocational traditions of medicine or music. I was virtually imprisoned with...

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5. Other Voices

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pp. 123-148

I first found out about the Mariel boatlift when everyone in Miami began talking about it. Right away I felt a desire to be there to help the community, to volunteer in this emergency. Initially the refugees were examined medically in Key West; then, when that station was overwhelmed...

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Afterword

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pp. 149-150

A great deal has happened since I began writing this book in 2010. On January 14, 2013, the Cuban government lifted international travel restrictions for the Cuban people, for the first time allowing many to apply for a passport and potentially travel outside the country. And on December 17...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. 151-152

I owe my deepest gratitude to the NFocus team and especially to Jesse Larson, without whose support and energy this project would not be what it is today. I am also indebted to Rob Tritton, James Carleton, Laura Ward, and Virginia Veloria for capturing everything that was expected...

Appendix: Photos of the NFocus Team in Cuba

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pp. 153-156

Mariel Boatlift Chronology

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pp. 157-160

Notes

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pp. 161-166

Bibliography

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pp. 167-170

Index

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pp. 171-182