In this Book

summary
Within popular music there are entire genres (jazz “standards”), styles (hip hop), techniques (sampling), and practices (covers) that rely heavily on references between music of different styles and genres. This interdisciplinary collection of essays covers a wide range of musical styles and artists to investigate intertextuality—the shaping of one text by another—in popular music. The Pop Palimpsest offers new methodologies and frameworks for the analysis of intertextuality in popular music, and provides new lenses for examining relationships between a variety of texts both musical and nonmusical. Enriched by perspectives from multiple subdisciplines, The Pop Palimpsest considers a broad range of intertextual relationships in popular music to explore creative practices and processes and the networks that intertextual practices create between artists and listeners.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Title Page, Copyright
  2. pp. i-iv
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  1. Foreword: The Intertextual Network
  2. J. Peter Burkholder
  3. pp. v-xviii
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. xix-xx
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  1. Introduction
  2. Lori Burns and Serge Lacasse
  3. pp. 1-6
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  1. Section I. Transtextualities
  1. 1. Toward a Model of Transphonography
  2. Serge Lacasse
  3. pp. 9-60
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  1. 2. Genettean Hypertextuality as Applied to the Music of Genesis: Intertextual and Intratextual Approaches
  2. Roger Castonguay
  3. pp. 61-82
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  1. Section II. Intertextual Analyses
  1. 3. The Bitter Taste of Praise: Singing “Hallelujah”
  2. Allan Moore
  3. pp. 85-105
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  1. 4. The Electric Light Orchestra and the Anxiety of the Beatles’ Influence
  2. Mark Spicer
  3. pp. 106-136
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  1. 5. “If You’re Gonna Have a Hit”: Intratextual Mixes and Edits of Pop Recordings
  2. Walter Everett
  3. pp. 137-168
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  1. 6. Someone and Someone: Dialogic Intertextuality and Neil Young
  2. William Echard
  3. pp. 169-189
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  1. 7. Intertextuality in the Nineteenth-Century French Vaudeville
  2. Mary S. Woodside
  3. pp. 190-212
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  1. Section III. Intermedial Subjectivities
  1. 8. Rap Gods and Monsters: Words, Music, and Images in the Hip-Hop Intertexts of Eminem, Jay-Z, and Kanye West
  2. Lori Burns and Alyssa Woods
  3. pp. 215-251
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  1. 9. Performative Strategies and Musical Markers in the Eurythmics’ “I Need a Man”
  2. Stan Hawkins
  3. pp. 252-270
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  1. Section IV. Intertextual Productions
  1. 10. Timbre as Text: The Cognitive Roots of Intertextuality
  2. Simon Zagorski-Thomas
  3. pp. 273-290
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  1. 11. Intertextuality and Lineage in The Game’s “We Ain’t” and Kendrick Lamar’s “m.A.A.d. City”
  2. Justin A. Williams
  3. pp. 291-312
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  1. 12. Mix Tapes, Memory, and Nostalgia: An Introduction to Phonographic Anthologies
  2. Serge Lacasse and Andy Bennett
  3. pp. 313-330
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  1. List of Contributors
  2. pp. 331-336
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 337-360
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Additional Information

ISBN
9780472123513
Related ISBN
9780472130672
MARC Record
OCLC
1004981775
Pages
380
Launched on MUSE
2018-02-10
Language
English
Open Access
No
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