Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-x

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Introduction. Contexts and Constraints in Contemporary Intercollegiate Athletics

Ryan King-White

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pp. 1-18

On November 23, 1984, Boston College Eagles (BC) dueled with the University of Miami– Florida Hurricanes (UM) in a highly competitive and entertaining football game. Down 45 to 41 with 6 seconds remaining on the clock, Doug Flutie— star quarterback for BC— completed a last- second “Hail Mary” touchdown pass to Gerard Phelan that gave their team a memorable 47– 45 victory. The oft-celebrated play helped catapult BC’s football team to a 10– 2 season record, and a #5 national ranking as tabulated by the Associated Press. Flutie— whose popularity skyrocketed nationally— received the Heisman Memorial Trophy, an award...

Part One. Ongoing Issues

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Chapter 1. Truth for Sale: Penn State, (Joe) Paterno, and (Terry) Pegula

Henry Giroux, Susan Searls Giroux, and Ryan King-White

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pp. 21-34

By now, most people are aware of the deeply disturbing Penn State rape scandal, and the events that took place over the better part of 30 years at the institution. News story after news story has broken down the gruesome details of Jerry Sandusky using his charitable football camp— 2nd Mile— to rape young boys, and thus rob them of their innocence and of a chance at the life his organization purported to support. Sandusky— who was investigated by the state in 2008— was convicted on 45 of 48 counts of sexual assault and sentenced to 60 to 442 years in jail on June 22, 2012. The entire ordeal was thoroughly considered...

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Chapter 2. “A Common- Sense, Fiscally Conservative Approach”: Sport, Politics, and the Death of Higher Education in Wisconsin

Neal C. Ternes and Michael D. Giardina

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pp. 35-53

In the East Gallery of the Wisconsin Capitol sits a bust of former congressman and governor, Robert La Follette, Sr. “Fighting Bob” was the founder of the Wisconsin Idea, which promoted the control of institutions by the people over private interests, and expanded the role of the university and academics in determining public policy. Progressive reforms stemming from the Wisconsin Idea included laws that protected injured workers, expanded conservation of waterways and forests, and the formation of cooperatives and unions (see, e.g. Barnett, 1907). The Wisconsin Idea was codified in the University of Wisconsin...

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Chapter 3. Fixing the Front Porch?: Maryland’s Move to the Big Ten

Jaime Deluca and Callie Batts Maddox

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pp. 54-74

In 1953, the University of Maryland became a charter member of the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC), an affiliation of universities competing in NCAA Division I athletics. During its time in the ACC, Maryland developed highly successful athletic programs in a variety of sports. Despite its long tenure in the ACC— and strong rivalries with conference foes rooted in campus culture—the Maryland Board of Regents approved a measure to leave the conference in 2012 and join the Big Ten after its presidents voted to accept the University of Maryland (Mihoces, 2012). The Big Ten is the oldest Division I collegiate...

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Chapter 4. Football, Rape Culture, and the Neoliberal University (as) Brand: Reflections on Institutional Governance in the Jameis Winston Rape Investigation

Matthew G. Hawzen, Lauren C. Anderson, and Joshua I. Newman

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pp. 75-96

On January 25, 2015, The Florida State University Board of Trustees— a public body corporate of the State of Florida acting for and on behalf of Florida State University (FSU)— settled a federal Title IX lawsuit with a former female student, called “Jane Doe” to protect her identity (Jane Doe vs. The Florida State University Board of Trustees, 2015). The student claimed that the university acted “deliberately indifferent” toward her allegations that she was sexually assaulted by former Florida State University quarterback Jameis Winston on the night of December 7, 2012, and that the university concealed and...

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Chapter 5. College Athletes as Employees and the Politics of Title IX

Ellen J. Staurowsky

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pp. 97-128

Mention the prospect of acknowledging “big- time” college football players as employees who have a right to collectively bargain for purposes of shaping the rules that govern their lives or basketball players as deserving of having their value recognized for the contributions they make to the multi- billion- dollar industry of college sport and somewhere in the conversation Title IX1 comes up. In an interview with espnW in April of 2016, consultant and lobbyist Donna Lopiano commented that litigation filed by college athletes seeking fair...

Part Two. Emerging Concerns

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Chapter 6. The National Collegiate Athletic Association’s “Nothing Short of Remarkable” Rebranding of Academic Success

Richard M. Southall and Crystal Southall

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pp. 131-152

Almost since the founding of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA), college sport leaders have noted “an inherent tension between the intellectual independence of the academy and the use of corporate dollars to support any aspect of higher education” (National Collegiate Athletic Association [NCAA], 2010b, ¶ 2). In 2012, Wally Renfro (former NCAA vice president and policy advisor) declared, “commercial activity within the context of intercollegiate athletics is as old as the games themselves and it is growing” (Renfro, 2012, p. 33). He also stated, “participation in college sports enhances the...

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Chapter 7. Is This the Beginning of the End?: Small Colleges and Universities Are Questioning the Value of an NCAA Program for Their Student Body

Oliver Rick

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pp. 153-169

As this book describes in detail, there are numerous ways in which the world of collegiate sport and the NCAA system is in an extreme state of flux. While some laud its successes, others heavily criticize the professionalized nature of what “amateur” scholastic sports has become (Pope & Pope, 2009). Those who consider the current system to be problematic query the underlying economic contradictions of these programs, their inability to return meaningful capital to the university, the lack of evidence supporting ongoing positive indirect returns on investment, the general growth in university spending on collegiate sports...

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Chapter 8. Confessions of a Human Trafficker: Inside the Global Network (of International Student-Athletes in NCAA Football)

Adam Beissel

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pp. 170-192

The prominence and competitive success of international student- athletes (ISAs) is a growing trend in United States collegiate athletics (Love & Kim, 2011; Zonder, 2013). Over the past decade, there has been a nearly threefold increase in the number of ISAs coming to the United States to compete in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) athletics. The NCAA estimated that in 1999– 2000, approximately 3,589 ISAs competed in NCAA- sponsored athletic competitions (Zgonc, 2010), but by 2009– 2010, the number of ISAs participating in Division I, II, and III NCAA athletics had risen to 17,635, or more than 10%...

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Chapter 9. Welcome to the Factory: College Athletics and Corporatized Recruiting

Jacob J. Bustad and Ronald L. Mower

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pp. 193-207

Over the past 20 years, the process of recruitment has been especially impacted by organizations that are structured around the intersection of fee-based services and digital media, thus combining technological innovation with the application of a market- based model for athlete recruiting. In the authors’s view, these organizations evince the further transformation of athlete recruiting as an industry, in that the process of engaging and enrolling potential college athletes has been reshaped according to the logics of marketization and entrepreneurial strategies. Many of the same economic rationales that increasingly...

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Chapter 10. “Some Kind of Joke”: Consultancy Firms and College Athletics

Ryan King-White

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pp. 208-222

As the preceding chapters have outlined, the changes in intercollegiate athletics brought about by the twinned forces of late capitalism and neoliberal ideology have produced myriad unintended and unexpected outcomes in the ways that college sport is organized, expressed, and experienced. One interesting—and relatively new— enterprise in intercollegiate athletics is executive search and consultation firms. Much like coaches outsourcing recruiting to companies such as Factory Athletics, Elite Sports Recruiting, and Victory Recruiting to enable coaches to have access to more on- field talent (discussed in Chapter 8 by...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. 223-224

I would like to thank all of my authors and my editor for their hard work in putting this volume together. In addition, I thank Dave Andrews for taking me on as a student and not giving up even if it would have been easy, Michael Silk for those early years at Maryland, and Stephen Mosher and Ellen Staurowsky for getting me to engage in sport critically at Ithaca College as an undergraduate. Josh Newman deserves special mention for serving as a guiding beacon, and Adam Beissel for the hours of phone conversations about this project and other...

Notes on Contributors

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pp. 225-228

Index

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pp. 229-232