In this Book

Ancient Rhetorics and Digital Networks
summary
An examination of two seemingly incongruous areas of study: classical models of argumentation and modern modes of digital communication

What can ancient rhetorical theory possibly tell us about the role of new digital media technologies in contemporary public culture? Some central issues we currently deal with—making sense of information abundance, persuading others in our social network, navigating new media ecologies, and shaping broader cultural currents—also pressed upon the ancients.
 
Ancient Rhetorics and Digital Networks makes this connection explicit, reexamining key figures, texts, concepts, and sensibilities from ancient rhetoric in light of the glow of digital networks, or, ordered conversely, surveying the angles and tangles of digital networks from viewpoints afforded by ancient rhetoric. By providing an orientation grounded in ancient rhetorics, this collection simultaneously historicizes contemporary developments and reenergizes ancient rhetorical vocabularies.
 
Contributors engage with a variety of digital phenomena including remix, big data, identity and anonymity, memes and virals, visual images, decorum, and networking. Taken together, the essays in Ancient Rhetorics and Digital Networks help us to understand and navigate some of the fundamental communicative issues we deal with today.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Half Title, Series Page, Title Page, Copyright, Dedication
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. vii-viii
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  1. List of Figures
  2. pp. ix-x
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  1. Preface: Finding Rhetorical Poroi in the Pontos of Internetworked Media
  2. pp. xi-xiv
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. xv-xvi
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  1. Introduction
  2. Michele Kennerly, Damien Smith Pfister
  3. pp. 1-27
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  1. 1. On Network
  2. Mari Lee Mifsud
  3. pp. 28-47
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  1. 2. Imagining Confucian Audiences: Tactical Media and the Umbrella Movement
  2. Arabella Lyon
  3. pp. 48-66
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  1. 3. Big Data and Global Knowledge: A Protagorean Analysis of the United Nations’ Global Pulse
  2. E. Johanna Hartelius
  3. pp. 67-87
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  1. 4. On Fear and Longing: Gorgias and the Phobos and Erōs of Visual Rhetoric
  2. Nathan Crick
  3. pp. 88-106
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  1. 5. Impure Imaginations: The Rhetorical Humors of Digital Virology
  2. Christopher J. Gilbert
  3. pp. 107-131
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  1. 6. Isocratean Tropos and Mediated Multiplicity
  2. Rosa A. Eberly, Jeremy David Johnson
  3. pp. 132-153
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  1. 7. Plato’s Phaedrus and the Ideology of Immersion
  2. Ekaterina V. Haskins, Gaines S. Hubbell
  3. pp. 154-175
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  1. 8. Genre in Ancient and Networked Media
  2. Carolyn R. Miller
  3. pp. 176-204
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  1. 9. Poiēsis, Genesis, Mimēsis: Toward a Less Selfish Genealogy of Memes
  2. Michele Kennerly, Damien Smith Pfister
  3. pp. 205-228
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  1. 10. Remix, Śūnyatā, and Prosōpopoeia: Projecting Voice in the Digital Age
  2. Scott Haden Church
  3. pp. 229-251
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  1. 11. The Jaina Rhetoric of Nonviolence and the Culture of Online Shaming
  2. Scott R. Stroud
  3. pp. 252-272
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  1. Bibliography
  2. pp. 273-298
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  1. Contributors
  2. pp. 299-302
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 303-310
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