Cover

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Half Title, Series Info, Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Prologue

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pp. ix-xii

The ideas presented in this book are ones I have had for a long time— ideas that were critically important to me before I started my graduate work in the medical humanities, though at the time they were more nebulous and intuitive and, indeed, not yet coherent. I started my doctoral program not long after caring for my mother, ...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xiii-xiv

Although it would be hard to acknowledge and express gratitude to all who have made this book possible, there are those without whom it simply would not exist. I am eternally grateful to my family—my father, Ralph, my brother, Chris, my grandma, Rose Marie, and my partner, Shawn Abreu, for their love and their steadfast support. ...

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Introduction

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pp. xv-xxx

The question has been posed to me many times, and every so often I ask myself the same thing: how can I possibly say anything about medical practice and education—let alone write a book about it—if I am not a clinician myself? The question is fair enough, and (most of the time) I appreciate when people are direct enough to ask me it. ...

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1. Exploring the Shortcomings of a “Scientific” Medical Education

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pp. 1-28

For decades, scholars, practitioners, ethicists, and educators have attempted to make the internal morality of medicine and the ways students are educated to become “ethical” or “professional” more conspicuous. If recent statements and actions of professional medical organizations, journals, ...

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2. The “Remainder” in Modern Medicine: The Lived Experience of Illness and Existential Anxiety

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pp. 29-62

Heidegger’s contention that we have forgotten that we always already dwell meaningfully in the world in a way that precedes any scientific examination of that world, though revolutionary in many ways, was by no means new. Heidegger’s early philosophy, especially the ideas presented in Being and Time, was inspired by the writings of Danish philosopher ...

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3. Turning toward Suffering Together

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pp. 63-96

As unrelenting reminders of the inherent vulnerability and fragility of our being, intense suffering and death are realities we tend to avoid, and understandably so. Those in medicine, however, have a more difficult time avoiding such realities, not only because medicine is replete with sickness, suffering, and death, ...

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4. The Formation of Medical “Professionals”

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pp. 97-126

My somewhat extensive philosophical investigation of the clinical encounter in chapters 2 and 3 does not mean to suggest that those seeking a remedy for what ails modern medicine and medical education need to study fundamental ontology or existential phenomenology. Far from it. Heidegger himself says that “anyone can follow the path of meditative thinking ...

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5. The Journey Back to Oneself: Reimagining Medical Education

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pp. 127-164

Developmental approaches to professionalism that value ideas about the journey of becoming a doctor are making considerable strides in medical education. But these approaches are limited by their not taking seriously the fact that medical education significantly contributes to the personal and moral formation of the whole self—a self formed, in part, ...

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Epilogue

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pp. 165-170

Not long ago, an anesthesiologist and critical care specialist told me that, without love, he and his team members could not possibly sustain themselves in their field. It was the love he had for his patients and his willingness to witness their suffering during a very frightening time in their lives that brought meaning and purpose to his life as a physician. ...

Notes

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pp. 171-226

Bibliography

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pp. 227-248

Index

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pp. 249-266

Further Series Titles

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