Cover

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Title Page, Copyright page, Dedication

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-x

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Acknowledgment

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pp. xi-xvi

Many debts were accumulated in the writing of this book. In Cuba, I was aided in innumerable ways by the kindness and generosity of friends, colleagues, and strangers, who opened their homes, shared meals, and agreed to be interviewed. I especially thank René Tamayo, who was instrumental in locating key contacts and setting up interviews. Nehanda Abiodun, patron saint to a legion of foreign students and academics, and Charlie Hill, the longest remaining U.S. political exile in Cuba, both provided key insights into my topic....

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Introduction. Cuban Revolution in America

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pp. 1-26

in august 1967, Stokely Carmichael stood before a crowd of 1,500 Cubans and foreign delegates during the summit of the Organization of Latin American Solidarity (OLAS) in Havana. Convened at the peak of Cuba’s efforts to foment left-wing revolution in Latin America and drawing representatives from twenty-seven countries in the hemisphere, the conference aimed to codify a broad position of support for revolution in the Americas. Although focused on Latin America, the conference drew delegates from across the...

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1. Venceremos Means “We Will Win ”: The Venceremos Brigades, Cuba, and the U.S. Left

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pp. 27-74

in august 1970, the Venceremos Brigade commissioned a fundraising advertisement in Ramparts, a glossy magazine of politics and letters that had become the unofficial cultural organ of the New Left. The ad featured an ink illustration of menacing armed men running through a forest, juxtaposed against an image of Cuban workers placidly harvesting sugarcane. Underneath was the fundraising appeal: “The U.S. Government Sends Mercenaries and Death to Cuba: What Are You Sending?”1...

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2. Missiles, in Human Form: Cuba and the Specter of Foreign Subversion in America

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pp. 75-122

in the spring of 1970, James O. Eastland, the arch segregationist senator from Mississippi, held forth on the Senate floor to condemn the rising specter of Cuban communism inside the United States. “We intend to light the shadows that surround this vicious operation—to drive from those shadows the missiles—in human form—which have been fashioned on that Communist island and fired at America,” the Senator warned. “We want our people to be aware of the direct chain which reaches from Cuba into our cities, our...

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3. Revolution in the Air: Hijacking, Political Protest, and U.S.-Cuba Relations

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pp. 123-152

beginning in 1968, Cuba acquired an unwelcome distinction as the world’s most popular place to land a hijacked airplane. Although the perpetrators came from throughout the Americas, the majority arrived from the United States, making U.S. citizens or residents the world’s most frequent air hijackers. Making over ninety attempts to reach Cuba in commercial and private aircraft between 1968 and 1973, hijackers guided more flights from U.S. skies to Cuba’s airspace than all other global air hijacking destinations combined.1...

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4. Joven Cuba inside the Colossus: The Antonio Maceo Brigade and the Making of a Cuban American Left

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pp. 153-198

any examination of Cuba’s influence on U.S. radicalism, and the ties that North Americans forged with the post-1959 revolutionary nation, must contend with the buried history of Cuban American leftism.1 In the mid-1970s, a loose movement of young Cuban émigrés in the United States and Puerto Rico, many of them exiled from the island as children, began seeking renewed ties to the land of their birth. Politicized by their involvement in the protest movements of the late 1960s, particularly the black civil rights movement,...

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5. Assata Is Welcome Here: Black Radicalism, Political Asylum, and the Diplomacy of Exile and Freedom

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pp. 199-264

on november 3, 1979, headlines announced the prison break of JoAnne Chesimard,1 a former Black Panther and a member of the organization’s clandestine offshoot, the Black Liberation Army (BLA). As the New York Times reported it: “three black men who had come to visit Miss Chesimard, drew .45-caliber automatic pistols, seized two guards as hostages and commandeered a prison van. . . . The three men and the 32-year-old Miss Chesimard, who was serving a life term plus 65 years for murder and assault, were joined...

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Epilogue. Unfinished Revolutions

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pp. 265-272

cuba’s endurance within the U.S. radical imaginary has been derived, in part, from hope. For some, it has been the hope that the structural violence and organized abandonment of poverty, hunger, lack of education, and medical neglect is not foreordained, despite the persistence of Randian ideals of human nature and the hegemony of market capitalism and ascendant neoliberalism. Cuba’s achievements in health care, education, and the privileging of its youth, the elderly, and the sick, despite limited resources, are admired...

Notes

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pp. 273-316

Bibliograph

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pp. 317-334

Index

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pp. 335-351