Cover

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Half Title, Frontispiece, Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Preface

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pp. vii-viii

The chapters of this book cover differing but in some aspects overlapping objectives for the study of mountain lions occupying the Black Hills region. In chapters 1 and 2, I provide some history of the Black Hills region, beginning with the Custer reconnaissance in 1874, when the US Army surveyed the region with the aim, first, to document resources such as geology and vegetation and then, later, ...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xii

The long-term nature of the information in this book required support from numerous individuals and agencies. I am especially indebted to the administration and employees of the South Dakota Department of Game, Fish and Parks for funding projects on mountain lions, beginning in 1998 and extending through 2014. ...

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1. Introduction

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pp. 1-14

I was first introduced to the Black Hills in 1991 as a new assistant professor at South Dakota State University (SDSU). I had just earned a PhD from Oklahoma State University, where I had studied white-tailed deer nutrition on lands in southeastern Oklahoma and southwestern Arkansas owned and operated by the Weyerhaeuser Company. When I arrived at SDSU, ...

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2. Ecology of the Black Hills

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pp. 15-30

The Black Hills are located about 640 km (about 400 miles) due west of Brookings and SDSU (fig. 2.1). Because many of my initial research projects were focused in the Black Hills, most of my trips to visit students combined business and pleasure. My wife, Gail, survived shuttles of students to the Black Hills, meetings with state officials ...

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3. Characteristics of Black Hills Mountain Lions

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pp. 31-43

When we set out to capture mountain lions in 1999, few thought we would be successful, because of the low number of individuals believed to inhabit the Black Hills and the rather complex methods needed to accomplish the task. One of our first successful captures occurred along the South Dakota–Wyoming border. ...

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4. Population Dynamics of Mountain Lions

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pp. 44-67

On one of my trips to the Black Hills, our plan was to fly over an area to locate the approximately 10 mountain lions we had successfully radio-collared. At the time, we were using conventional VHF (very high frequency) radio collars and thus had to be near the collar to receive the signal, via antenna and programmable receiver. ...

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5. Disease Ecology of Mountain Lions

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pp. 68-78

I have had a scientific curiosity concerning wildlife diseases since my experiences as a graduate student studying deer nutrition. In fact, one of my first publications was about a fawn that exhibited skull deformities and was assumed to be abandoned by its mother because it could not suckle (Jenks, Leslie, and Gibbs 1986). ...

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6. Nutritional Ecology of Mountain Lions

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pp. 79-101

My experience with wildlife nutrition began at the University of Maine, where I worked under the direction of Dr. David M. Leslie Jr. and raised deer fawns to assess the effects of digestibility of poor-quality winter diets on their nutrition. Then, while working on my PhD, I evaluated how cattle affect the nutritional condition of free-ranging deer in Oklahoma and Arkansas (Jenks and Leslie 2003). ...

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7. Genetics of Mountain Lions

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pp. 102-118

As with any initial project working on a new species in a new area, when we began working on mountain lions in the Black Hills, we had to base all of our hypotheses on what was known about lions in other systems. Even armed with this information, we knew we were dealing with a species believed to have recently recolonized the Black Hills. ...

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8. Perceptions of Mountain Lions

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pp. 119-133

I have had many experiences interacting with wildlife professionals and recreationalists interested in my research projects through the years. Before I began to study mountain lions, most of my projects were focused on deer nutrition, behavior, and population dynamics. People interested in those projects and findings included hunters, wildlife professionals, ...

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Epilogue

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pp. 134-140

As the human population on earth approaches 8 billion individuals, dispersed within just about every crevasse that can be occupied, it is refreshing to know that a large predator, such as the mountain lion, can still make its way to and subsequently recolonize a region that was once a central part of its distribution. ...

Index

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pp. 141-144