Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Half Title, Frontispiece, Title Page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. v-vi

read more

Preface by

Stephen Murphy

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

My wife, Christopher Smith Murphy, is a great-great-granddaughter of George Quimby. Like many descendants of Civil War veterans, she has been to family reunions and heard stories about this common ancestor. The family had learned about his service in the Union Army: that he served under Sherman, was a scout, ...

read more

Introduction

Anne Sarah Rubin

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-xxvi

In the fall of 1869, at the fourth annual reunion of the Society of the Army of the Tennessee, Brigadier General Edward F. Noyes lauded Sherman’s army. He recalled their successes at Vicksburg and Lookout Mountain, their campaign for Atlanta. Then he turned to the Great March to the Sea and through the Carolinas, ...

read more

George W. Quimby’s Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-2

It might be said that the subject matter of the following reminiscences has been so many times more ably written, that it is now becoming threadbare, so to speak. The writer can only offer the excuse of the French priest, who, while deploring war, said: “I was not a priest until after the great wars; ...

Part I. The Great March to the Sea

read more

1. Introduction to Scouting

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 5-10

From time immemorial it has been the custom of all army commanders, both civilized, semi-civilized, and barbarians, in time of war, to have a small band or corps of carefully selected men to operate on the flanks or rear of their respective armies for the purpose of watching the enemy and to report any change of position or suspicious movements. ...

read more

2. Fayetteville

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 11-14

On the morning of November 15, 1864, our band of scouts, numbering thirteen, were instructed by General Howard to join those of General Kilpatrick, numbering about thirty, under Chief of Scouts Griffin,1 to proceed on the Fayetteville road to the right of Jonesboro. ...

read more

3. General Kilpatrick and Lieutenant Griffin

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 15-18

If any of my readers can imagine the actions of a “mad Mulla” a “Howling Dervish” or a crazy South Sea Islander while “runnin amuck,” they can form a fair opinion of Lieutenant Griffin’s actions during an engagement. He seemed to be possessed of absolutely no fear. ...

read more

4. Mr. Stokesbury

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 19-22

Our scouts’ camp was located near Monticello. However, it was too early to expect the scouts to come in when I arrived, so to while away the time, I sauntered over into the town. Business was entirely suspended; in fact, that was the state of affairs in about all of the back country towns of the Confederacy. ...

read more

5. The Demijohn

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 23-25

We of the main party, on that day numbering eight, advanced to within a couple of miles of Milledgeville and prowled—I think that is the appropriate word—around in hearing of the bells, whistles, and general confusion incident to the hasty evacuation of the city, trying to learn from the excited negroes what was going on within. ...

read more

6. Milledgeville

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 26-29

We learned that night that the 14th Corps commanded by General Jeff C. Davis would arrive at Milledgeville at about 10 o’clock A.M. the next day, and, not having yet been admonished by General Howard, we started early and arrived in the city by 8 o’clock. We rode in an orderly manner without the aid of Bob’s demijohn. ...

read more

7. Texas Rangers

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 30-33

I wish to offer here a few remarks as to the esteem in which scouts held the leading generals with whom they came in contact.
General Sherman was all business with his subordinates, but was very kind in his treatment of them unless he thought they were exceeding their prerogatives. ...

read more

8. Texans Again

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 34-37

The next day we rode over the same route of the preceding one. Among us were two scouts who were not with us on the previous day, and we took pleasure in showing them just how we played it on the Texans, pointing out the ground, etc. Soon after passing the site of the capture, we learned of another party of Texans who were ahead of us pursuing the same direction. ...

read more

9. Missouri Jayhawkers

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 38-40

Next morning we divided our forces into three or four squads and advanced on different roads toward the column of troops. About noon Amick and I (who traveled together) arrived at a house where two foragers had been and had appropriated some ham and chickens, but had passed on to the next plantation. ...

read more

10. Peach Wine

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 41-43

The pontoon bridge being ready, we crossed over the river the next morning ahead of the army and went some thirty miles in a right oblique direction. We saw none of the enemy nor heard of any. We stopped about the middle of the afternoon at a fine and wealthy plantation. The only white people present were the madam and a grown daughter, ...

read more

11. Ferry

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 44-47

About November 30th, General Howard ordered the scouts to cut loose from the column and proceed rapidly toward Millen, cross the Ogeechee River above the town, and ascertain if the many thousands of prisoners held there had been removed.1 If not sent away, we were ordered to get beyond the town and destroy as many railroad bridges as possible ...

read more

12. Millen

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 48-51

We found no Confederate force on the south side of the Ogeechee River and arrived about dark at a point about four miles off the river and opposite a bridge which crossed it something like a mile above Millen. There we found a bright young negro who was well acquainted with all the roads in the vicinity, who reported that it would be better, if possible, ...

read more

13. Pine Cones

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 52-55

From Millen, General Howard’s headquarters and the 15th Corps remained on the south side of the Ogeechee river, while the 17th Corps crossed to the north side, both corps following down and parallel to the river.
Of course, communication was kept up between the two columns ...

read more

14. Riding with the Rebels

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 56-58

The next day, I think it was December 5th, we made a very early start and got fifteen or eighteen miles to the right oblique by the time the sun was an hour high. It was a frosty morning. We had got in a neighborhood where we learned that the enemy had foraged the previous evening and knew that they were present in some force not far away, ...

read more

15. Canoe Expedition

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 59-60

On the following day, December 7th, Amick and I were ordered to cross the Ogeechee River and carry some dispatches across to the left wing, which duty took us the entire day. Returning and coming into a road a few miles behind the 17th Corps, we decided to overtake and camp with that corps that night. ...

read more

16. Down the Ogeechee

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 61-64

About dark we bade good-bye to our friends and started for the sea. I will say here en passant that while we were looking for glory, this was an undertaking that we did not particularly fancy. Not being sailors and considering ourselves fairly good cavalrymen, we felt that we would much rather have been astride of a good horse ...

read more

17. Rescued in the Bay

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 65-68

At this point the bay widened out to a mile in width, and a little farther down the sound, it was two or three miles wide, with a broad opening to the sea. A night breeze had sprung up from the sea and soon the water become so rough that we were in danger of being capsized. ...

read more

18. General Howard’s Version

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 69-71

As hereafter explained, General Howard was in error as to the Dandelion. We did not see that boat until 4 o’clock P.M. of that day, when it was on its return from Florida. ...

read more

19. On the Flag-Ship

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 72-74

There were many hundreds of ships of all descriptions anchored in the harbor of Port Royal.
Soon after the admiral had read the dispatches, signals were made by flags and soon much excitement seemed to prevail, as ship boats could be seen darting in all directions, in every part of the harbor and to and from the shore. ...

read more

20. Fort McAllister Falls

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 75-78

We arrived in the sound about twelve o’clock the next day. I requested Captain Williamson to delay his approach to the upper end of the sound till dark. He explained to me, however, that it was a weekly occurrence for a gunboat to go up and exchange a few shots with Fort McAllister and then retire, ...

read more

21. Siege of Savannah

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 79-81

During the siege of Savannah, the scouts had very little duty to perform, as Kilpatrick’s cavalry were across the river to range the country and protect the right flank, while the left wing was resting on the Savannah River and needing no scouts. ...

read more

22. In Savannah

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 82-84

As soon as the enemy evacuated Savannah, which was during the night of December 20th,1 we moved with General Howard’s headquarters into the city, where we took possession of an unoccupied two-story residence near the Pulaski monument, where we remained nearly four weeks and enjoyed ourselves with banquets, card playing, horse racing, etc. ...

read more

23. The Stevensons

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 85-90

About January 15, 1865, the scouts accompanying General Howard’s headquarters took passage for Beaufort, South Carolina. Immediately on arriving at Beaufort, the army advanced on Pocateligo [Pocotaligo] on the Charleston and Savannah railroad, which point General Foster’s men had repeatedly tried to occupy without success.1 ...

Part II. The Campaign of the Carolinas

read more

24. First Day

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 93-96

On February 1, 1865, the army was stripped for another great march—this was to be an entirely different march from that first made through the State of Georgia, from “Atlanta to the Sea.” On that march the soldiers did not appear to have any particular ill feeling or spirit of vindictiveness against the citizens of that great state, further than as Georgia ...

read more

25. Crossing the Creek

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 97-99

The next day, which was Candlemas Day (February 2nd), the scouts rode at the advance of the 17th Corps. There was a small squadron of cavalry, closely followed by the advance guard of the infantry, then the main column. We joined the cavalry and soon ran into the rear guard of the enemy, who, ...

read more

26. Mr. New

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 100-103

The next day General Howard sent back eighty wagons loaded with wounded to Pocateligo [Pocotaligo] and called for a scout to pilot them. I asked him as a favor that I be permitted to go, on account of being acquainted with so many of the sufferers, which request was readily granted. ...

read more

27. Miss Virginia

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 104-106

For a couple of days, the scouts were kept on the extreme right of the army, near the South Edisto River, watching to see if the enemy should attempt to throw a force across to harass our rear. Nothing of the kind occurred, however. On the 10th, we moved up to the South Edisto at a point nearly due north of Midway, ...

read more

28. Mascots

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 107-109

We arrived at camp early next morning and found General Howard had issued an order for the scouts to be ready to march up the river to the left to see if we could find a private bridge or ferry where troops could be put across to surprise and capture the Confederates who were concentrated at the principal bridges. ...

read more

29. Rain

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 110-112

The next day after the army crossed the South Edisto, the scouts were separated again. Dawson and I went together in a left oblique direction. On the Carolina March, the scouts and foragers did not, and could not, go as far from the columns as they could, and did, in Georgia because there was a much stronger force of the enemy in our front. ...

read more

30. Pontoon Bridge on Congaree River

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 113-115

On the morning of the 16th, we rode from the 17th Corps to a point opposite Columbia, where we found General Sherman, Slocum, and Logan on the front porch of a house looking through their glasses at the city.1 The 15th Corps was passing and Captain De Gress (Old Leather Breeches) was throwing an occasional shot ...

read more

31. Fire in Columbia

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 116-118

When we arrived in the city, we found that it was full of cotton. Every warehouse and cotton shed was full, and cotton was piled up in backyards; many bales were in the streets and on the abandoned carts.
We found a beautiful city, the residence streets being lined with many shade trees and ornamental fences. ...

read more

32. On to Camden

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 119-122

The scouts crossed the Catawba River on the 20th of February on a ferry boat before the pontoon bridge was ready for the army.
On either the 20th or 21st, we had been off to the right to see if any of the enemy were about. On returning to the territory ranged over by the foragers, we came to a fine mansion, the best we had seen in the South. ...

read more

33. Wounded

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 123-126

It was proposed that we approach the Rebel picket as near as possible, without being seen, then deploy to, say, ten-rod intervals, then charge. Each giving orders as though each was in command of a regiment. Then after stampeding the pickets to rush for the town, shooting and yelling the whole way and try to stampede the “gold guards,” and run off the booty. ...

read more

34. Face Off with Rebels

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 127-131

The progress of the army was now nearly at a standstill. The right wing, by reason of taking the shorter route, was somewhat in advance of the left wing, and while the right was stuck in the mud of Lynch Creek swamps, the left had also to surmount this same difficulty, but in addition, had considerable trouble crossing the Catawba River. ...

read more

35. Lieutenant McQueen

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 132-134

Our boys arrived in camp during the day singly and by twos and threes.
Bedoll, who had been captured, was taken away soon after his capture. His horse was led by a guard, and a guard rode on either side and others followed behind. ...

read more

36. Longtonen

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 135-138

About February 27th, while I was riding through the mud on top of an army wagon, chafing with impatience to be again in the saddle, the boys were having an experience both amusing and sad. ...

read more

37. Recovered

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 139-141

I had been practicing, trying to exercise the muscles of my leg to enable me to ride, when the time came to ride to the sea with dispatches. I had saved up a very fine, easy riding mare that I had secured back south of the Edisto for just this purpose. ...

read more

38. Notes from General Howard

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 142-145

The next morning, which was March 8th, at three o’clock, we were up and ready for a start and called at General Sherman’s tent. He was up with pantaloons on, and suspenders hanging down and slippers on his feet, rummaging through some papers apparently in a nervous state. ...

read more

39. Dispatches to General Terry

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 146-149

A small regiment of cavalry being in waiting, we started off on the road toward Lumberton, twenty miles to the south, Amick and I riding in the rear, where we could discuss the situation. We did not like the plans laid out for us. The fact that this Confederate company was to be driven out and forced on to the road ahead of us, ...

read more

40. Delayed

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 150-152

After gaining the right road, we soon came to a house that had apparently been built for a public tavern. Here we stopped to see if we could get an exchange of horses. We rode into a wagon yard through a gate. These gates in the South were so arranged that a man on horseback could open them. ...

read more

41. A Rest

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 153-155

Our expedition now assumed a different phase. The enemy were now aware of our presence and probably had surmised our destination and errand. Had they been old and experienced soldiers, our chances of getting to Wilmington would have been small. At the same time if we had had fresh horses and my leg had been well, ...

read more

42. Dispatches Delivered

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 156-159

It was a long, slow, tedious, and sleepy ride, but just at early daylight we came in sight of our pickets, two miles from the river, and here, we at once knew without being told, that we had come into an entirely different army than the Western. Here, it was all discipline and red tape. ...

read more

43. Goldsboro

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 160-164

On arriving at Goldsboro, I found the army and the scouts and learned that during my absence they had been having some pretty rough experiences. At Fayetteville, Captain Duncan, who had again been put in charge of the scouts as chief, had been taken prisoner by Wade Hampton’s body guard, ...

read more

Conclusion

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 165-170

During the March to the Sea, all buildings of a public nature, such as cotton-gins, corn mills, factories of every sort, fences and bridges, as well as railroads and telegraphs, were destroyed by order of division and corps commanders. There were probably a few private houses also burned by foragers through wantonness. ...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 171-186

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 187-190

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 191-194