Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

List of Illustrations

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pp. ix-x

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Foreword

Paul A. Shackel

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pp. xi-xii

Until a few decades ago the tragic racial violence at Rosewood, Florida, in 1923 mainly existed in the memories of the former residents and descendants of the community. People tend to undergo a type of historical amnesia when faced with a difficult history, and the real healing process can only begin when we try to make that narrative part of the American story. John Hope Franklin, one of America’s most celebrated historians, in a keynote address to the National Park Service in 2000 stated, “The places that commemorate sad history are not places in which we wallow,...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xiii-xiv

This book and its research would not have been possible without the kind support of many, many people. I wish to thank my mentors at the University of Florida, whose constant support and critical insights guided me through the difficult process of conducting research into Rosewood’s past. During my time at the University of Florida, I was extremely fortunate to find a group of scholars who were generous with both their time and friendship.

First, I must thank Peter Schmidt and James Davidson. Peter’s insights...

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1. Studying Racial Violence in America: An Introduction

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pp. 1-18

This book is about memory, history, and violence. My primary goal in writing it is to shed a light on the deep temporal connections between past racial violence and modern social inequality. It can be an uncomfortable course of inquiry, particularly at this moment in time. Educators, politicians, professional athletes, and social activists are increasingly wrangling with topics related to race and social justice. Does increased attention produce positive social change or open old wounds preventing our nation from moving forward? Prejudice seems to emerge anew each generation....

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2. Development and Demise of Rosewood

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pp. 19-51

The development of Rosewood, Florida, stretched across five decades beginning in the 1850s, but its complete destruction took less than one week in early 1923 (Figure 2.1). Unlike similar race riots, of which there were many, Rosewood’s has received little scholarly attention, and most previous research was collected and published as part of a state-sponsored investigation in the 1990s. The official investigation eventually resulted in monetary compensation for survivors and their descendants, including university...

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3. Theorizing Racial Violence in American History

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pp. 52-89

The theoretical perspective from which I contextualize the violence that destroyed Rosewood illuminates how historical interpersonal racial violence informs present-day social inequality. A clearly defined set of terms is required to properly develop and explain this standpoint. Outlining these terms is essential because the nature of violence is multidimensional, and its various forms often intersect in ways that are not immediately clear. My goal in developing a theorized exploration of violence...

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4. Excavating Rosewood’s Past

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pp. 90-122

My decision to undertake archaeological work in Rosewood is motivated by numerous factors. My training as a historical archaeologist certainly plays a role. As historical archaeologists continue to apply our craft to difficult heritage, we uncover tangible remains of the past that resonate across the centuries and speak to contemporary audiences in unmistakable ways. This ability to connect the past and present through material remains attracts public attention, and archaeologists can use this interest...

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5. Intersectional Violence in Rosewood and Beyond

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pp. 123-148

Two goals inform this undertaking of an intersectional study of racial violence in American history. The first centers on contextualizing the 1923 Rosewood massacre within broader social practices of the time. This highlights how separate but deeply related practices combined in distinct ways to destroy a prosperous African American community. The research benefits from information technologies such as GIS that allow a better understanding of the history of Rosewood and its connections to larger...

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6. Collaborative Archaeology, Social Justice, and Digital Heritage in Rosewood

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pp. 149-173

In applying intersectionality to the study of racial violence in American history, my objective has been to develop a cohesive theory connecting past racial violence with present forms of social inequality. I believe the true value of this research lies in its ability to engage public dialogue on issues of race, inequality, and social justice. Here I shift the focus from theorizing racial violence to describing emerging methods for translating this academic research into public knowledge. This requires an act of...

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7. Racial Violence in American History: Why the Past Matters

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pp. 174-180

My purpose in writing this book is to contextualize Rosewood’s destruction within broader social practices and chart how these social practices have transformed over the past century. I focused on connecting interpersonal violence in the past, such as lynchings and race riots, with symbolic and structural violence across time and space. Identifying the connections helps illuminate various societywide transformations in the manifestation and mobilization of interpersonal, structural, and symbolic...

References Cited

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pp. 181-214

Index

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pp. 215-226

About the Author

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pp. 227-228