Cover

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Frontmatter

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Contents

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pp. vii-vii

Plates

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pp. viii-viii

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Preface to the Paperback Edition

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pp. ix-xxiii

The re-issue of a book provides a welcome opportunity for the author to re-engage readers in the discussions that she has left off received.1 It broke new ground in a number of ways. Unlike most society by scrutinizing the history of a local institution, the Tung significance on several levels. Far from being merely a medical overseas, services that ...

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Preface to the Original Edition

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pp. xxvii-xxviii

The Tung Wah Group of Hospitals is one of the oldest and best known charitable institutions in Hong Kong. The local community is familiar with the hospitals, schools, old people's homes, youth centres, and nurseries it runs, and its annual fund-raising show is one of the social and entertainment...

Abbreviations

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pp. xxix-xxix

Romanization

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pp. xxx-xxx

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Introduction

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pp. 1-6

FOR the Tung Wah Hospital, the years 1869 to 1896 were significant and dramatic. An inquest into the death of a Chinese emigrant in 1869 revealed the appalling lack of medical facilities for the Chinese community in Hong Kong, causing a scandal which rocked the...

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1: The Chinese Community before the Tung Wah Hospital

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pp. 7-29

The Tung Wah Hospital's emergence in 1869 was a turning point in the medical, social, and political history of Hong Kong, and one can fully appreciate its impact only by looking at the situation in Hong Kong before 1869. Hong Kong's early history was one of segregation — segregation between the government and the Chinese community. Segregation was, for the most part, a tacitly agreed principle...

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2: The Origin of the Tung Wah Hospital

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pp. 30-49

THERE is a tendency to write about social institutions in terms of without enhancing historical understanding. Society is not static institutions, no two institutions are identical. Each exists in a historical event. One needs to look at the 'objective factors' — social, economic, political, and cultural developments — as well ...

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3: Management, Organization, and Development, 1869-1894

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pp. 50-81

The Tung Wah Hospital building was opened on 14 February 1872 with great fanfare. All the newspapers reported on the 'greatest ever witnessed' ceremony in Hong Kong.1 It began at an early hour. Between 70 and 80 Hospital Committee members assembled at the kung-so next to the Man Mo Temple. They were all dressed in ceremonial robes, some even...

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4: The Tung Wah Hospital Committee as the Local Elite

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pp. 82-120

In traditional Chinese society it was the local elite rather than the official administration which largely managed local affairs.1 It It acted as the bridge between the magistrate and the local community, settled disputes, conducted fund-raising campaigns, commanded local defence, and provided education and welfare of all kinds. It also professed to spread a moralizing influence on the ...

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5: Criticism, Confrontation, and Control [Photo Plates Insert]

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pp. 121-158

The Tung Wah Hospital as a local leadership group saw its heyday in the 1870s and the opening years of the 1880s. This chapter will describe how its ascendency was challenged and examine how new circumstances arose to erode its dominant position. From the start, hostility towards the Hospital Committee was expressed in the English-language press. In so far as the newspapers affected....

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6: Crisis: The Plague, 1894

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pp. 159-183

CRISES — be they floods, wars, economic collapse, epidemics — facade of rationality shored up by the routines of daily life, which are themselves disrupted. Formalities that cushion the shocks of contact between individuals and between institutions disintegrate, the contacts turning into naked confrontation. In the panic and ...

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7: A New Crisis: Toward Integration

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pp. 184-208

THE plague had led to confrontation between the Tung Wah Hospital and the government; at the same time, it also led to a authorities which was in every way as bitter and far-reaching in Contagious disease, it is claimed, has historically been the spur to public health reforms.1 In Britain, the tendency towards centralization and standardization in the administration of public health ...

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Epilogue

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pp. 209-212

The Tung Wah Hospital of the nineteenth century defies simple classification and its story up to 1896 shows that it was indeed many things to many people. But the Tung Wah story does not stop in 1896. As a hospital, it went on to expand in terms of space, service, and facilities. In 1931 the Kwong Wah (Guanghua) Hospital...

Notes

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pp. 213-266

Appendices

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pp. 267-278

Glossary

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pp. 279-282

Bibliography

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pp. 283-296

Index

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pp. 297-304