Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, In Memoriam

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

List of Figures

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pp. ix-x

List of Tables

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pp. xi-xii

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1. Why the Archaeology of Everyday Matters?

Sarah E. Price, Philip J. Carr

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pp. 1-13

The foundation of this volume was doing something different, outside of the norm. We asked a group of archaeologists to discuss everyday matters, a scale not often utilized or made explicit in the archaeology of a particular period or topic. Our proposal was met with some resistance, both from participants and from conference attendees; it was even interpreted as a postprocessual ...

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2. When the Levee Breaks: Small Decisions and Big Floods at the End of the Last Ice Age

D. Shane Miller, Jesse Tune

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pp. 14-23

At face value, the archaeological record of North America at the end of the last Ice Age appears to be a strange place to discuss human behavior at the scale of a single day. We cannot, for example, discuss “the Last Thursday of the Clovis Culture” for many reasons, the most obvious of which is that the archaeological data are much too coarse. In this chapter we argue that in order to shift the scale ...

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3. Chaos Theory and the Contact Period in the Southeast

Christopher B. Rodning, Jayur Madhusudan Mehta, Bryan S. Haley, David J. Watt

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pp. 24-38

European contact sparked dramatic culture change in the Native American Southeast. Mississippian chiefdoms were already experiencing cyclical episodes of emergence and collapse during late prehistory. The focal points of Mississippian political geography periodically shifted across the landscape. These patterns continued through the post-Contact period and perhaps ...

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4. Community Practice in a Post-Removal Cherokee Town

Lance Greene

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pp. 39-52

During the last 50 years, archaeologists have spilled a considerable amount of ink theorizing about artifacts, decoding their functional, political, and symbolic meanings. As Pluckhahn et al. (Chapter 9) state in their chapter on prehistoric craft production, however, most activity was “rooted in the everyday rhythms of domestic life.” It is ironic that a field of study largely devoted to the remnants ...

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5. The Daily Lives of Early Archaic Foragers in the Mid-South

Kandace D. Hollenbach, Stephen B. Carmody

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pp. 53-66

It is somewhat rare for archaeologists researching the Early Archaic period to have an opportunity to consider the “everyday,” which in our view is incredibly complex. Everyday actions are the building blocks of the archaeological record: what archaeologists collect from sites are the results of these actions. Everyday interactions are important for understanding gender roles, ...

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6. An Ethnoarchaeological Interpretation of the Salt Life, A.D. 1200

Ashley A. Dumas

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pp. 67-79

Papers on archaeological methods do not often discuss the role of imagination. They present the theoretical orientation of the author, the methods of excavation, and the application of appropriate statistical tests but rarely examine the creative process driving the implementation of these methods. Perhaps it is not considered part of rigorous science and, as some may say, ...

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7. Maintaining Relations with Deer: A Day in the Life in the Middle Archaic

Christopher R. Moore, Richard W. Jefferies

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pp. 80-94

Subsistence, extraction, reduction, organization of production: the language of Archaic period studies is attractively multisyllabic and has served archaeologists well in elucidating what Archaic peoples ate and how they obtained and used stone tools. If we take a moment to reflect critically on this language, we will find that it is largely, and unintentionally, a language of extraction. ...

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8. The Itineraries of Late Archaic Shell and Ceramic Cooking Vessels

Asa R. Randall, Zackary I. Gilmore

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pp. 95-111

The archaeology of Archaic period hunter-gatherers has often been regarded as a material account of the mundane, a record of the “everyday” par excellence. The apparent longue durée through which many practices persisted has led some to see Archaic lifeways as “monotonous sameness” (Fogelson 1989:139), characterized more by concerns over nourishment and ...

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9. Crafting Everyday Matters in the Middle and Late Woodland Periods

Thomas J. Pluckhahn, Martin Menz, Lori O’Neal

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pp. 112-123

At first glance, the stated theme of this book—“an archaeology of everyday matters”—seemed to us synonymous with “the matters of everyday archaeology.” The material record is, after all, arguably mostly about everyday life in the aggregate (Lucas 2012:183). Moreover, for more than two decades now many of us have operated from a perspective—practice theory (Bourdieu 1977, 1980)— ...

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10. Stone Tool Life Meets Everyday Life

Philip J. Carr, Andrew P. Bradbury

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pp. 124-141

At times in our lives, we have examined lithic artifacts literally every day for weeks. The number of artifact types in an assemblage and questions regarding how best to complete the analysis dominated our thinking. These practical, present-day concerns left little room for imagining the everyday life of the past people who made and used those lithic artifacts. ...

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11. The Role of Dogs in Everyday Life

Renee B. Walker

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pp. 142-153

Anthropologists are increasingly exploring the relationships between animals and people (see Conklin, Chapter 14; Moore and Jefferies, Chapter 7). The relationship between dogs and human is certainly worth consideration in regard to everyday matters. Dogs are the earliest and most widespread domestic animal in the world and thus are potentially an everyday matter for some peoples ...

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12. Mound Building as Daily Practice

Tristram R. Kidder, Sarah C. Sherwood

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pp. 154-163

Mounds and earthworks of various sorts are icons of southeastern archaeology. Indeed, they are the primary icon of southeastern Native American history in the eyes of archaeologists and the public (Knight 2010; Lindauer and Blitz 1997; Milner 2004a; Silverberg 1968; Wright and Henry 2013) (Figure 12.1). We suggest here that they were also the icon of pre-Contact Native American ...

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13. Gathering in the Late Woodland: Plazas and Gathering Places as Everyday Space

Casey R. Barrier, Megan C. Kassabaum

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pp. 164-184

The practice of enclosing open spaces with earthen mounds begins in the Lower Mississippi Valley around 3500 B.C. As the earliest recognized monumentalized landscapes in eastern North America, these locations are thought to have provided periodic bases for the exploitation of natural resources and maintenance of social relationships. Archaeological work at these early plaza sites ...

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14. Matters and Mattering

Beth A. Conklin

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pp. 185-191

It is striking how much life comes into focus through this volume’s project of tracking the “everyday.” Archaeologists work with materials associated with people who are long dead. But in tracing daily experience through its many forms of matter and mattering, these case studies bring vivid immediacy to the biomaterial, biosocial life—humans’ engagements with other living beings ...

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15. The Everyday Archaeologist Matters

Sarah E. Price, Philip J. Carr

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pp. 192-204

As practitioners, we commonly decry the Hollywood portrayal of archaeologists, while a few of us secretly smile and think: “Wow, I am a professional archaeologist.” Most modern, professional, everyday archaeologists are far from these cinematic versions. Instead of wrestling with Nazis, we wrestle with other problems, both abstract and tangible. ...

References Cited

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pp. 205-266

List of Contributors

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pp. 267-270

Index

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pp. 271-275

Further Series Titles

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