Cover

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Title Page, Copyright Page, Dedication

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

List of Illustrations

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pp. ix-x

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Foreword: Heritage Development on a Global Scale

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pp. xi-xii

In this edited volume, Heritage at the Interface: Interpretation and Identity, Glenn Hooper has done an exceptional job gathering a wide range of emerging as well as prominent scholars who provide extraordinary case studies relating to the many heritage issues found in different cultures and regions. However, their scholarship goes beyond mere descriptions of their case studies, for they ground their research in theory and provide a larger context for their work....

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Introduction

Glenn Hooper

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pp. 1-10

While the term “heritage” conjures up for many people an almost bewildering range of impressions, some of them a little vague, many of them comforting and pleasurable, the meanings conveyed can provoke various and often unexpected outcomes. Associated with identity, ownership, or possibly a sense of belonging, heritage can sometimes work like an opiate, a balm to be clung to in times of social, technological, or political upheaval. Although this benign interpretation of heritage can certainly act in the interests of social cohesion,...

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1. Heritage as a Social Practice

Bella Dicks

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pp. 11-24

The ethnologist Regina Bendix affirms that “segments of culture acquire cultural heritage status once particular value is assigned to them.”1 This practice of assigning value is the focus of this chapter. Heritage points out a piece of the infinite available canvas of the past and makes it an object of the gaze, a stop on an itinerary, a photo on a postcard, an item in a catalogue. It also, in the process, becomes the recipient of (often) public funds. In order to be realizable, this value...

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2. “An Inconvenient Truth”: The Use of Federal Policy to Erase American Indians, Indian Tribes, and Indigenous Heritage

Kathleen Brown-Pérez

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pp. 25-38

When I was first asked to write an essay on American Indian heritage, I was reluctant. “American Indian” is a broad classification, including hundreds of tribes, cultures, and traditions.1 I had to give considerable thought to how to write about American Indian heritage while clarifying there are several hundred culturally distinct groups. In this respect, one could compare the term “American Indian” to the broad terms “European” or “Asian.” Providing no specifics,...

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3. Consuming the Contested Heritage of War: Tourism, Territoriality, and the Memorial Landscapes of the Western Front

Jennifer Iles

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pp. 39-55

The First World War of 1914–1918 has now slipped beyond the horizon of living memory, and yet nearly a hundred years after the guns fell silent reverberations of the conflict are still being felt. As Bremer observes, its heritage has lived on and become woven into the fabric of British society.1 Remembrance Sunday remains an important day in the national calendar. Hundreds of words and phrases, such as “cushy” and “over the top,” that came into common parlance during the conflict still occupy our daily speech. The causes of the war,...

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4. Historic Preservation in Nazi Germany: Practices, Patterns, and Politics

Joshua Hagen

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pp. 56-71

In October 1933 conservators, architects, planners, and academics from across Germany gathered in Kassel for a major conference dedicated to historic preservation. Germany’s economy continued to be racked by high unemployment, and the political scene remained volatile as the fledgling Nazi regime consolidated its grip on power. In contrast, the atmosphere among conference attendees appeared decidedly optimistic and conciliatory as they gathered under the theme of “historic preservation and protection of the homeland in the rebuilding of the...

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5. Displaying Independent India Abroad: Nationalism, Cultural Diplomacy, and Collaboration at the Nehru Memorial Exhibition, 1965–2015

Claire Wintle

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pp. 72-89

Government-commissioned exhibitions designed to tour abroad would come to play a significant role in the promotion of India’s outward-facing identity following the nation’s independence in 1947. Of all such events, the exhibition Jawaharlal Nehru: His Life and His India, first inaugurated in 1965, shortly after the death of India’s first prime minister, can be seen as one of the most explicitly politicized, ideological exhibitions of its type. The memorial exhibition...

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6. The Negotiation of Identity and Belonging in Kakadu National Park

Emma Waterton

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pp. 90-105

In 2013 I had the good fortune of undertaking qualitative research in Kakadu National Park. During my fieldwork, I can recall few things more startling than seeing a two-masted sailing ship sketched onto the surface of a rock-shelter, towing a small dinghy and fitted with a looping anchor chain. The image, which depicts a non-Indigenous watercraft, was sandwiched between extensive collections of traditional Aboriginal “x-ray” art that catalogued fish and other animals with their internal organs displayed. The juxtaposition was both surprising and...

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7. Knowing Subjects in an Unknown Place: Producing Identity through Tourism and Heritage in Niru Village, Southwest China

Jundan (Jasmine) Zhang and Hazel Tucker

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pp. 106-120

In 2003 the Three Parallel Rivers of Yunnan Protected Areas (hereafter TPR) was listed as a UNESCO natural World Heritage Site, a 1.7-million-hectare region consisting of fifteen protected areas, grouped into eight clusters.1 Although it is known that China has been active in securing numerous World Heritage Sites since the 1978 reform, the effort put into the application to have TPR listed was extraordinary.2 In 1993 a committee had been formed from the local, prefectural, provincial, and central levels to work on the TPR application....

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8. Religious Cultural Heritage: The Law and Politics of Conservation, Iconoclasm, and Identity

Lucas Lixinski

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pp. 121-135

Religious practice is intimately connected with social life and, as such, also becomes an important part of cultural life, contributing to a community’s or people’s identity. Religion is also enduring, either in its built element, which is often monumentally beautiful and associated with outstanding examples of architecture, or in its intangible characteristics, since many religious rites tend to be passed from one generation to the next with little to no modification. Due to its centrality to...

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9. Beyond the Nation: Making Heritage Inclusive

Johanna Mitterhofer

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pp. 136-147

Heritage is an indispensable instrument in the toolbox of identity formation, boundary drawing, and nation-state making, “a shared source of remembrance, understanding, identity, cohesion and creativity.”1 Far from being a relic of times long passed, with a fixed, neutral, and universally accepted meaning, heritage is an ongoing process of meaning making, selective remembering, and forgetting. The role of nation-states in the production of heritage, and the central function...

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10. Unstable Foundations? The Role of Identity in Heritage Management in Mauritius

Rosabelle Boswell

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pp. 148-160

In contemporary times individuals are emboldened to imagine that with the right opportunity and requisite expertise it is possible to succeed against great odds. Many are encouraged to subject the complexity of situations at hand to rigorous analysis, mapping, evaluation, and strategic planning in the pursuit of a “logical” path to desired results. The dynamism of social existence, the longue durée of inequality, and the effects of increasing commodification are set aside...

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11. Shared Identities through Cross-Border Cultural Tourism

Lee Jolliffe

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pp. 161-175

Cultural tourism is alive in the eastern North American transborder Passamaquoddy region of Maine, USA, and New Brunswick, Canada. Incorporating examples of binational arts and tourism-related projects, this chapter examines how heritage is being employed to celebrate the area’s shared identity through cultural tourism. In areas where partnership is encouraged, a trend is for authorities in bordering jurisdictions to collaborate on the development of tourism.1 The promotion of a border destination region requires the involvement of actors...

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12. The Place of History: Heritage, Tourism, and Community in Derry/ Londonderry

Glenn Hooper

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pp. 176-194

While periodic disturbances and acts of violence have peppered the Northern Irish landscape since the Good Friday Agreement was signed on 10 April 1998, the peace has held, and indeed certain cultural transformations have not only gained traction, but have had a significant impact upon translating community isolation into something approximating regeneration and uplift. What is especially interesting about these changes is that it is within the heritage and...

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13. Imagining the Next Day: Music, Heritage, and Hope

Roshi Naidoo

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pp. 195-208

It is May 2015 and the National Museum Wales (NMW) has an exhibition of work by photographer Chalkie Davies.1 Between 1975 and 1979 Davies worked for the magazine the NME (New Musical Express) and produced arresting images of many of the faces that represented punk and new wave cultural and political rebellion in Britain of the late 1970s and early 1980s. Portraits of John Lydon, Chrissie Hynde, The Specials, and Elvis Costello adorn the walls, and artifacts...

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Afterword: On Behalf Also of Gregory Ashworth

John Tunbridge

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pp. 209-214

This collection has made a wide range of contributions to the growing ferment of ideas on one of the most influential, if sometimes ethereal, concepts of recent decades. It augments further the understanding of heritage issues that are steadily compounding from the growing literature in the field, and does so from the perspective of heritage at the interface: specifically, the contact interface between diverse cultures, value systems, and identities, which holds the potential for confrontation but also presents opportunities for cross-cultural...

Select Bibliography

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pp. 215-222

List of Contributors

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pp. 223-226

Index

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pp. 227-230