In this Book

Dolly Parton, Gender, and Country Music
summary

Dolly Parton is instantly recognizable for her iconic style and persona, but how did she create her enduring image? Dolly crafted her exaggerated appearance and stage personality by combining two opposing stereotypes—the innocent mountain girl and the voluptuous sex symbol. Emerging through her lyrics, personal stories, stage presence, and visual imagery, these wildly different gender tropes form a central part of Dolly’s media image and portrayal of herself as a star and celebrity. By developing a multilayered image and persona, Dolly both critiques representations of femininity in country music and attracts a diverse fan base ranging from country and pop music fans to feminists and gay rights advocates. In Dolly Parton, Gender, and Country Music, Leigh H. Edwards explores Dolly’s roles as musician, actor, author, philanthropist, and entrepreneur to show how Dolly’s gender subversion highlights the challenges that can be found even in the most seemingly traditional form of American popular music. As Dolly depicts herself as simultaneously "real" and "fake," she offers new perspectives on country music’s claims of authenticity.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. restricted access Download |
  1. Title Page, Frontispiece, Copyright, Dedication
  2. pp. i-v
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Contents
  2. pp. vi-viii
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. ix-xiv
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Introduction: Dolly Mythology
  2. pp. 1-26
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 1. “Backwoods Barbie”: Dolly Parton’s Gender Performance
  2. pp. 27-63
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 2. My Tennessee Mountain Home: Early Parton and Authenticity Narratives
  2. pp. 64-100
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 3. Parton’s Crossover and Film Stardom: The “Hillbilly Mae West”
  2. pp. 101-151
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 4. Hungry Again: Reclaiming Country Authenticity Narratives
  2. pp. 152-176
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 5. “Digital Dolly” and New Media Fandoms
  2. pp. 177-226
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Conclusion: Brand Evolution and Dollywood
  2. pp. 227-236
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Selected Bibliography
  2. pp. 237-250
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Index
  2. pp. 251-267
  3. restricted access Download |
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.