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Excavated in 1974, the Sloan site in northeast Arkansas is the earliest recognized cemetery in the New World, containing the graves of a small group of Native Americans who died over ten thousand years ago. Although no skeletons were found in the acidic soil, the number, size, and quality of its artifacts attest to the presence of a far more complicated and sophisticated culture than had previously been thought to exist during the Dalton period.

Bringing together the work of thirteen eminent scholars, Dan F. Morse describes and assesses the assemblage of points, adzes, scrapers, abraders, and other stone artifacts as an indicator of the territorial stability of late Pleistocene peoples. The tools show that hunter-gatherer-fisher populations lived in small, semipermanent villages, hunted and butchered white-tailed deer, processed and ate vegetables, and made dugout canoes. And they buried their dead in cemeteries, a practice previously associated only with the rise of horticultural societies. Many of the tools are unused, suggesting ritual interments and a well-developed system of trade with groups in rockier areas.

Including an overview of the Dalton period in the southeastern United States and a discussion of the region’s geologic and vegetal prehistory—and newly supported by extensive high-quality image galleries now available at the website of the Arkansas Archeological Survey (see inside cover)—this comprehensive study of the Sloan artifacts provides a multifaceted assessment of a site rich in information about the technology of a single prehistoric society.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Title Page, Copyright Page
  2. pp. i-vi
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. vii-viii
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  1. List of Illustrations
  2. pp. ix-xi
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  1. List of Tables
  2. pp. xii-xiv
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  1. Preface
  2. pp. xv-xvi
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. xvii-xviii
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  1. 1: Excavation of the Sloan Site
  2. Dan F. Morse and Phyllis A. Morse
  3. pp. 1-7
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  1. 2: Bioarchaeology of the Sloan Site
  2. Keith W. Condon and Jerome C. Rose
  3. pp. 8-13
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  1. 3: Description of the Artifacts
  2. Dan F. Morse
  3. pp. 14-52
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  1. 4: Sloan Site Biface and Projectile Point Technology
  2. Bruce A. Bradley
  3. pp. 53-57
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  1. 5: Microwear Analysis of Dalton Artifacts
  2. Richard Yerkes and Linda M. Gaertner
  3. pp. 58-71
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  1. 6: Provenience of Artifacts
  2. Dan F. Morse, Phyllis A. Morse, Robert C. Mainfort Jr., Jami J. Lockart, and Glen Akridge
  3. pp. 72-95
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  1. 7: Late Quaternary Geologic History of the Western Lowlands
  2. Roger T. Saucier
  3. pp. 96-102
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  1. 8: Late Quaternary Vegetational History of the Western Lowlands
  2. Hazel R. Delcourt, Paul A. Delcourt, and P. Daniel Royall
  3. pp. 103-122
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  1. 9: An Overview of the Dalton Period in Northeastern Arkansas and in the Southeastern United States
  2. Dan F. Morse
  3. pp. 123-139
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  1. 10: Summary
  2. Dan F. Morse
  3. pp. 140-142
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  1. References Cited
  2. pp. 143-152
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  1. List of Contributors
  2. pp. 153-154
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 155-157
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Additional Information

ISBN
9781610756266
Related ISBN
9781682260494
MARC Record
OCLC
1080551072
Pages
186
Launched on MUSE
2019-01-02
Language
English
Open Access
No
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