Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

List of Illustrations

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pp. ix-x

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Foreword

Paul A. Shackel

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pp. xi-xii

Melissa Baird’s Critical Theory and the Anthropology of Heritage Landscapes provides several case studies using archaeological, ethnographic, and archival research from fieldwork performed in Michigan, Alaska, Mongolia, and Australia. Her scholarship provides an excellent example of how practitioners can use, analyze, and deconstruct heritage landscapes within the framework of critical heritage theory (CHT). CHT is a relatively new concept in the broader field of heritage studies whereby scholars examine the sociopolitical implications and...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xiii-xvi

I owe my biggest debt to those who invited me onto their traditional territories, lands, and/or Country. This book would not have been possible without their permission and their generosity of time and spirit. A number of institutions provided financial or logistical support, including the Ethnic Studies and Anthropology Departments at the University of Oregon, the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, Stanford University, and the Alaska Native Heritage Center in Anchorage. In addition to the agency...

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Prologue

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pp. 1-3

The view, the man told me, “does not disappoint.” We are standing in the parking lot of Woodside’s North West Shelf Visitor Centre looking out upon the massive onshore liquefied natural gas plant, which includes processing and domestic gas trains, condensate stabilization units, and storage and loading facilities. It is a full-sensory experience: whirring, humming, hammering, pounding, whistles, announcements, and an eternal gas flame, set against the blue hue of the Indian Ocean, which brings to mind the flags settlers once used to claim lands....

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1. Landscapes as Heritage

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pp. 4-16

Critical Theory and the Anthropology of Heritage Landscapes is about the sociopolitical contexts of landscapes as heritage. Heritage landscapes, as defined here, include urban, Indigenous, and post-industrial landscapes, wildlife management and wilderness areas, archaeological sites, coastal and marine environments, community-conserved areas, land-trust preserves, and temple complexes.1 Landscapes figure prominently in people’s lives and imaginations. As places of memory and belonging, landscapes often transcend theoretical understandings:...

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2. The Politics of Place: Uluṟu–Kata Tjuṯa National Park, Australia

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pp. 17-41

According to Deborah Bird Rose, to understand Country “is to know the story of how it came into being” (1996:36). Country is the term Aboriginal peoples use to describe their ancestral and inherited places and the practices or laws that guide behavior. Country holds the knowledge of Law, and caring for Country is how people steward the land, including visiting sites, conducting ceremonies, and maintaining knowledge. Central to this philosophy is the Dreaming, or Law, creation stories that link ancestral beings with contemporary and future...

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3. Of Environments and Landscapes

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pp. 42-57

In the summer of 2004, I traveled to Kosciusko Island located off the shore of Prince of Wales Island in Alaska, in the traditional territories of the Heinya kwaan and Takjik’aan kwaan Tlingit people (see Map 2). I was invited to join the Kosciusko Island Rock Art Project, sponsored by Tongass National Forest and part of a newly envisioned Heritage Expedition—a way to undertake cultural resource fieldwork and draw on ecotourism support.1 Tongass had been described to me as one of Alaska’s wildest landscapes, and I was excited to have an...

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4. Experts and Epistemologies

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pp. 58-78

In 2008, I attended the General Assembly meeting of ICOMOS in Quebec. I had traveled to the meeting as part of a larger research project that examined the nature of expert knowledge, especially in the context of World Heritage Indigenous cultural landscapes (see Baird 2009). I sought to “study up,” and my ethnographic, archival, and discourse analyses looked directly at decision makers and those who wielded power in heritage negotiations (after Nader 1972). The project investigated how institutional and expert knowledge was...

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5. Landscapes of Extraction

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pp. 79-96

We arrived in Darwin weary and worn. As I stepped outside into the hot, humid night I was overcome with a feeling akin to what naturalist J. B. MacKinnon (2015:2) once described as a “wave of raw fear, the sort you would feel if a cold hand grabbed at your ankles as you swam in deep water.” Clearly my senses were heightened from jetlag and anticipation, but at that moment I was gripped with doubt about the journey ahead: caravan from Darwin to the town of Onslow in Western Australia’s Pilbara region nearly three thousand kilometers away to...

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6. Toward a Critical Theory of Heritage

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pp. 97-104

We are standing just below the summit of Mount Bruce in Karijini National Park—known as Punurrunha to the Traditional Owners of these lands, the Banyjima, Kurrama, and Innawonga Aboriginal people (see Figure 7). We had hiked up in the early-morning hours, navigating its steep western face, in hopes of getting a better view and some pictures of Rio Tinto’s Marandoo mine.1 Australians tend to have an optimistic view of people’s hiking abilities (and courage), as the trail was marked as Class 3, though its dizzying drop-offs and slippery...

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Epilogue

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pp. 105-108

I am back in Western Australia. It has been only two years since I visited this home on Crockett Way in Karratha. I park the van in front of what had once been a well-kept home. I’ve come to see if my former informant is still living there; I had lost track of him after he was laid off in 2014. I assume he has moved away and that his home is in foreclosure. I base this solely on anecdotal evidence: a broken window, a yard overgrown with weeds, and a for sale sign that appears to have been there for some time. I hear a dog barking and see...

Appendix: Chronology of Events Related to Uluṟu–Kata Tjuṯa

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pp. 109-112

Notes

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pp. 113-120

References Cited

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pp. 121-144

Index

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pp. 145-150

About the Author

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pp. 151-154