Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

List of Figures

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pp. ix-x

List of Tables

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pp. xi-xii

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Preface

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pp. xiii-xiv

During the first decade of the Proyecto Arqueológico Chihuahua (PAC) I was an occasional volunteer member of the field crew. From 2008 to 2015, in response to Jane Kelley’s wish to provide detailed descriptive reports for the project, I edited and produced seven reports that are available online as part of the Maxwell Museum Technical Series. ...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xv-xvi

It was my privilege to help direct the Proyecto Arqueológico Chihuahua (PAC) from its beginning in 1999; this publication is the PAC’s final formal contribution. The project began when I was part of the Department of Archaeology at the University of Calgary and continued after my retirement and appointment as Professor Emerita. ...

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1. Introduction to the Proyecto Arqueológico Chihuahua

Jane Holden Kelley

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pp. 1-11

Between 1990 and 2010 it was my privilege and great pleasure to serve as one of the leaders (along with Joe D. Stewart and Richard D. Garvin) of the Proyecto Arqueológico Chihuahua (PAC). Our principal goal was to explore the south end of the Casas Grandes culture area, which before then was all but unknown. This volume summarizes the project’s findings ...

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2. The Setting

Richard D. Garvin, Jane Holden Kelley

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pp. 12-28

Chihuahua is the largest of the 31 Mexican states, with an area of 247,460 km2 (an area slightly larger than Great Britain and 12.6 percent of the land mass of Mexico) (Schmidt 1973:91, 1992). It ranks twenty-eighth of the 31 states in population, and most of Chihuahua’s inhabitants live in the five largest cities, so rural areas can be very sparsely occupied (INEGI 2015). ...

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3. The Viejo Period

Jane Holden Kelley

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pp. 29-53

Charles Di Peso defined the Viejo period in his massive report on the Casas Grandes culture (Di Peso 1974; Di Peso et al. 1974), and today, four decades later, any discussion of that period begins with his views. Before his work there was little more than an expectation that someone had been on the landscape before construction of the highly visible sites we now assign to the Medio ...

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4. Medio Period Sites in the Southern Zone

Jane Holden Kelley, David A. Phillips Jr.

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pp. 54-80

Before the Proyecto Arqueológico Chihuahua (PAC), the prehistory of the Casas Grandes culture’s southern zone equated to the Medio period. The villages of that period were obvious on the local landscape, and the first serious explorations of the area were by U.S. scholars who focused on such villages: ...

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5. Ancient Plant Use in West-Central Chihuahua

Karen R. Adams

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pp. 81-98

The Proyecto Arqueológico Chihuahua (PAC) analysis of ancient plant use is based on charred or partly charred plant specimens from 28 archaeological sites, including caves, rancherías, possible field houses, and small hamlets and villages. These specimens are suggestive of both subsistence and nonsubsistence needs. ...

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6. Pottery Studies

Jane Holden Kelley, Karin Burd Larkin

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pp. 99-119

When the Proyecto Arqueológico Chihuahua (PAC) began working in the southern zone of the Casas Grandes culture area, basic chronological and typological questions had to be addressed before we could concentrate on larger research goals. For the ceramics we asked questions such as How did the local assemblage fit into general patterns for the Casas Grandes culture area? ...

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7. Geochemistry and Provenance of Archaeological Ceramics from West-Central Chihuahua, Mexico

Philip W. Fralick, Pete Hollings, Joe D. Stewart

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pp. 120-142

From 1989 to 2000, the Proyecto Arqueológico Chihuahua (PAC) conducted several seasons of reconnaissance and excavation in west-central Chihuahua (Figure 7.1) (Kelley et al. 1999, 2004). The project identified two distinct regional manifestations involving Ceramic period agricultural habitation sites: the Casas Grandes (or Chihuahua) culture and the La Cruz culture ...

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8. Central Chihuahua and the Southern Limits of the Casas Grandes Culture Area

A. C. MacWilliams

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pp. 143-152

Before the mid-1900s the southern limits of the Casas Grandes culture area were known (Brand 1933; Hewett 1908; Lumholtz 1902; Sayles 1936a), but there was almost no information about who lived immediately to the south or why the Casas Grandes culture tapered out in the upper Santa María Valley. ...

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9. The Villa Ahumada Region

Rafael Cruz Antillón, Timothy D. Maxwell

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pp. 153-165

The Proyecto Arqueológico Chihuahua (PAC) studied the southern frontier of the Casas Grandes culture. After participating in that project, the senior author of this chapter, Rafael Cruz Antillón, began working in what many saw as the eastern frontier of the same culture while maintaining ties with his PAC colleagues. ...

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10. Thoughts on the Southern Zone

Jane Holden Kelley, Joe D. Stewart, Richard D. Garvin, David A. Phillips Jr.

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pp. 166-175

Over two decades, the Proyecto Arqueológico Chihuahua (PAC) accomplished at least one important goal: the first systematic narrative of the prehistory of an almost unknown part of the Casas Grandes world. In this chapter, we review what that narrative contains and how it serves (or fails to serve) as the foundation for future efforts in west-central Chihuahua. ...

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11. How Paquimé Went from Trading Center to Shrine

Jane Holden Kelley

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pp. 176-192

As Miriam Stark (1992:55) reminded us a quarter-century ago, “Archaeology is shaped by social and economic forces that affect every aspect of research, and we must understand the nature of these factors that affect the production of archaeological knowledge.” Throughout my professional life I have been intrigued by questions about the doing of archaeology. ...

References

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pp. 193-218

Contributors

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pp. 219-220

Index

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pp. 221-234