Cover

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Title Page, Series Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xii

A number of conversations that occurred early during this project come to mind at this happy moment of completion. I am grateful to Jean-Jacques Cheval, Charles Rearick, Gabrielle Hecht, Raymond Grew, and Joshua Cole for their insights. Susan Douglas read innumerable drafts, wrote letters, and...

List of Acronyms and Abbreviations

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pp. xiii-xiv

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Introduction: At the Border of U.S.–French Broadcasting

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pp. 1-6

It was a broadcaster’s nightmare. In spring 1953, Simon J. Copans, the seasoned announcer for the Voice of America (VOA) radio network in Paris, fumbled for words. Fortunately, the problem did not occur in front of a microphone, but in front of a typewriter, as he struggled to complete a restricted...

Part I: The Rise of U.S.–French Broadcasting, 1925–44

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1. At the Speed of Sound: Techno-Aesthetic Paradigms in U.S.–French Broadcasting, 1925–39

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pp. 9-30

In summer 1924, David Sarnoff, chairman of the Radio Corporation of America (RCA) returned to New York following talks with English, French, and German radio officials. “The era of transoceanic broadcasting is near at hand,” he predicted jubilantly. Soon the medium’s destiny, “to bring the Old...

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2. We Won’t Always Have Paris: U.S. Networks in France and Europe, 1932–41

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pp. 31-50

In 1932, NBC and CBS defied the uncertainties of the Great Depression by stationing full-time managers overseas to produce international broadcasts for U.S. audiences. Working from Paris and London, NBC’s Fred Bate spent the following decade developing international broadcasting into a viable...

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3. Voices of the Occupation: U.S. Broadcasting to France during World War II

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pp. 51-76

Late one evening in fall 1941, more than a year after Germany defeated and partially occupied France, a French widow in the unoccupied southern zone of the country wrote a letter that contained a desperate plea. “Monsieur,” she began, “Last night, you said, ‘We wish to remind you that The French...

Part II: Shaping a U.S.–French Radio Imaginary, 1945–74

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4. Served on a Platter: How French Radio Cracked the U.S. Airwaves

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pp. 79-101

In summer 1949, five years after the impromptu “baptism” of post-Occupation French broadcasting on the rue de Grenelle, Pierre Crénesse accepted an international “Oscar” of radio from Variety, the leading U.S. media and entertainment magazine. Crénesse and Radiodiffusion française (RDF; French...

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5. The Air of Paris: Women’s Talk Radio, Gender, and the Art of Self-Fashioning

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pp. 102-126

In summer 1948, two Anglo-American women sat in the Roosevelt Studios talking like the best of friends. “It seems to me that Paris can be all things to all women,” remarked Bonnie Cashin, a rising star in U.S. fashion, “and I think every little inch of it will be of interest to American women.”1 She...

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6. The Drama of Broadcast History after May 1968

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pp. 127-152

In late 1969, French broadcasting—the Office de radiodiffusion-télévision française (ORTF)—produced the latest episode of De la Bastille à l’Arc de Triomphe (From the Bastille to the Arch of Triumph). The English-language radio drama series followed two present-day characters witnessing events...

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Afterword: Radios at the Heart of Nations

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pp. 153-158

At the 1931 French Colonial Exposition, the United States and France bet together on the future of transatlantic broadcasting. Many motives informed the wager. Some were principled and others pragmatic, but neither party could explore its fullest options without help from an ally across the waves...

Appendix: U.S.–French Radio Time Line

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pp. 159-166

Notes

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pp. 167-216

Selected Resources

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pp. 217-218

Index

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pp. 219-244