Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

List of Illustrations

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pp. ix-x

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xi-xvi

This book has been in process for over twenty years and was arguably first conceived when I was a student participant in a service-learning program abroad in Santiago, Dominican Republic. As a young woman, this experience was pivotal to the growth of my consciousness, my nascent critical thinking and knowledge of the deeply complex and messy realities of poverty, racism, gender oppression, and global inequality. ...

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Introduction: The Paradox of (In)Visibility

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pp. 1-22

The chant “Basta ya de Exclusión; Sí a la Inclusión” (Enough Exclusion; Yes to Inclusion) echoed against the old fortified walls of the Parque Independencia.1 Haitian migrant men and women and Dominicans of Haitian descent were joined by hundreds of advocates and scholars from across the globe to discuss the central tenets of the Inter-American Human Rights ...

Part I. Mobility

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1. Afro-Caribbean Women “On the Move”: Historiographies of Gender, Race, and Trade

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pp. 25-46

Cabarete, a prominent tourist destination, borders Montellano, the only sugar ingenio (factory) still functioning in the Dominican northwest. The main thoroughfare that links the northern beaches creates a siphon from the barrios to the south, while the tall stalks of sugarcane lining the highway provide a natural barrier hiding from view the multitude of bateyes servicing the ingenio. ...

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2. Mobile Livelihoods, Transborder Markets, and Gendered Geographies of Power

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pp. 47-63

Marketplaces in the northwest Dominican Republic map geographies of power within which Haitian and Dominican female traders navigate the complex intersections of race, gender, class, and nationality. The mobile livelihoods of both Dominican pepeceras1 (women involved in the secondhand clothes trade) and Haitian migrant women situate them as “border-crossers,” ...

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3. Fanm Vanyan: Making Place, Making Home in Batey Sol

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pp. 64-86

I spoke with Josie outside of her two-room abode constructed from a combination of cement blocks and metal slabs, which adjoins three other rented units that together make up the barrack-like structure of her residence. We sat in a small area covered by a metal lean-to where she was preparing coals and a pot of oil to begin cooking the tostones ...

Part II. Containment

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4. “The Book of Foreigners”: The Race/Gender Contours of Documentation and Citizenship

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pp. 89-107

The Río Masacre (Massacre River), prophetically named in the eighteenth century, runs along the official territorial line dividing Haiti and the Dominican Republic. The river-border has come to signify the role that state terror played in demarcating the absolute symbolic boundary between Self and Other. El Corte (the cut) is the label ascribed to the 1937 massacre ...

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5. The “Beggar Mother”: Discursive Formations of “Deviant Black Motherhood” and the Racial Intimacies of Anti-Haitian Nationalism

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pp. 108-118

Entry. Danger. Alert. Infection. Contact. Presence. Contagion. These concepts undergird anti-Haitian nationalism in the Dominican Republic—a set of discursive formations1 used to define the “Dominican essence”—white, Catholic, Hispanic—against that which it is not—the blackness embodied by Haitians. With long historical precedent, the threat of “Haitianization” ...

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6. A Politics of Expendability: Deportation, Nativism, and State-Local Control

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pp. 119-133

In the early morning hours of Friday, May 13, 2005, armed soldiers entered Batey Sol for what would later be described as one of the most violent and abusive mass deportation raids in the community’s history. Twenty-year-old Yolande had just awoken to the rain, put a jacket on, and emerged from her one-room abode, which she inhabited apart from the rest of her family. ...

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Epilogue: “When the Ground Falls Out Beneath Her”: Reflections on the (In)Visibility of Privilege

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pp. 134-154

I met Amalia the same day I first spoke with the Fanm Vanyan leadership. Her mother, Etté, is the eldest member of the directorate, and her next-door neighbor and dear friend Cosette of­ten hosted our meetings. For months, however, Amalia remained quite cautious of me. Despite my initial efforts, we would rarely converse. I did, however, become an instant focus of curiosity ...

Notes

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pp. 155-166

Glossary

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pp. 167-168

References

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pp. 169-184

Index

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pp. 185-188