Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

Preface

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pp. ix-xii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xiii-xviii

This book began as a railroad history of Centre County, Pennsylvania, intended primarily for a local audience. As the story unfolded, however, it became obvious that an important but largely unknown chapter in the history of both the Pennsylvania and the New York...

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1. Switchbacks and Rattlesnakes: The Bellefonte and Snow Shoe Railroad

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pp. 1-18

Setting the stage for competition between the Pennsylvania and the New York Central railroads for the natural riches of Centre County and the Moshannon Valley began a half-century before the two railroads actually met head to head—in fact, before either...

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2. Moshannon’s Black Gold: The Tyrone and Clearfield Railroad

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pp. 19-39

The Bellefonte and Snow Shoe Railroad built from the Bald Eagle Valley floor to the top of the Allegheny Front, then descended 200 feet or so to the Snow Shoe coal basin. The Tyrone and Clearfield Railroad, by contrast, built from the valley over the Front and descended...

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3. The PRR Tightens Its Grip: The Bald Eagle Valley Railroad

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pp. 40-57

At first glance, building a railroad the 54 miles between Tyrone and Lock Haven should have proven simpler than bringing either the Bellefonte and Snow Shoe or the Tyrone and Clear field railroads into the world. The line, entirely through the Bald Eagle Valley...

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4. Forever Divided: The Lewisburg and Tyrone Railroad

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pp. 58-78

The Pennsylvania Railroad aggressively pursued control and operation of the Tyrone and Clearfield and the Bald Eagle Valley lines. It showed less enthusiasm for bringing what would become the Lewisburg and Tyrone Railroad into the fold. The PRR used the L&T to...

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5. Uniting the Branch Lines: The PRR’s Tyrone Division

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pp. 79-113

On the Pennsylvania, as on most railroads, divisions were the core units of the operating department—that part of the company charged with actually moving trains. The PRR consisted of nine divisions by 1872; each was semiautonomous, headed by a superintendent...

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6. Breaking the Monopoly: Beech Creek Railroad/New York Central

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pp. 114-145

In the same way that the Pennsylvania Railroad used subsidiary lines to plant its corporate flag in Centre County and the Moshannon Valley, so too did archrival New York Central. The incorporation in 1882 of the Susquehanna and Southwestern Railroad was the...

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7. Nittany Valley Short Lines: Bellefonte Central Railroad/Central Railroad of Pennsylvania/Nittany Valley Railroad

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pp. 146-181

In the upper Moshannon Valley, the A ltoona and Philipsburg Connecting Railroad acted as a surrogate for the New York Central. To the southwest, in the Nittany Valley, the Central Railroad of Pennsylvania played that role. From an interchange with the Beech...

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8. Railroads at High Tide

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pp. 182-217

Between 1900 and America’s entry into the First World War in 1917, the national rail network reached high tide, peaking at about 254,000 route-miles, including nearly 12,000 miles in Pennsylvania. Centre County and the Moshannon Valley reached an all-time high of approximately...

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9. The Tide Recedes: Passenger Service

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pp. 218-250

The Pennsylvania and the New York Central did not actively compete for the passenger trade in Centre County and the Moshannon Valley; there was little to be gained, financially. Nonetheless, passenger trains had an impact in that area that was far out of...

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10. The Pennsylvania and the New York Central on the Plateau, 1918–68

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pp. 251-291

As their passenger and mail business declined, railroads were less frequently in the public eye and began to fade in the consciousness of most residents of the Allegheny Plateau. The Pennsylvania and the New York Central remained essential components of the region’s...

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11. Railroading in the Valleys, 1918–68

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pp. 292-319

On the Allegheny Plateau, the Pennsylvania and the New York Central were primarily mineral haulers. In the valleys of southern Centre County, the NYC was absent after its surrogate, the Central Railroad of Pennsylvania (CRR), folded in 1918. Meanwhile millions...

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12. Empires Dismantled: Penn Central and Beyond

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pp. 320-350

The Pennsylvania and the New York Central merged on February 1, 1968, to form a new railroad, the Penn Central. The amalgam operated more than 19,000 route-miles, employed 104,000 people, and posted annual revenues exceeding $2 billion. At the time, it was the...

Maps

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pp. 351-356

Index

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pp. 357-371